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Talk Python To Me
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Talk Python To Me

Author: Michael Kennedy (@mkennedy)

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Talk Python to Me is a weekly podcast hosted by developer and
entrepreneur Michael Kennedy. We dive deep into the popular packages
and software developers, data scientists, and incredible hobbyists doing
amazing things with Python. If you're new to Python, you'll quickly learn
the ins and outs of the community by hearing from the leaders. And if
you've been Pythoning for years, you'll learn about
your favorite packages and the hot new ones coming out of open source.
281 Episodes
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Git hook scripts are useful for identifying simple issues before committing your code. Hooks run on every commit to automatically point out issues in code such as trailing whitespace and debug statements. By pointing these issues out before code review, this allows a code reviewer to focus on the architecture of a change while not wasting time with trivial style nitpicks.
#281 Python in Car Racing

#281 Python in Car Racing

2020-09-0901:00:14

I love to bring you stories of Python being used in amazing places outside the traditional tech silos of pure web development and data science. On this episode, you'll meet Robert "Kane" Replogle, who works on the simulation and test software at Richard Childress Racing. The NASCAR team that just finished #1 and 2 in at the Texas Motor Speedway.
If there has ever been a time in history that journalism is needed to shine a light on what's happening in the world, it's now. Would it surprise you to hear that Python and machine learning are playing an increasingly important role in discovering and bringing us the news? On this episode, you'll meet Carolyn Stansky, a journalist and developer who's been researching this intersection.
Python is quick and easy to learn. And yet, there is a massive gap between knowing the common aspects of the language (loops, variables, functions, and so on) and how to write a well-factored application using modern tools and libraries. That's where learning Python is a never-ending journey.
If there is one message I've been pushing across all of the Talk Python episodes, it's that programming is a superpower. Rather than all of us abandoning what we're interested in and becoming CS majors, we can take our passion or expertise and 10x it with a little programming skill.
We recently covered 10 tips that every Flask developer should know. But we left out a pretty big group in the Python web space: Django developers! And this one is for you. I invited Bob Belderbos, who's been running his SaaS business on Python and Django for several years now, to share his tips and tricks.
We're back with another GeekOut episode. Richard Campbell, a developer and podcaster who also dives deep into science and tech topics, is back for our second GeekOut episode. Last time we geeked out about the real science and progress around a moon base. This time it's why is there life on Earth, where could it be or have been in the solar system, and beyond.
Do you obsess about writing your code just the right way before you get started? Maybe you have some ugly code on your hands and you need to make it better. Either way, refactoring could be your ticket to happier days! On this episode, we'll talk through a powerful example of iteratively refactoring some code until we eventually turn our ugly duckling into a Pythonic beauty.
Do you write data science code? Do you struggle loading large amounts of data or wonder what parts of your code use the maximum amount of memory? Maybe you just want to require smaller compute resources (servers, RAM, and so on).
Everyone in the Python space is familiar with Notebooks these days. One of the original notebook environments was SageMath. Created by William Stein, and collaborators, it began as an open-source, Python-based, computational environment focused on mathematicians.
Python is one of the primary languages for IoT devices. With runtimes such as CircuitPython and MicroPython, they are ideal for the really small IoT chips. Maybe you've heard of the Circuit Playground Express, BBC micro:bit, or the fancy Adafruit CLUE. They aren't too expensive (ranging from $25 to $50 each). But for large groups such as classrooms, this can be a lot of money. Moreover, getting your hands on these devices can sometimes be tricky as well.
Time is a simple thing, right? And working with it in Python is great. You just import datetime and then (somewhat oddly) use the datetime class from that module.
On this episode, we are going to weave a thread through three different areas of Python programming that at first seem unlikely to have much in common. Yet, the core will be the same throughout. I think this is a cool lesson to learn as you get deeper into programming and a great story to highlight it.
The toolchain for modern data science can be intimidating. How do you choose between all the data visualization libraries out there? How about creating interactive web apps from those analyses? On this episode, we dive into a project that attempts to bring the whole story together: HoloViz.
Are you using interactive notebooks for your data exploration or day-to-day programming? What environment do you use? Was it Jupyter and now you've made the move to JupyterLab? That's a great choice. But did you know there are more environments out there to choose from and compare? Have you heard of Callisto or Iodide? How about CoCalc or PolyNote? That's just the tip of the iceberg!
Do you write tests for your code? You probably should. And most of the time, pytest is the industry standard these days. But pytest can be much more than what you get from just installing it as a tool.
Refactoring your code is a fundamental step on the path to professional and maintainable software. We rarely have the perfect picture of what we need to build when we start writing code and attempts to over plan and overdesign software often lead to analysis paralysis rather than ideal outcomes.
#265 Why is Python slow?

