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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

793 Episodes
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Bernie's Big Bet

Bernie's Big Bet

2020-01-1700:39:3022

The Obama coalition has become almost mythic within the Democratic Party for having united first-time voters, people of color and moderates to win the presidency in 2008. This year, Senator Bernie Sanders is betting that he can win with the support of young voters and people of color — but without the moderates.To do that, he’s counting on winning over and energizing the Latino vote. The ultimate test of whether he will be able to do that is in California, where Latinos are the single biggest nonwhite voting bloc. While young Latinos in California overwhelmingly support Mr. Sanders, to become the Democratic nominee, he will need the support of their parents and grandparents as well.Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national political correspondent who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The New York Times, traveled to California with Jessica Cheung and Monika Evstatieva, producers on “The Daily,” to speak with Latino voters. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: Though Mr. Sanders is a 78-year-old white senator from Vermont, in California, some Latino supporters are calling him “Tío Bernie,” as if he were an uncle or a family friend.Mr. Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren, the two leading progressive candidates, sparred publicly in the last debate.
The Impeachment Trial Begins

The Impeachment Trial Begins

2020-01-1600:26:1131

The impeachment trial of President Trump begins this morning. Today, we answer all of your questions about what will happen next — including how it will work and what is likely to happen. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The House’s long-anticipated vote to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate fell largely along party lines, setting the stage for what promises to be a fiercely partisan trial.Here’s a step-by-step guide to the process.
At the heart of President Trump’s impeachment is his request that Ukraine investigate how his political rival, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., could be connected to an energy company called Burisma. New reporting from The Times suggests that Russian hackers may be trying to fulfill that request — and potentially hack into the 2020 election itself. Guests: Nicole Perlroth, who covers cybersecurity for The Times, spoke with Oren Falkowitz, a former analyst at the National Security Agency and co-founder of the cybersecurity company Area 1. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Times has evidence that the same Russian military hackers that stole emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign in 2016 have been infiltrating Burisma, the energy company at the center of the Ukraine affair. Here’s what we know about the hackers.New details emerged on Tuesday of Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign on Ukraine, intensifying demands on Senate Republicans to include witness testimony and additional documents in the impeachment trial.
The Escape of Carlos Ghosn

The Escape of Carlos Ghosn

2020-01-1400:28:2033

Carlos Ghosn’s trial was poised to be one of the most closely watched in Japanese history — a case involving claims of corporate greed, wounded national pride and a rigged legal system. Then the former Nissan chief pulled off an unimaginable escape. Guest: Ben Dooley, a business reporter for The New York Times based in Japan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Mr. Ghosn leaves behind a contentious history at one of the world’s largest car manufacturers, a record which is now unlikely to be scrutinized in Japanese courts. “Nobody’s going to take it from me,” Mr. Ghosn said of his legacy.The tycoon’s escape preparations spanned the globe, revealing the means by which the well-connected can evade legal accountability.
Why Australia Is Burning

Why Australia Is Burning

2020-01-1300:28:1051

Wildfires are devastating Australia, incinerating an area roughly the size of West Virginia and killing 24 people and as many as half a billion animals. Today, we look at the human and environmental costs of the disaster, its connection to climate change and why so many Australians are frustrated by Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s response. Guest: Livia Albeck-Ripka, a reporter for The Times in Melbourne a reporter for The Times in Melbourne who spoke with Susan Pulis, a woman who fled the fires with kangaroos and koalas in her car. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: After Australia’s hottest and driest year on record, Mr. Morrison has minimized the connection between the wildfire crisis and climate change and declined to make moves to curb the country’s carbon emissions.Many Australians entered the new year under apocalyptic blood-red skies as smoke from the fires choked the country’s southeastern coast. “I look outside and it’s like the end of the world. Armageddon is here,” one woman in Canberra said.The fires have burned through dozens of towns, destroying at least 3,000 homes. Now, unbridled by continuous fire fighting, the blazes have returned to some scorched areas to level what is left. Rupert Murdoch controls the largest news company in Australia, and his newspapers have contributed to a wave of misinformation about the cause of the fires. 
Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard the story of Lucia Evans, whose allegation of sexual violence against Harvey Weinstein helped launch his criminal trial in New York. After Ms. Evans was dropped from the case, questions were raised about how a man accused of sexual misconduct by more than 80 women could end up facing so few of them in court. In the second half of this series, what happened next in the case against Harvey Weinstein. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years. Opening statements in the trial have yet to be made, as this week has focused on jury selection and clashes over the rules of decorum in court.
Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. The story of Harvey Weinstein is a story of patterns. Scores of women — more than 80 — have given eerily similar accounts of abuse and harassment by the powerful movie mogul.This week, two years after those allegations were first reported in The New York Times, Mr. Weinstein’s trial opens in New York. In the first part of a two-part series, we investigate why the case went from 80 potential plaintiffs to two.Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Weinstein’s reputation preceded him as he stepped into a Manhattan courthouse this week to face charges of rape and criminal sexual activity, making it difficult to find jurors who did not already have strong opinions about the case.The reporters who broke the first investigation into Mr. Weinstein explain why the trial rests on a narrow legal case with an already fraught back story and why the result is highly unpredictable.On the first day of Mr. Weinstein’s trial, two other criminal allegations against him were released in Los Angeles.
Pelosi’s Impeachment Gamble

