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The CyberWire Daily

The CyberWire Daily

Author: CyberWire, Inc.

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The daily cybersecurity news and analysis industry leaders depend on. Published each weekday, the program also includes interviews with a wide spectrum of experts from industry, academia, and research organizations all over the world.

1519 Episodes
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An election hack that wasn’t. More DDoS in New Zealand’s stock exchange. A look at how Iranian cyber contractors make money as a byproduct of cyberespionage. Malware sneeks past Apple’s notarization process. The bandit economy that’s grown up around Fortnite. Ben Yelin looks at how the upcoming US elections could direct the nation’s cybersecurity strategies. Our guest is Julian Waits from Devo with highlights from their 2nd annual SOC performance report. And the US Army’s youngest branch celebrates a birthday. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/170
Twice, it’s maybe an indicator. Once, it’s nuthin’ at all...to the machines. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand works to clean up its data sources. Wormy student laptops. Daily Food Diary is a glutton for your data. Ransom DDoS. Caleb Barlow examines how we handle disinformation in our runbooks and response plans. Our guest Ron Gula from Gula Tech Adventures shares his thoughts on proper public cyber response to the SolarWinds attack. And should we worry about that White House Peloton? For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/14
Microsoft researchers detail the lengths to which the Solorigate threat actor went to stay undetected and establish persistence. LuckyBoy malvertising is described. Business email compromise as a reconnaissance technique? More reminders about the risks that accompany remote work. Ben Yelin looks at cyber policy issues facing the Biden administration. Rick Howard speaks with Frank Duff from Mitre on their ATT&CK Evaluation Program. And good riddance to the Joker’s Stash (we hope). For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/13
Another security company discloses a brush with the threat actor behind Solorigate. Advice on hardening Microsoft 365 against that same threat actor. Chimera turns out to be interested in airlines as well as semiconductor manufacturing intellectual property. Former President Trump’s last Executive Order addresses foreign exploitation of Infrastructure-as-a-Service products. Joe Carrigan looks at a hardware key vulnerability. Our guest is Chris Eng from Veracode with insights from their State of Software Security report. And investigation of that laptop stolen from the Capitol continues. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/12
The European Medicines Agency says stolen emails about vaccine development were altered before being dumped online. Another backdoor is found associated with the SolarWinds supply chain campaign. DNS cache poisoning vulnerabilities are described. FBI renews warnings about vishing. Iran’s “Enemies of the People” disinformation campaign. Vishing is up. Rick Howard previews his hashtable discussion on Solarigate. Verizon’s Chris Novak looks at cyber espionage. And the FBI makes an arrest in connection with a laptop taken during the Capitol Hill riot. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/11
Well-constructed phishing and smishing are reported out of Tehran. Estimates of SolarWinds compromise insurance payouts. Notes from industry on the convergence of criminal and espionage TTPs. Social engineering hooks baited with greed. Ring patches a bug that could have exposed users’ geolocation (and their reports of crime). Advice on cyber best practices from CISA and NSA. Robert M. Lee has thoughts for the incoming Biden administration. Our guest is Sir David Omand, former Director of GCHQ, on his book, How Spies Think: Ten Lessons in Intelligence. And an ethics officer is accused of cyberstalking. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/10
There are other things going on besides Solorigate and deplatforming. There’s news about the SideWinder threat actor and its interest in South Asian cyberespionage targets. Google’s Project Zero describes a complex and expensive criminal effort. CISA discusses threats to cloud users, and offers some security recommendations. A scam-as-a-service affiliate network spreads from Russia to Europe and North America. Awais Rashid looks at shadow security. Our own Rick Howard speaks with Christopher Ahlberg from Recorded Future on Cyber Threat Intelligence. And SolarLeaks looks more like misdirection, Guccifer 2.0-style. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/9
Speculation grows that the Solarigate threat actors were also behind the Mimecast compromise. SolarLeaks says it has the goods taken from FireEye and SolarWinds, but caveat emptor. Notes on Patch Tuesday. Joe Carrigan has thoughts on a WhatsApp ultimatum. Our guest is Andrew Cheung of 01 Communique with an update on quantum computing. And farewell to an infosec good guy. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/8
A cyberespionage campaign, so far not attributed to any threat actor, continues to prospect government and industry targets in Colombia. A new bit of malware is found in the SolarWinds backdoor compromise. Mimecast certificates are compromised in another apparent software supply chain incident. Ubiquiti tells users to reset their passwords. A brief Capitol Hill riot update. Bidefender releases a free DarkSide ransomware decryptor. Ben Yelin revisits racial bias in facial recognition software. Our guest is Jessi Marcoff from Privitar on trend toward Chief People Officers. And Europol announces the takedown of the DarkMarket. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/7
