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The CyberWire

The CyberWire

Author: The CyberWire

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More signal, less noise—we distill the day’s critical cyber security news into a concise daily briefing.
1309 Episodes
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Berserk Bear is back, and snuffling around Germany’s infrastructure. Two new Android issues surface. India opens up the source code for its COVID-19 contact-tracing app as such technological adjuncts to public health continue to arouse privacy concerns. [F]Unicorn poses as Italy’s Immuni app. An alleged FIN7 gangster is arrested. Australia’s Data61 urges companies not to scrimp on R&D. Joe Carrigan on Android mobile malware getting new features. Our guest is Frederick “Flee” Lee from Gusto on CCPA. And does your underwear come with a Faraday cage? We thought it might. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/102
Turla tunes its tools. The commodity Trojan AnarchyGrabber is now stealing passwords. A new iOS jailbreak has been released. The UK reconsiders its decision to allow Huawei into its 5G networks. A tech group lobbies the US House against warrantless inspection of searches. Remote work’s regulatory risk. COVID-19 conspiracy theories. Hackers say they’re vigilantes. Our own Rick Howard on intrusion kill chains, his latest episode of CSO Perspectives. Our guest is Nico Fischbach from Forcepoint on deepfakes expanding outside of disinformation campaigns to the enterprise. And too many remote workers appear to have too much time on their hands. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/101
In December 2019, the GOLD VILLAGE threat group that operates the Maze ransomware created a public website to name and shame victims. The threat actors used the website to dump data they exfiltrated from victims' networks before they deployed the ransomware. Secureworks Counter Threat Unit (CTU) researchers have observed several ransomware operators following suit. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Alex Tilley of SecureWorks' Counter Threat Unit.  The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
Indonesia’s election database has leaked, and PII is for sale in the dark web. Phishing campaigns abuse Firebase. The Shiny Hunters are selling Mathway user records. US agencies warn of COVID-19-themed criminal campaigns. Contact tracing technology hits a rough patch. Johannes Ullrich from SANS on phishing PDFs with incremental updates. Our guest is author Peter Singer on his new book, Burn-In. And what are you going to do when you return to the workplace? If, that is, you’ve left the workplace at all, and if you’re in fact ever going to return? For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/100
Website defacements in Israel may be hacktivist work. Iranian cyberespionage against Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The latest evolution of ZeuS. The Winnti Group is still hacking, and it still likes stealing in-game commodities. Contact tracing during the pandemic proves harder than many thought it would be. Economic trends for the security sector as it prepares to emerge from the general state of emergency. Caleb Barlow wonders if GDPR may have unintended consequences for stopping COVID-19 scammers. Gabriel Bassett from Verizon on the 2020 DBIR. And if you’re looking for qualified workers, follow the layoff news. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/98
Cyber spies steal prototype missile data. Others hack into South Asian telecoms, and still others go after easyJet passengers’ travel data. Cyberattacks, misinformation, and cyber fraud continue to follow the COVID-19 pandemic. Joe Carrigan weighs in on the Thunderspy vulnerability. Our guest is James Dawson with insights on DMARK threats and why it’s worse during COVID-19. And think twice before you post, no matter how good or bad you think the beer is. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/98
Foreign intelligence services attribute a recent cyberattack on an Iranian port to Israeli operators. EasyJet discloses a breach of passenger information. Verizon’s annual Data Breach Report is out, and it finds more errors than it does exploits. A look at the Dark Web during the pandemic. US authorities warn local law enforcement to watch for misinformation-driven telecom vandalism. Ben Yelin explains why the ACLU is suing Baltimore over a surveillance plane. Our guest is Robb Reck from Ping Identity on a recent CISO Advisory Council meeting regarding the sudden shift to working from home. And REvil is still offering celebrity dirt for sale...if they’ve actually got any. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/97
European supercomputers were hacked by cryptominers. UK electrical power distributor recovers from its cyberattack. A database containing personal data related to the EU Parliament is found exposed. REvil says it’s got the celebrity goods, but has yet to show its hand. The US and China move into a new round of trade and security conflict. Justin Harvey shares insights on how companies are adjusting to the new remote working environment and the impacts to their security posture. Our guest is Ehsan Foroughi from SecurityCompass on compliance issues. And catphishing with some pretty implausible impersonations of US Army generals. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/96
Section 52, CyberX’s threat intelligence team, has uncovered an ongoing industrial cyberespionage campaign targeting hundreds of manufacturing and other industrial firms primarily located in South Korea. CyberX has identified more than 200 compromised systems from this campaign, including one belonging to a multi-billion dollar Korean conglomerate that manufactures critical infrastructure equipment such as heavy equipment for power transmission and distribution facilities, renewable energy, chemical plants, welding, and construction. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Phil Neray, one of the authors of this report.  The research can be found here: Gangnam Industrial Style: APT Campaign Targets Korean Industrial Companies Thanks to our sponsor, Reservoir Labs. 
More malware designed for air-gapped systems. A British utility sustains a ransomware attack. The US Cyberspace Solarium Commission sees lessons in the pandemic for cybersecurity. Contact-tracing technologies take a step back,maybe a step or two forward. Rob Lee from Dragos comparing the state of ICS security around the world, our guest is Ian Pitt from LogMeIn on lessons learned working remotely during COVID-19. Criminals increase ransomware attacks on hospitals, and swap templates to impersonate government relief agencies. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/95