Pelosi’s Impeachment Gamble

2020-01-0800:26:2524

John R. Bolton, the former White House national security adviser, has announced that he is willing to give evidence in the impeachment trial of President Trump. The question is: Will the Senate — and the majority leader, Mitch McConnell — let that happen? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Bolton’s announcement was an unexpected turn that could alter the political dynamic of the impeachment process, raising the possibility of Republican defections.In response, Mr. McConnell said that he had the votes he needed to quickly acquit the president without calling witnesses or hearing new evidence.
Why Iran Is in Mourning

Why Iran Is in Mourning

2020-01-0700:26:5750

The killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, Iran’s most formidable military and intelligence leader, displayed the fault lines in a fractious region. From Iraq to Israel, many victims of the commander’s shadow warfare celebrated his death; but in Tehran, thousands filled the streets to grieve. Today, we explore who General Suleimani was, and what he meant to Iranians. Guest: Farnaz Fassihi, a reporter covering Iran for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:As we break down how religious differences have fueled conflict in Iraq and Iran, here’s a refresher on the distinction between Sunni and Shia Islam. At General Suleimani’s funeral, a senior military leader vowed to set America “ablaze.” But it remains uncertain how, or even whether, Iran will strike back.President Trump and his defense secretary have said different things about how the United States might respond to any Iranian retaliation. One of our Interpreter columnists is struggling to see a deeper strategy.Dozens of American citizens of Iranian descent have been detained while trying to enter the United States. “My kids shouldn’t experience such things,” one woman said after being held overnight upon return from a ski trip in Canada. “They are U.S. citizens. This is not O.K.”
Iran has promised “severe revenge” against the United States for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani. But what made the high-ranking military leader an American target in the first place? Guest: Helene Cooper, who covers the Pentagon for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani was known as the instigator behind proxy wars that fueled instability in the Middle East. His death further disturbed the region’s delicate power balances — and effectively ended a landmark nuclear deal.Some Iranian officials called the American strike on General Suleimani an act of war. As the consequences of the killing ripple outward, our columnist asks: Was the strike a good idea?Catching up after a weekend offline? Here’s what else you need to know about the death of General Suleimani.
Boeing’s Broken Dreams

Boeing’s Broken Dreams

2020-01-0300:29:5939

This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since they first appeared. Today, we return to our conversation with the whistle-blower John Barnett, known as Swampy, about what he said were systemic safety problems at Boeing. After two 737 Max jet crashes killed a total of 346 people and a federal investigation left the company in crisis, we ask: Is something deeper going wrong at the once-revered manufacturer? Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Boeing successfully lobbied to reduce government oversight of airplane designs, allowing them to regulate faulty engineering internally.A congressional investigation last fall asked what Boeing knew before the two crashes.
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the exclusive interview in the Oval Office between the publisher of The Times, A. G. Sulzberger, and President Trump about the role of a free press. Guest: A. G. Sulzberger, The Times’s publisher, who joined two White House reporters, Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker, to interview Mr. Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:In his remarks on the media, Mr. Trump took credit for popularizing the term “fake news,” but declined to accept responsibility for a rise in threats against journalists since he took office. Read excerpts from his exchange with Mr. Sulzberger.Here are five takeaways from the interview.Mr. Trump said he wanted evidence the world was getting more dangerous for journalists. Here it is.
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since they appeared. Today, we introduce Ella Maners, 9, from our kids’ episode on facing fears, to Barbara Greenman, 70, who heard Ella’s story and felt compelled to reach out. Guests: Julia Longoria and Bianca Giaever, producers for “The Daily”; Ella and her mother, Katie Maners; and Ms. Greenman, a listener who used Ella’s tips to confront her own fears. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Ella’s fears of sickness and tornadoes were taking over her life — until she went to summer camp. How the University of Florida is helping children learn to deal with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders.
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we talk to our critic about his reckoning with abuse allegations against Michael Jackson and his efforts to abstain from the pop star’s music. Ten months later, he shares why he still has a Shazam feed full of Jackson’s hits — and reflects on what the ubiquity Jackson’s music in public reveals about our society. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The Times and a host of the podcast “Still Processing.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode contains descriptions of abuse.Background coverage:Read Wesley Morris’s piece about confronting his own fandom in the face of the allegations made against Michael Jackson in “Leaving Neverland,” an HBO documentary.We look at Jackson’s history of sexual abuse accusations, and answer some questions about why child abuse victims often take years to come forward.A musical about the pop star’s life is set to open in New York next summer. Because of Jackson’s fierce fan base, the show’s producers are confident tickets will sell.Listen to the hosts of “Still Processing” discuss how to respond to a problematic artist whose influence has so thoroughly permeated modern culture.
'There's No Going Back'