Similarities are found between Sunburst backdoor code and malware used by Turla. CISA expands advice on dealing with Solorigate. Courts revert to paper...and USB drives. More members of the US Congress report devices stolen during last week’s riot. Online inspiration for violence seems distributed, not centralized. Caleb Barlow examines protocols for handling inbound intel. Rick Howard looks at Solorigate through the lens of first principles. And platforms as publishers? For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/6
Solorigate and its effect on sensitive corporate information. The DC riots show the cybersecurity consequences of brute physical access to systems. A North Korean APT resurfaces with the RokRat Trojan. Ransomware remains very lucrative, and why? Because people continue to pay up. Thomas Etheridge from CrowdStrike on The Role of Outside Counsel in the IR Process.Our guest is Larry Lunetta from Aruba HPE on how enterprises can bolster security in the era of hybrid work environments. And a criminal hacker gets twelve years in US Federal prison. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/8
CISA updates its guidance on Solorigate, and issues an alert that the threat actor may have used attack vectors other than the much-discussed SolarWinds backdoor. Some reports suggest that a widely used development tool produced by a Czech firm may have been compromised. The cyberespionage campaign is now known to have extended to the Department of Justice and the US Federal Courts. Robert M. Lee shares lessons learned from a recent power grid incident in Mumbai. Our guest is Yassir Abousselham from Splunk on how attackers find new ways to exploit emerging technologies. Cyber implications of the Capitol Hill riot. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/4
The US Cyber Unified Coordination Group says the Solorigate APT is “likely Russian in origin.” Threat actors are scanning for systems potentially vulnerable to exploitation through a Zyxel backdoor. ElectroRAT targets crypto wallets. Babuk Locker is called the first new ransomware strain of 2021. The New York Stock Exchange re-reconsiders delisting three Chinese telcos. Joe Carrigan from Johns Hopkins joins us with the latest clever exploits from Ben Gurion University. Our guest is Jens Bothe from OTRS Group the importance of the US establishing standardized data privacy regulations. And Julain Assange is denied bail. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/3
More assessments of the Solorigate affair, with an excursus on Pearl Harbor. Shareholders open a class action suit against SolarWinds, but no signs of an enforcement action for speculated insider trading. Emissary Panda seems to be working an APT side hustle. Kevin Magee has insights from the Microsoft Digital Defense Report. Our guest is Jason Passwaters from Intel 471 with a look at the growing range of ransomware as a service offerings. And to-ing and fro-ing on Chinese telecoms at the New York Stock Exchange. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/2
Updates on the spreading consequences of Solorigate, including Microsoft’s disclosure that threat actors gained access to source code repositories. A hard-coded backdoor is found in Zyxel firewalls and VPNs. Kawasaki Heavy Industries says parties unknown accessed sensitive corporate information. Slack has been having troubles today. Andrea Little Limbago from Interos on democracies aligning against global techno-dictators. Our guest is Drew Daniels from Druva with a look at the true value of data. And a British court declines to extradite WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange to the United States. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/1
On this Special Edition, our extended conversation with author and New York Times national security correspondent David E. Sanger. The Perfect Weapon explores the rise of cyber conflict as the primary way nations now compete with and sabotage one another. ‌
An update on Fancy Bear and its Drovorub rootkit. Karma Panda, a.k.a. CactusPete, is scouting Eastern European financial and military targets with the latest version of a venerable backdoor. How criminals and terrorists exploit COVID-19, and how law enforcement tracks them down. Caleb Barlow from Cynergistek covers security assessments and HIPAA data. Our guest is Ryan Olson from Palo Alto Networks on the 10th Anniversary of Stuxnet. And those celebrity endorsed investment scams aren’t actually endorsed by celebrities, and they’re not actually good investments. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/158
NSA and FBI release a detailed report on a GRU toolset. North Korea’s Operation Dream Job phishes in Israeli waters. CISA warns of COVID-19 loan relief scams. Malek Ben Salem from Accenture with highlights from their 2020 Security Vision report. Our guest is Mike Hamilton from CI Security, who clears the air on election security and the shift to absentee status. And crooks are using infection and job loss as retail phishbait. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/157
Regional rivals tussle in cyberspace, and governments have it out with dissidents and the opposition. Market penetration as an instrument of state power. TikTok gets more unwelcome scrutiny over its privacy practices. Joe Carrigan on a credential harvesting phishing scheme using Zoom as bait. Our guest is Avi Shua from Orca Security on accidental vulnerabilities. And suppressing creepware is apparently harder than it looks. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/156
Belarus shuts down its Internet after its incumbent president’s surprising, perhaps implausible, no...really implausible landslide reelection. Papua New Guinea undergoes buyer’s remorse over that Huawei-built National Data Centre it sprung for a couple of years ago. Versions of Chrome found susceptible to CSP rule bypass. Zoom is taken to court over encryption. Patch Tuesday notes. Ben Yelin looks at mobile surveillance in a Baltimore criminal case. Carole Theriault returns to speak with our guest, Alex Guirakhoo from Digital Shadows with a look at dark web travel agencies. And card-skimmers hit a university’s online store. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/155
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Comments (22)