ARCHER goes offline after a security incident. Scammers smish victims with bogus contact-tracing messages. Ramsay malware goes after air-gapped systems. Ako ransomware now places a surcharge on deletion of stolen data. Google boots creepware apps with the help of the CreepRank algorithm. Johannes Ullrich explains that when it comes to malicious binaries bypassing anti-malware filters, size matters. Our guest is Pat Craven, Director of the Center for Cyber Safety and Education on the security social media apps. And kooky 5G conspiracists go after cell towers in the US. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/93
Ransomware continues to steal personal information. Notes on Patch Tuesday--and please, by all means patch. The FBI says it’s investigating cyberespionage directed against COVID-19 researchers (and US officials see direct data corruption in espionage). And the AI doesn’t really know what to make of us any more. Joe Carrigan from JHU ISI on Twitter’s response to 5G related Coronavirus conspiracy theories, our guest is Chris Cochran from Netflix on the importance of personal health and safety. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/93
Unattributed cyberattacks in an Iranian port prompt speculation that a broader cyberwar in the Middle East may be in the offing. CISA releases malware analysis reports on North Korea’s Hidden Cobra. Astaroth malware grows more evasive (and it was already pretty good at hiding). Texas courts sustain a ransomware attack. COVID-19 espionage warnings are on the way. Twitter’s misinformation warning system. Ben Yelin describes a Fourth Amendment case on automated license plate reader (ALPR) databases. Our guest is Brian Dye from Corelight on dealing with encrypted traffic without compromising privacy. And taking down Plandemic’s trailer. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/92
A cyberattack with kinetic effect. Shiny Hunters post more stolen wares online. Thunderspy and evil maids. Some developing background to the US bulk power state-of-emergency Executive Order. Contact tracing apps: reliability, privacy, security, familiarity, and rates of adoption all raise questions. The economic consequences of the pandemic emergency. Caleb Barlow from CynergisTek on Alan Brunacini’s concept of an Incident Action Plan, our guest is James Yeager from CrowdStrike on their Global Threat Report. And the reappearance of the yellow press in social media. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_11.html
This week's CSO Perspectives is the first in a series of shows about cybersecurity strategy. Rick Howard discusses the concept of first principles as an organizing principle and how the technique can be applied to cybersecurity to build a foundational wall of infosec practices that are so fundamental as to be self-evident; so elementary that no expert in the field can argue against them; so crucial to our understanding that without them, the infrastructure that holds our accepted best practice disintegrates like sand castles against the watery tide.
Multiple media reports have indicated that the United States’ (U.S.) 2020 general election could be targeted by foreign and domestic actors after the successful cyber and misinformation attacks during the 2016 general election. The responsibility of secure and ethical online campaigning has become a central issue in the 2020 election. In some cases, it has become part of candidate platforms. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Paul Gagliardi from Security Scorecard, discussing their recent report detailing the cybersecurity of the 2020 Presidential race.  The research can be found here: 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates Get Smart to Cybersecurity Report The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
Naikon has returned from four years in the shadows to snoop around the shores of the South China Sea. Tencent trains censorship algorithms on WeChat. Snake ransomware is back, making its way through the healthcare sector. Seeing Charming Kitten's pawprints in World Health Organization networks. Voting security during (or even after) a pandemic. Malek Ben Salem from Accenture on their Technology Vision report, our guest is Thomas Rid from Johns Hopkins University on his book, Active Measures. And unemployed workers are offered gigs as money mules. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_08.html
A new Monero miner is out and about. Hidden Cobra is pushing a RAT through a Trojanized two-factor authentication app. The rise and fall of a botnet. Markets, criminal and legitimate, react to the pandemic. Ransomware hits Taiwan. Remcos is resurgent. Michael Sechrist from BAH on where things are headed with ransomware, our guest is Rachael Stockton from LastPass on their Psychology of Passwords report. And, despite what you saw on Twitter when you were “doing your own research,” 5G does not cause COVID-19, and telecom repair crews are not agents of the Illuminati. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_07.html
Facebook reports on the coordinated inauthenticity it took down in April. Investigations into COVID-19’s origins continue, as does medical espionage. Contact tracing’s challenges. Joe Carrigan from JHU ISI on recent flaws in antivirus products, our guests are Laura Deimling and Courtney Wandeloski from Down To Staff on interviewing tips for employees and hiring managers. And European police take down the BlackInfinity credential traffickers. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_06.html
A pretty Fancy Bear hunt in Germany. A new IoT botnet surfaces. Cryptojackers exploit a Salt bug. Bribing an insider as a way to get personal data. The UK’s NCSC and the US CISA issue a joint warning about campaigns directed against institutions working on a response to COVID-19. Britain’s contact tracing app starts its trial on the Isle of Wight. Ben Yelin from UMD CHHS on AI inventions and their pending patents, our guest is Matt Glenn from Illumio on why companies should break up with their firewalls. And don’t get puppy scammed--you’re looking for wags in all the wrong places. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_05.html
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Comments (14)