#265 Why is Python slow?

2020-05-1901:03:264

The debate about whether Python is fast or slow is never-ending. It depends on what you're optimizing for: Server CPU consumption? Developer time? Maintainability? There are many factors. But if we keep our eye on pure computational speed in the Python layer, then yes, Python is slow.
Are you a web developer who uses Flask? It has become the most popular Python web framework. Even if you have used it for years, I bet we cover at least one thing that will surprise you and make your Flask code better.
#263 SEO for developers

#263 SEO for developers

2020-05-0601:02:352

As developers and technologists, it's easy to think that powerful and unique ideas will percolate to the top. If we build something amazing, enthusiastic users will find and share our creations.
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Comments (25)

Pat Decker

Michael, At the end of each episode you could ask "Is it Gif or Jif?" Just for the fun of it.

Sep 9th
Reply

Carl Littlejohns

great podcast - testing your tests all night (without even being there) - some good coding discipline there for us noobs

Jun 20th
Reply

J Bit

great episode! I've been using Python on Windows for the past two years and I love it. I've never had any problems specific to Windows.

Dec 19th
Reply (1)

Hossein Fakhari

at the 53:12 what is the package name? pip install eo? eil?

Sep 16th
Reply

Dan Stromberg

Pyodide is undeniably cool. There's also a micropython port to wasm that might make sense for basic webapps.

May 18th
Reply

Antonio Andrade

ummm. But the mic sounds terrible hahah

Apr 22nd
Reply

Kelechi Emenike

you remind me of me! excellent Googler, master of science, business-related experience, passionate about teaching... the only thing I've not done like you is actually create my own course... you wanna take on a mentee? I'm game please ^--^

Apr 6th
Reply

Patryk Siewiera

I listen for a year, I fell like Michael Kennedy is my best friend, im so grateful for showing me that excitement and possibilities with this language, this is my new road in life. thanks so much 10/10

Mar 7th
Reply

ねじまきラジオ

Python勉強中の方は必聴!

Feb 16th
Reply

Ketan Ramteke

Stackoverflow users are really mean but I still love it, there is no better alternative to it and the meanness keeps bad contents at bay. So it's good to be mean I guess.

Dec 11th
Reply

Gino DAnimal

What ide does she use? audio choppy.

Nov 20th
Reply (1)

Naufal

Mantul gan

Oct 7th
Reply

Nihan Dip

A great episode, lot's of information to digest. Glad to know how one of the tools that i use daily actually works.

Sep 21st
Reply

GreatBahram

Gentle introduction to machine learning libraries in Python

Aug 2nd
Reply

Saul Cruz

this episode really motivated me to get started on online trainings...if you know something, learn it, and share it...

Jul 19th
Reply

GreatBahram

It is good for anyone who does not have any idea about CI.

Jul 8th
Reply

GreatBahram

if you wanna get familiarr with static site generator, this episode gonna help you a lot

Jun 15th
Reply

Antonio Andrade

This is the deal: blockchain requires tons of energy.. therefore it should be used only where truth between parties is required.

Jun 10th
Reply

Nate S

amazing

May 25th
Reply

kumar prateek

Best podcast on python

May 11th
Reply
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