DiscoverThe Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
Claim Ownership

The Art of Manliness

Author: The Art of Manliness

Subscribed: 72,243Played: 1,553,229
Share

Description

Podcast by The Art of Manliness
542 Episodes
Reverse
When we seek an example of great leadership, one man who often comes to mind is Winston Churchill -- the iconic, visionary prime minister, who guided his country through war and stood firmly for his beliefs and impervious to his critics. But how did Winston become the legendary British Bulldog?My guest today seeks to answer that question in his biography, Churchill: Walking with Destiny. His name is Andrew Roberts, he's a journalist and historian, and we begin our conversation discussing why he thought another Churchill biography was needed. We then shift to the life of Churchill, beginning with a childhood in which young Winston often felt neglected. Andrew then discusses Churchill's military career, why Winston was so eager to see action on the frontlines, and how he parlayed those experiences into becoming the world's highest paid journalist by his mid-twenties. Andrew then explains how Churchill also became one of the 20th century's great historians and how his appreciation of history and sentimental outlook colored his worldview and shaped his leadership. We also discuss why Churchill was one of the few leaders to foresee the threat that Hitler posed. We end our conversation discussing whether some of the current criticisms of Churchill, such as the allegation that he masterminded genocide in India, really hold weight.Get the show notes at aom.is/churchill.
Over ten years ago, I read the book Getting Things Done by David Allen. I've been using the tactics and strategies that he laid out in the book in managing tasks and, well, getting things done, ever since. David's out with a new workbook to accompany his classic bestseller, and I have the pleasure to speak with him today about his philosophy and system for managing life. We begin our conversation discussing how David came up with the GTD system in the first place and how it differs from other time management systems out there. David then explains what the "mind like water" mantra is about and how the GTD system helps you clear your head. We then dig into the specific steps of getting things done, including capturing ideas, clarifying tasks into action, organizing those actions, reflecting on your action list, and, of course, taking action!This is a time management system I can personally endorse, so if you're not familiar with it or have fallen off the GTD wagon, I recommend giving this show a listen.Get the show notes at aom.is/gtd.
When Paul Kalanathi was 36 years old, he was on the cusp of finishing a decade's worth of training to become a neurosurgeon -- a profession he felt called to. But then he learned he had terminal stage four lung cancer. In a single moment, everything changed in his life. For the next twenty two months, Paul and his wife Lucy grappled with how to live life even when you know you have limited time left. In his last few months, Paul wrote a memoir about this search for meaning in life and death, as well as his experience as a medical student, neurosurgeon, and cancer patient. Entitled When Breath Becomes Air, the book was published shortly after he died. Today, I talk to Paul's widow, Dr. Lucy Kalanathi, about Paul's journey to uncover insights about meaning and significance during his time as both doctor and patient. Along the way, Lucy shares insights about the human side of healthcare, delivering and receiving bad news, and how your identity and sense of self changes when you're diagnosed with a terminal disease. She also shares her experience of being a widow and of the grieving process, as well as what to say and not say to someone who's grappling with a tragedy.Get the show notes at aom.is/breathbecomesair.
#541: The Art of Noticing