Nathan Smith

Bollocks means balls as in testicles. It is a slang term for as you say someone talking nonsense / hogwash Just came across the podcast good stuff 👍👍

Feb 14th
Reply

elrey741

12:07: make sure you are updated to chrome 77

Nov 14th
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Jef Cesar

Ahahaa! Verry well tought off!

Nov 4th
Reply

Міла Тарнопольська

it made my morning! 😊

Nov 4th
Reply (1)

Michael Ford

I have been bingeing this podcast and recommending this to everyone. especially the non tech folks since they are more target prone.

Oct 25th
Reply

s smith

I couldn't help notice how pro-israel the host is over the last few shows

May 16th
Reply

Raju Ghorai

good

Dec 17th
Reply

Tim Debisz

;D <3

Oct 31st
Reply

Argha Bhattacharya

Awesome episode. Ryan Olson spoke so well. Made things simple to understand even for someone who is new to "cryptojacking"

Oct 6th
Reply

Glen Nile

Awesome book list! I'm set for the summer.

Jun 15th
Reply (1)

Jim Maahs

Svc Now survey and discussion about patching, super interesting and informative. Thanks.

May 3rd
Reply

Nathan Katzenstein

excellent podcast. thorough in it's presentation, wide in covered topics and humorous to top it off. A must for Cyber security junkies.

Mar 27th
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