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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
650 Episodes
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President Trump has announced his legal team for the Senate impeachment trial—and it includes ghosts of impeachment past. And a non-partisan government watchdog says Trump broke the law by withholding aid money to Ukraine that had been appropriated by Congress. Also, one tortoise gets too much credit for reviving his species.This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith, Ayesha Rascoe, and Franco Ordoñez, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, and Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This week, President Trump inked deals in the two trade spats that have helped to define presidency: The US-Mexico-Canada Agreement, an incremental upgrade of NAFTA; and, a so-called 'Phase One' deal to deescalate his trade war with China.It remains to be seen what, if any, impact the bilateral deals have on the U.S. economy, but it seems certain that the president will tout the agreements on the campaign trail—particularly in states with large agricultural and manufacturing sectors.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Chief Economics Correspondent Scott Horsley, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named seven Democratic members of Congress as the managers to argue the case for impeachment before the Senate."The emphasis is on litigators. The emphasis is on comfort level in the courtroom. The emphasis is making the strongest possible case to protect and defend our Constitution, to seek the truth for the American people," Pelosi said in a Wednesday press conference.As early as Thursday morning, the impeachment managers will read the House resolution that appointed them as well as the articles of impeachment in full – on the Senate floor. Later that day, the Senate will proceed to the articles at 1 p.m. – or sooner. This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith and Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Six Democratic presidential candidates debated on Tuesday night in Iowa, less than three weeks before the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.It came up early: can a woman win? The candidates agreed that the answer is yes after Bernie Sanders denied Elizabeth Warren's accusation that he told her a woman couldn't win.And as the candidates debated trade, Sanders stood out as the only opponent of USMCA, the replacement for NAFTA.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has suspended his presidential campaign, citing a lack of money to run a winning campaign.Also, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren expressed her frustration with Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign, after POLITICO reported that campaign volunteers were provided talking points attacking her.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at the Harris Theater in Chicago, IL on Friday, January 10th. The cast breaks down everything you need to know about who's running for president, and how impeachment affects the race. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is expected to hand over articles of impeachment to the Senate next week and when the trial begins, Chief Justice John Roberts will be in the center chair. But how much power will he have? If past is prologue, the answer might be... not much. Plus, what Bill Clinton's impeachment might tell us about what to expect from the Senate trial. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.
The House is set to vote this evening on a resolution to limit President Trump's authority to strike Iran. President Trump is operating, like his recent predecessors, off of expansive war-making powers granted by Congress in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. Many lawmakers say it is time for Congress to claw back some of that authority, granted in part by the Constitution, but the politics of voting on warfare can be complicated.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
No casualties were reported after an Iranian missile strike on U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq on Tuesday night.On Wednesday morning, President Trump announced a new round economic sanctions against Iran in a televised address. He also called on NATO to become "much more involved in the Middle East process."Meanwhile, the impeachment process trudges onward in the Senate.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump's decision to kill a top Iranian general has split the Democratic field along familiar ideological lines. It remains to be seen how much the issue will ultimately matter to primary voters, something that will depend in part on whether the conflict between the United States and Iran continues to escalate.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Top House Democrat Nancy Pelosi called last week's drone airstrike against Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani "provocative and disproportionate."Iran says it will no longer honor its commitment to limit its enrichment of uranium, stepping away from a key component of the landmark nuclear deal it agreed to with six nations, including the United States, in 2015.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump ordered a strike against a top Iranian military leader that seems likely to upset the balance between the Middle East and Washington, raising questions about what comes next.Also, the holiday break did not clarify what is to come in the impeachment process. Remarks from Senate leadership today indicated that the coming trial could proceed without a bipartisan deal on its format, a break from tradition.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, Election Security editor Phil Ewing, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Julián Castro, who served as secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration , has ended his presidential campaign. Elements of his progressive campaign platform, including decriminalizing illegal border crossings, were adopted by other Democrats in the race.Also, President Trump and leading Democrats have previewed their fourth-quarter fundraising hauls. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million since October. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang raised $16.5 million, an increase over the roughly $10 million his campaign raised in the third quarter. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we sat down with New Hampshire Public Radio's political reporter Lauren Chooljian to talk about why New Hampshire's primary comes first in the presidential election and why that matters.Chooljian and her team explored the history and impact of the primary in NHPR's Stranglehold, and we deep dive on the key things she learned while digging into the history.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we sat down with Iowa Public Radio's lead political reporter Clay Masters to talk about why Iowa's caucus comes first in the presidential election and why that matters.Masters explored the history and impact of the caucuses in IPR's new podcast Caucus Land, and we deep dive on the key things he learned while hitting the road and following the 2020 presidential candidates.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
What are the most notable political moments of the last decade? The NPR Politics team sits down to discuss four of their picks: the rise of the Tea Party, the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the elimination of the filibuster for judicial appointees, and the Access Hollywood tape.What stuck out to you this decade? Share and discuss with other listeners in our Facebook Group.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson, and Senior Editor and Correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.Elizabeth Warren did not begin her professional career as a progressive firebrand. In the 1980s, she was a moderate-minded academic and law professor at the University of Texas, just beginning to her research into Americans who have declared bankruptcy.Over time, that work changed Warren and cultivated that kinds of progressive economic ideals that define her presidential run today.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.Joe Biden's first attempt at running for president — during the 1988 election — ended so quickly that it was still 1987 when he dropped out. But that failure came at the same moment that Joe Biden won a major victory for Democrats: preventing President Reagan's Supreme Court nominee, Robert Bork, from being confirmed. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.On December 10th, 2010, Bernie Sanders gave a marathon speech on the floor of the Senate protesting a tax deal negotiated between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and then-Vice President Joe Biden. Sanders was upset that the package included tax cuts for high-income Americans.Though his speech failed to sway hearts and minds in the Senate — the deal passed with a bipartisan super-majority — but gained traction online and to helped establish Bernie Sanders as a progressive standard-bearer.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.In deep conversations in college dorms at the height of the Iraq war, Pete Buttigieg joined friends to create an informal group with a mission: rebuild a Democratic Party that would live up to progressive ideals.Now a top contender for the Democratic nomination, Buttigieg has cultivated a more moderate brand — and faces criticism from a new generation of college-aged activists.Read more: Pete Buttigieg Spent His Younger Days Pushing Democrats Off Middle GroundThis episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (346)