'There's No Going Back'

2019-12-2700:30:4044

This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today: the unexpected story of how family history websites have been used by law enforcement to track down suspects and win convictions — and why retroactive regulation won’t be able to reverse the trend. Guest: Heather Murphy, a reporter at The New York Times who spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Today, we revisit Part 2 of our series on genetic privacy. If you’d like to catch up on the full story, make sure to listen to Part 1 as well.Do you think your DNA profile is private? A warrant granted by a judge in Florida could open up all consumer DNA sites for use by law enforcement agencies across the country.At a conference this fall, “rockstars” of the DNA industry and top law enforcement officers grappled with how to regulate the use of genetic material in policing. They also practiced solving murders together.Here’s how to protect yourself if you take a genetic test at home.
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. After we sat down with Leo, a third grader, to talk about the impeachment inquiry, we were flooded with emails expressing gratitude for our guest. So we called Leo back and asked him about what he’s been up to while the impeachment inquiry has unfolded. Guests: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times; Bianca Giaever, a producer for “The Daily”; and Leo, a third grader who was obsessed with the impeachment inquiry. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Leo predicted President Trump would be impeached in the House of Representatives. He was right.The impeachment process was paused after Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would wait to see what the trial in the Senate would look like before sending the two charges there.
This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the story of Rachel Held Evans and speak to her husband, Daniel, as he heads into his first holiday season since her death.In her absence, the community she created still engages with her work online. “It tells me there’s a lot of pain in the world,” Mr. Evans said. “I find hope that there are people not yet born who may still read her words.” Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times and Daniel Evans, Rachel Held Evans’s husband. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith, passed away in May after experiencing excessive brain swelling.
Year in Sound

Year in Sound

2019-12-2300:31:1932

Our first episode of 2019 opened the year with a question: “What will Democrats do with their new power?” One of our last offered the answer: “impeach the president.” This audio time capsule captures the weeks in between — a crescendo of controversy and culture wars to wrap up the decade. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Here’s some nostalgia as we head into 2020:Our photo editors pored over ten years of images to bring you: The decade in pictures.And if you’re looking for a longer read over the holidays, check out our editors’ picks for the 10 best books of 2019.
The Candidates: Joe Biden

The Candidates: Joe Biden

2019-12-2000:40:3822

He built a career, and a presidential campaign, on a belief in bipartisanship. Now, critics of the candidate ask: Is political consensus a dangerous compromise? In Part 4 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we examine the long Senate career, and legislative legacy, of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Biden now plays down his role overhauling crime laws with segregationist senators in the 1980s and ’90s. In an investigation, our reporter found that the portrayal is at odds with his actions and rhetoric back then.The former vice president and current Democratic front-runner wants to unite the country in a divisive time. Here’s more on what Mr. Biden stands for.This Supreme Court battle explains why Mr. Biden firmly believes in bipartisanship.
The House of Representatives has impeached President Trump, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. We traveled to Michigan to understand how a fractious Democratic Party ultimately united around impeachment, having started the year divided over the issue. Guests: Representative Elissa Slotkin and Representative Rashida Tlaib, Democrats of Michigan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Mr. Trump became only the third president in American history to be impeached, as the House charged him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The votes were largely along party lines.Moderate Democrats encouraged their party to begin the impeachment inquiry. Now, those representatives face a reckoning with that decision.Are you confused by the impeachment process? Here’s how it works.
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Comments (2961)

Sasha Anne Lyn

I know the Latino vote is crucial for Sanders. While most young people are fairly progressive, I've heard that much of the older Latino community is not only conservative but some are extremely wary of the 'socialisim' stigma that is being weaponized against Bernie. Why on earth would they send young, progressive's to make their case?! This makes me worried. Where I live, it is the older, new Asian immigrants who voted in a conservative buffoon and I think it was a reactionary move. You need people of the same ilk who believe to make your case.