#541: The Art of Noticing

2019-09-0900:46:2210

Quick, name the president who's on the dime. Or think about the letters and numbers on your license plate. Were you stumped for a moment? That's the strange thing about our powers of observation: we can look at something a thousand times, and never really notice it.Our struggle to notice what's around us is even worse in our Smartphone Age, where we often have tunnel vision that limits itself to a little handheld screen.My guest today wrote a book that aims to help us recapture the keen use of our senses. His name is Rob Walker, he's the author of The Art of Noticing, and he argues that tuning into things normally overlooked not only provides fodder for art and business, but can make life seem more vibrant and engaging. Rob and I begin our conversation discussing what it means to notice and the benefits that come from noticing. We then spend the rest of the conversation walking through several exercises you can start doing today to strengthen your noticing muscles, including creating observational scavenger hunts and collections. Rob also suggests several ways to notice overlooked things at museums and why looking at the world like there's a dramatic heist about to go down causes you to notice more in your environment. Get the show notes at aom.is/noticing.
We all know people who have a certain magnetism and charisma. What is it exactly that makes them so compelling?My guest today explores that question in his book Compelling People: The Hidden Qualities That Make People Influential, and primarily locates the answer in two such hidden qualities: strength and warmth. His name is Matthew Kohut and today on the show he explains why it is we find the combination of strength and warmth so attractive in others, and how we can cultivate these traits ourselves, including in the way we dress, carry ourselves, and talk. Matt then gives advice on how to display strength and warmth in different situations we might find ourselves in, from acing a job interview to managing a crisis at work. We end our conversation with that most perennial question of body language: what to do with your hands when you speak.Get the show notes at aom.is/compellingpeople.
In an effort to get more done and be our best selves, many of us have turned to "life hacks" that we find in blogs, books, and podcasts. I've personally experimented with several life hacks in the past decade, and we've even written about some on AoM. But are there downsides to trying to hack your way through life? My guest took a look at both the positives and negatives of life hacking in his book, Hacking Life: Systemized Living and Its Discontents. His name is Joseph Reagle, and he's a professor of Communication Studies at Northwestern University. We begin our conversation with a history of the life hacking movement and how blogging in the early 2000s made this obscure cultural movement amongst computer programmers go mainstream. Joseph then discusses how he distinguishes between "nominal life hacking" and "optimal life hacking" and between "geeks" and "gurus." We then discuss some of the beneficial productivity and motivation hacks out there, but also how there are ways they can go astray -- including only working for a certain class of people and becoming too much of a focus in life. We also discuss how the minimalism movement can sometimes lead to contradictory impulses, and end our conversation talking about how using spiritual practices like meditation or Stoicism as hacks can strip them of their deeper contexts.Get the show notes at aom.is/hackinglife.
Which should you do first when you work out -- cardio or weights? How long does it take to get in shape? How long does it take to get out of shape? How important is your form when you run? Does exercise really contribute to fat loss? Does music help or hurt your athletic performance?These are the kinds of questions folks have about exercise, and have trouble finding good answers to. The advice out there on blogs and magazines is often confusing and contradictory. My guest today set out to cut through the noise by finding the best research-backed answers to these questions and more in his book Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights? Fitness Myths, Training Truths, and Other Surprising Discoveries from the Science of Exercise. His name is Alex Hutchinson, and he started out as a Cambridge-trained physicist and a long-distance runner on the Canadian national team, and is now a journalist and author. Today on the show, Alex walks us through what the scientific literature says about some of the most common fitness and health questions out there. This is a fun and interesting conversation packed with lots of useful insights. Will your own theories and practices be confirmed or challenged? Listen in to find out!Get the show notes at aom.is/fitnessfaq.
Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius was one of the last Stoic philosophers and today is arguably the best known. Thanks to his personal writings that eventually became Meditations, Marcus left us with concrete exercises to put Stoicism into action. My guest today explores this Stoic tradition and connects it with modern psychotherapy in his book How to Think Like a Roman Emperor: The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius. His name is Donald Robertson, and he's a Scottish philosopher and cognitive psychotherapist. We begin our conversation discussing the history of Stoicism and the overlooked beliefs the Stoics had. We then discuss the end goal of Stoicism and how it differed from other ancient philosophies like Aristotelian virtue ethics. Donald then explains the Stoic approach to emotions and the common misconceptions people have about Stoicism in that regard. We then dig into Stoic practices taken from Marcus Aurelius and discuss how modern cognitive psychology backs them up. Donald shares how the Stoics used language and daily meditations to manage their emotional life, and how they went about the psychology of goal-setting and dealing with success and failure.Get the show notes at aom.is/marcus.
If you've read a lot of personal finance advice, you know that it usually concentrates on what you can't do -- what you shouldn't buy and how you shouldn't spend your money. What it doesn't often offer is a vision of what all that scrimping and saving is for.My guest today argues that while knowing how to save money is hugely important, it's important to know how to spend it too. His name is Ramit Sethi and he's the author of the book I Will Teach You to Be Rich. It's now out as a revised second edition, ten years after of the publication of the original. We begin our discussion going over what has and hasn't changed over the past decade when it comes to personal finance. Ramit then makes the case that living what he calls a "rich life," involves not just knowing where to cut back on spending, but where to increase it in places he calls "money dials." We then get into some practical ways to better manage your money to ensure you spend less in areas you don't care about, and more in those you do, including how to manage and pay off credit card debt, the bank accounts you need and how to set them up so that your finances are automated, and why you need to start investing today. We end our discussion on the idea that the big money decisions that many people ignore are more important than the small ones that get a lot of attention.Get the show notes at aom.is/richlife.
Self-help gurus, life coaches, and business consultants love to tell us that we must strive for constant self-improvement to realize our full potential and become truly happy. But it doesn't seem to work -- for many of us, life still seems hollow and meaningless. So focused are we on personal development and material possessions that we've overlooked the things that make life truly fulfilling and worthwhile. But what are those things?My guest today explores the answer to that question in his book Standpoints: 10 Old Ideas in a New World. His name is Svend Brinkmann, and he's a Danish philosopher and psychologist. We begin our conversation discussing why modern life can feel like liquid, and how the typical approach to personal development and self-help doesn't rescue us from drowning in it. Svend then contrasts the common approach to treating choices and people like instruments and means to an end with the idea of doing what's good simply because it is good. Svend argues that we can do that by standing firm on certain philosophic principles, and we spend the rest of our conversation discussing a few of what these are, including the importance of endowing others with dignity, making and keeping promises, and embracing responsibility.Get the show notes at aom.is/standpoints.
loading
Comments (120)