Klintorious

#Trump2020LandslideVictory

Jan 19th
Reply

Blaire Marsolan

I love this podcast!

Jan 15th
Reply (1)

alli lent

#AmericaNeedsYang

Jan 15th
Reply

Matt Huisenga

I miss Yangdrew

Jan 15th
Reply

Greg Moore

This podcast keeps skipping back in the recording for some reason.

Jan 14th
Reply

Samoneh Noohi

Of course, General Suleimani was the really bad guy FOR Americans, because HE was FIGHTING the terrorists.

Jan 9th
Reply

Redi Spades

How many times has the Republicans called out Trump for his words? Many. I was one of those who refused to vote for him in 2016. I have criticized him many times. But then I hear the disdain for Republicans in podcasts like these as you all lump all Republicans into one that gives a pass to Trump. That just isn't true. But we do see that happening on the Democrat side. Ilhan Ohmar made blatant anti-Semitic remarks and you all brushed it under the rug. Katie Hill was turned into a victim despite the gross ethic violations she did. Ralph Northam is seen in a photo with blackface and a KKK costume, and he is still there. The disdain of Mara Liasson toward Republicans in this was overwhelming evident, and that is why Republicans don't want to side with you. It isn't because we like Trump so much, it is that we are sick and tires of being smeared up and down for our faults while your faults always seems to be ignored and down played. What has been the biggest political event of the decade? The constant onslaught for our differing ideologies. We disagree, but the Dems smear and we are done with that. This whole podcast was just an attack on Republicans for the past decade while ignoring the gross errors that the Democrats did.

Jan 8th
Reply

Redi Spades

Great view at her life, now do one like this for a conservative

Jan 8th
Reply (1)

Cooper Freeman

news is not news when the narrator is trying trying to persuade you with adjectives (slammed horrific )

Jan 6th
Reply

Vitor Manoel

já ouviram o podcast conheça-te?

Jan 4th
Reply

David Bradley

how come no one says how much of big babies the democribabies are ...there like 2 year olds

Jan 1st
Reply (1)

Philly Burbs

just listening. Pelosi should drive Trump up a wall until TRUMP AGREES to testify.

Dec 29th
Reply

Philly Burbs

please stop telling people to go your Facebook page. Use something else. Facebook is worse then cigarettes & opiates & you haven't any idea what their long term plans are using our kids! The EU fined Facebook for helping candidates "CHEAT" in 2016 THE USA encourage the cheating Trump spends a million a week on Facebook spreading lies & selling YOUR & MY DATA.. and they encourage Russia to do so. Facebook is predown loaded on EVERY FUCKNG THING & I STILL opps can't get it off my phone after a year.

Dec 29th
Reply

Cajjdiem

he didnt solicit a foreign government to meddle in the election. he attempted to have them look into corruption in their country that involved a former vice president. shouldn't mean shit that 2 years later biden wants to run for office. everyone is skewing the facts

Dec 27th
Reply

A Sanchez

The man is doing his job. Hillary and Biden are the real crooks!

Dec 23rd
Reply

Charles Rodriguez

somebody is doing some deep breaths into the microphone

Dec 21st
Reply

John BIBBS

#yanggang

Dec 21st
Reply

* Nokk62 *

Snowflake pubs, enthralled and following a corrupt "president".... Hope he burns...

Dec 20th
Reply (1)

Klintorious

No surprise that NPR offers an insanely partisan podcast. They’ve lost all credibility

Dec 20th
Reply (1)

James Blacketer

dam snowflakes Democrats suck

Dec 19th
Reply (2)
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