DiscoverThe Beautiful Universe: Chandra in HD
The Beautiful Universe: Chandra in HD
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The Beautiful Universe: Chandra in HD

Author: cxcpub@cfa.harvard.edu (Chandra webmaster)

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High definition views of Chandra's exciting science
355 Episodes
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Astronomers have caught a black hole hurling hot material into space at close to the speed of light.
Several hundred million years ago, two galaxy clusters collided and then passed through each other. This mighty event released a flood of hot gas from each galaxy cluster that formed an unusual bridge between the two objects.
Astronomers may have discovered a new kind of survival story: a star that had a brush with a giant black hole and lived to tell the tale through exclamations of X-rays.
One of the fundamental ideas of cosmology is that everything looks the same in all directions if you look over large enough distances. A new study using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton is challenging that basic notion.
Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have made one of the first experimental tests of string theory, a set of models intended to tie together all known forces, particles, and interactions.
Astronomers have discovered the biggest explosion seen in the Universe in a galaxy cluster 390 million light years away.
Astronomers have spotted a double star system is flip-flopping between two alter egos using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes.
These six visualizations represent work to explore rich datasets from powerful telescopes, like Chandra, by developing three-dimensional simulations.
Astronomers have shown that the famous black hole in Messier 87 is propelling particles faster than 99% of the speed of light using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
Astronomers and visualization specialists from NASA's Universe of Learning program have combined X-ray, visible, and infrared wavelengths to create a 3D representation of the dynamic Crab Nebula.
Two groups of galaxies located about 380 million light years from Earth are slamming into each other at about 4 million miles per hour.
Astronomers have uncovered a black hole that may have sparked the birth of stars over a phenomenal distance of more than a million light years and across multiple galaxies.
Scientists have found stars forming at a furious rate in the Phoenix galaxy cluster. The supermassive black hole in the center of galaxy clusters usually stifles star formation, but the one in Phoenix is not.
When two pairs of galaxy clusters collide, the result is not four separate objects, but one giant galaxy cluster.
A new image of the Tycho supernova remnant from Chandra reveals an intriguing pattern of bright clumps and fainter holes giving clues about its origin.
A study using data from Chandra and other telescopes provides the strongest evidence yet for three supermassive black holes on a collision course.
A Tour of GSN 069

A Tour of GSN 069

2019-09-11--:--

Astronomers found X-ray bursts repeating about every nine hours coming from the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy GSN 069.
Over its two decades in space, Chandra X-ray Observatory has captured many spectacular images of cosmic phenomena. But perhaps its most iconic is the supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A.
A Tour of PSO167-13

A Tour of PSO167-13

2019-08-08--:--

Found at a time only about 850 million years after the Big Bang, this black hole could help us better understand an important epoch in the history of the Universe.
A scientific and engineering marvel, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has spent two decades (so far) exploring the cosmos unlike any other telescope. What it has found will astound you.
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