Alexis Soto

what a valuable episode, very precise and informative, I keep learning so much on such a practical philosophy as Stoicism.

Sep 5th
Reply

Kyle Decker

ya, f***ing obviously.

Sep 1st
Reply

Joshua

Kyle Decker hahaha😂

Sep 2nd
Reply

Cam Neale

Fantastic episode!

Aug 27th
Reply

Fadi

tried several exercises. Great episode!

Aug 26th
Reply

Nathan Sellstrom

I'm sorry. my least favorite episode yet. I'm shocked that I listened all the way through, but I love the thinkers he references. I think Svend has a convoluted understanding of self-help. his circular arguments disparage self-help and then rebuild themselves on self-help principles. eg: in human terms, forgiveness IS of primary benefit to the person forgiving. on the flip side, those being forgiven rarely know they've been forgiven. self-help, in my experience, is built on taking responsibility for my actions, endowing others with dignity, making and keeping promises, and forgiveness. none of this is possible without forgiving our qualifiers and even ourselves for the sole purpose of opening the door to these "building blocks" of self-help. I'd characterize his philosophical/psychological assessment as an undignified effort to convolute self-help and detract from the true value it has in helping people work through the destruction of addiction. I've NEVER heard the (wrong) idea that avoiding guilt and shame is a healthy approach to self-help/recovery. life perpetually deals us guilt and shame. self-help brings freedom through honesty, bringing unhealthy emotions into healthy community for the purpose of progressing toward consistency. I find his conclusions to lack clarity and connection to real (right) self-help. Jordan B Peterson takes a much more precise and productive approach to this topic. as JBP says, seeking meaning, not happiness, is a much more valuable and lasting pursuit. Svend loses sight of this concept, focusing more on the pursuit of happiness.