Jan 18th
Reply

Christopher Connor

Great, just what our political discourse needs: more race-based identity politics. It's such poison that divides us all.

Jan 18th
Reply

Nancy Loomis

We must go retro...PAPER BALLOTS, PAPER BALLOTS, PAPER BALLOTS and they must be held under lock and key with 24 hour guard in each and every voting district all across this country. We have to find a way to keep our voting data out of Russian hands. One sure way? Don’t put it on a computer. Duh!

Jan 17th
Reply (1)

Nancy Loomis

Whatever they don’t find, they’ll make up. That’s for sure. The real question at the heart of this matter: Will people be as gullible, as accepting? I’d like to think not. But this is America and Donald Trump is still president.

Jan 17th
Reply

Chris

Nancy is such an embarrassment

Jan 16th
Reply (9)

Aaron Stone

What about the hundreds of people arrested for starting fires? 100 separate fires in Queensland alone. What are the statistical odds of that just happening from lighting? what about the gov't policies of fining people who cleared brush around their homes & now only their homes are left standing? this isn't investigative journalism. This is confirmation journalism.

Jan 16th
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Kamil Zagorski

Ugh. Simply terrible. One sided bash on Australian PM Scott Morrison by his opponent. I recommend more balanced view presented by @sciencebrief published through Forbes for example. What is also grotesque in this podcast that somehow listeners are led to believe that Australia needs to take an immediate action on the climate crises implying we caused this calamity, while others China, US, Russia and so on are here to cheer us. Australia is much further ahead of majority of Paris Protocol countries incl US. https://climateactiontracker.org/countries/ so it is near comical to be lectured by US source on climate issues.

Jan 15th
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Rob Daly

130 days in solitary confinement without chairs, beds etc. is glossed over too.

Jan 15th
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Georges Valade

I think you are missing the point. what about the civil rights violations of the Japanese justice? Would you have the same perspective if Ghosn were arrested in Iran? Japan is s xenophobic society, I believe Ghosn when he says he would not got a fare trial in Japan.

Jan 15th
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Jonathan Petherbridge

Another of a half sorry...

Jan 14th
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snosaer

He compared getting arrested by the Japanese to Pearl Harbor lol

Jan 14th
Reply (1)

lzk222

Wait this guy interviews Ghosn and fails to record the interview?

Jan 14th
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Cynthia T

i like this. i like this a lot. i think journalists aren't taking his narcissistic personality disorder thoughtfully enough. NPD's don't understand how to talk about anything that isn't relative to them; but "good" journalists attempt to focus solely on the issues. The problem is that there are two conversations happening when discussing a topic... the journalist trying to debate the topic itself, and trump discussing the topic relative to how it makes him feel. He is powerless to his emotions and emotional discussions aren't a forte of journalism, but instead of trying to rationally debate with him, recognise the kryptonite. Appeal to his emotions; let him babble; let him feel heard/listened by giving control of the narrative... people run by their emotions will inevitably make their own mistakes. You don't need to compliment or build him up like fox... you can have boundaries; but give his emotions the space to dig its own hole. i think this conversation could have probably gone deeper into his plea of validation from his hometown by asking what would be enough for him? what would he like to see? What does he feel home?

Jan 13th
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JulesP

As with all ‘The Daily’ blogs this is incredibly well researched and curated. It’s so informative.

Jan 13th
Reply

Samar Malekmohamadi

he was a terrorist not a hero! his funeral was held by the people who are paid to do so

Jan 11th
Reply (2)

Curt Coleman

The podcasts I listen to from the New York times are few and far between. when I do it's generally about China or some issue other than America. they are so biased... Even in their attempts to cover it up. any person of intelligence can tell their slants. I can promise you if this was a Democratic president... The approach would be different. we would be hearing about what a terrible person is salamati was. this is a reason why many people do not trust you. fake news.

Jan 8th
Reply (1)

Lei Zhu

川帝..

Jan 7th
Reply

Gloria Bravo

micheal: can they do that? Can the Iraqi legislature kick US troops out of their own [sovereign]country?

Jan 7th
Reply (1)

sternen_meer

A real low from the NYT. Portraying an actual monster as a decent person. Pathetic!

Jan 7th
Reply (2)

Jonathan Petherbridge

it sounded like you thought he was an ok kind of guy, That it didn't matter that he organised violent groups to forward Iran's interests outside of its boarders, and there is no reason to kill someone who actively supports and spreads known terrorist organisations. wtf?

Jan 7th
Reply (1)
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