Vince Fitzpatrick

.k. ti. lm j . . . m.p nm w m .. p ..n n. k .u nm o

Sep 21st
Reply

Allison Phillips

Re: Ransom DDoS episode... not only did that dude mispronounce technology names (indicating lack of technical knowledge), he used the phrase “or their [law enforcement counterparts] in other civilized countries”. In saying this, he effectively implies that hackers who write in broken English are savages from uncivilized countries. The implicit racial connotations in making a statement like that are seriously offensive (equating being ‘civilized’ with speaking English well). Really surprising and disappointing.

Sep 5th
Reply

Debra Dukes

✌Deb.

Jun 13th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Great Podcast, Thank you for sharing Deb.✌

Jun 13th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Excellent Podcast and I'm shocked at this time and point we should have this covered by now.So enjoyed Deb.

Jun 13th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Awesome, Podcast Thanks so much for sharing Deb👍🏼✌

Jun 11th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Larry , Dave I really appreciate all the work and information it's about time that they finally get something done about this.Really enjoyed Deb👌✌

Jun 1st
Reply

Nathan Smith

Bollocks means balls as in testicles. It is a slang term for as you say someone talking nonsense / hogwash Just came across the podcast good stuff 👍👍

Feb 14th
Reply

elrey741

12:07: make sure you are updated to chrome 77

Nov 14th
Reply

Jef Cesar

Ahahaa! Verry well tought off!

Nov 4th
Reply

Міла Тарнопольська

it made my morning! 😊

Nov 4th
Reply (1)

Michael Ford

I have been bingeing this podcast and recommending this to everyone. especially the non tech folks since they are more target prone.

Oct 25th
Reply

s smith

I couldn't help notice how pro-israel the host is over the last few shows

May 16th
Reply

Raju Ghorai

good

Dec 17th
Reply

Tim Debisz

;D <3

Oct 31st
Reply

Argha Bhattacharya

Awesome episode. Ryan Olson spoke so well. Made things simple to understand even for someone who is new to "cryptojacking"

Oct 6th
Reply

Glen Nile

Awesome book list! I'm set for the summer.

Jun 15th
Reply (1)

Jim Maahs

Svc Now survey and discussion about patching, super interesting and informative. Thanks.

May 3rd
Reply

Nathan Katzenstein

excellent podcast. thorough in it's presentation, wide in covered topics and humorous to top it off. A must for Cyber security junkies.

Mar 27th
Reply (1)
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