Aug 21st
Reply

Nathan Sellstrom

I'm sorry. my least favorite episode yet. I'm shocked that I listened all the way through, but I love the thinkers he references. I think Svend has a convoluted understanding of self-help. his circular arguments disparage self-help and then rebuild themselves on self-help principles. eg: in human terms, forgiveness IS of primary benefit to the person forgiving. on the flip side, those being forgiven rarely know they've been forgiven. self-help, in my experience, is built on taking responsibility for my actions, endowing others with dignity, making and keeping promises, and forgiveness. none of this is possible without forgiving our qualifiers and even ourselves for the sole purpose of opening the door to these "building blocks" of self-help. I'd characterize his philosophical/psychological assessment as an undignified effort to convolute self-help and detract from the true value it has in helping people work through the destruction of addiction. I've NEVER heard the (wrong) idea that avoiding guilt and shame is a healthy approach to self-help/recovery. life perpetually deals us guilt and shame. self-help brings freedom through honesty, bringing unhealthy emotions into healthy community for the purpose of progressing toward consistency. I find his conclusions to lack clarity and connection to real (right) self-help. Jordan B Peterson takes a much more precise and productive approach to this topic. as JBP says, seeking meaning, not happiness, is a much more valuable and lasting pursuit. Svend loses sight of this concept, focusing more on the pursuit of happiness.

Aug 21st
Reply

Brian Arisius

Love your podcast! Very insightful, useful and even life-changing. Thank you and I hope you keep up the good work!

Aug 12th
Reply

Sawyer  Martinez

Brian Arisius Great podcast! Really useful and informative!

Aug 12th
Reply

Antony Pace

great episode!!👏🏻👌🏻👍🏻

Jul 25th
Reply

Carly Weiss

The interviewee's answers were way too long.

Jul 25th
Reply

Doreen Perry

Carly Weiss yes. It's a liitle difficult to follow

Jul 25th
Reply

Caroline Wanja

E³ Z³ A ³3DŹSZ Z gZz dZ3³ Z 3³ 3³S3Z²ZZ²Z²Z³ 3 ³2³3 Ģ³ZE³GSZ³ŹGZ³ĢX3ZD ZĢ³Ģ ZŹD3ZZZŹZZ Z ZZ ³jazz zZZSa 3z ZZ Z ZZ zGz3Z Z a ³³Z3zZZ3S3z³³³³3³ģgzzģ³³źźzz3źg z³ z3zZ³³3zzA3333G3z3ZŹ³Z³2¹Zz ³³z³A zGZ3e3Z3zZzZZ3G 1zZZ ³zŹ Z ZG3³ź3ź³Zz3 ²³3Z

Jul 23rd
Reply

Jacob Ruse

I feel like becoming is related to Heidegger's philosophy, as well. but Heidegger is poison because he really was an anti-semite

Jul 21st
Reply

Crystal Wright

Jacob Ruse 🤔🤔

Jul 22nd
Reply

David DeLillo

The timing of this episode is impeccable. This opened my eyes to some of my own behaviors. And answered a lot of questions that I couldn't put into words. Thank you thank you thank you. Keep up the good work.

Jul 8th
Reply

Teddy Spaghetti

David DeLillo no one gives a shit.

Sep 17th
Reply

Cover Time

brilliant podcast guys!

Jul 6th
Reply

Bobby Undsoweiter

56:50 summary of the findings

Jul 2nd
Reply

Freddie Matara

Bobby Undsoweiter thank you. hard to listen to this!

Jul 16th
Reply

Eddie Vedder

We salute the rank, not the man !

Jun 27th
Reply

Eric Barrera

I can't finish listening to this. 😂🤮.

Jun 21st
Reply

cameron everhart

I think the "baseline" is the most important part. understanding contextual baselines is key for EVERYTHING in life

Jun 13th
Reply

Felicia Goldsmith

I'm a big fan of AoM, but this man's logic is absolute malarkey. He ignores many of the social realities that women face that keep them from excelling in many areas. For example, when he mentions women not being helpful in the public sphere compared to man he completely ignores the fear of being assaulted.

Jun 12th
Reply

Justin A. Pritchett

Felicia Goldsmith yeah and also the equally valid fear of being abducted by aliens.

Sep 9th
Reply

L. Tertia

Very good episode! You have to have this specialist on again.

Jun 5th
Reply

Sanjay Kumar Chatri

Very informative. Lots of practical advice. Thanks AOM.

Jun 3rd
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store