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The CyberWire

The CyberWire

Author: The CyberWire

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More signal, less noise—we distill the day’s critical cyber security news into a concise daily briefing.
1136 Episodes
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The UK’s Labour Party says it was hacked, but unsuccessfully. The Lazarus Group seems to be back out and about, and apparently interested in India. The Platinum threat actor continues to prospect Southeast Asian targets with stealthy malware, and a new backdoor. Buran tries to take black market share in the ransomware-as-a-service souk. Paycard standard compliance is down. And is that a spy ship we see, or are you just looking at the seabed, all for science? Joe Carrigan from JHU ISI with browser vulnerabilities in Chrome and Firefox.
In this CyberWire special edition, a conversation with Andy Greenberg, senior writer at WIRED and author of the new book "Sandworm -  A New Era of CyberWar and the Hunt for the Kremlin’s Most Dangerous Hackers." It’s a thrilling investigation of the Olympic Destroyer malware, and an accounting of the new era in which we find ourselves, where nation states can target their adversaries critical infrastructure, and the often unintended consequences that follow. Thanks to our sponsors McAfee, the device-to-cloud cybersecurity company. 
Researchers from Palo Alto Networks' Unit 42 have been tracking a Chinese cyber espionage group they've named PKPLUG. The group mainly targets victims in the Southeast Asia region. Ryan Olson is VP of threat intelligence at Palo Alto Networks, and he joins us to share their findings. The original research is here: https://unit42.paloaltonetworks.com/pkplug_chinese_cyber_espionage_group_attacking_asia/ The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
Warnings and advice about Emotet and BlueKeep, both being actively used or exploited in the wild. Two new carding bots are in circulation against e-commerce sites. Expect more of this as criminals test stolen credentials in advance of the holiday shopping season. Amazon fixes a security flaw in its Ring doorbell. A Long Island company is charged with selling bad Chinese security systems as good made-in-USA articles. Michael Sechrist from BAH on preventing supply chain attacks. Guest is Andy Greenberg, senior writer at Wired an author of the book Sandworm — A new era of cyberwar and the hunt for the Kremlin’s most dangerous hackers. For links to all of today's stories check our our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2019/November/CyberWire_2019_11_08.html  Support our show
The US off-off-year elections seem to have gone off largely free of interference, but officials caution that major foreign influence campaigns can be expected in 2020. Three former Twitter employees are charged with spying for Saudi Arabia. The website defacement campaign in Georgia remains unattributed. Google boots seven adware droppers from the Play Store. Phishers are using web analytics for better hauls. And nation-states are targeting unpatched Confluence. Johannes Ullrich from the SANS Technology Institute on encrypted SNI in TLS 1.3 and how that can be used for domain fronting. Guest is Kevin O’Brien from GreatHorn on managing email threats. For links to all of today's stories check our our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2019/November/CyberWire_2019_11_07.html  Support our show
Facebook closes a hole in Group data access. US authorities seek to reassure Congress and the public concerning the security of election infrastructure. Disinformation remains a challenge, however, as the US prepares for the 2020 elections. Criminals catch Potomac fever as they use politicians’ names and likenesses as an aid to distributing malware. Kaspersky outlines the now-shuttered DarkUniverse campaign. And Nikkei America loses millions to a BEC scam. Justin Harvey from Accenture on automated incident response. Carole Theriault speaks with Kristen Poulos from Tripwire on protecting the IoT. For links to all of today's stories check our our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2019/November/CyberWire_2019_11_06.html  Support our show
Ransomware hits Spanish companies. Pegasus continues to excite controversy in India. TikTok applies for Big Tech’s good-citizen club, but has apparently so far been blackballed. Booz Allen offers nine predictions for 2020: balkanization, supply chain threats, automotive data theft, war-droning, satellite hacks, tougher attribution, election interference, missiles against malware, and Olympic interference. And good dogs go after bad guys’ data storage devices. Ben Yelin from UMD CHHS on AT&T’s claims that they cannot be sued for selling location data to bounty hunters. For links to all of today's stories check our our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2019/November/CyberWire_2019_11_05.html  Support our show
BlueKeep is being exploited in the wild, not too seriously, yet, but you should still patch. Nunavut’s government is recovering from a ransomware attack is sustained Saturday morning. The NSO Group controversy spreads into an Indian politcal dust-up. Different Magecart groups are found to be be independently hitting the same victims. GandCrab provided a new template for the cyber underworld. And US Cyber Command deploys to Montenegro. Joe Carrigan with thoughts on the Coalfire pentesters criminal case. For links to all of today's stories check our our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2019/November/CyberWire_2019_11_04.html  Support our show
What’s an insider threat? Loosely, it’s a threat that operates from within your organization. In this CyberWire special edition, our UK correspondent Carole Theriault speaks with experts who’ll talk us through the different ways insider threats manifest themselves.  A quick note - when Carole interviewed Dr. Richard Ford he was with Forcepoint. He’s since moved on to Cyren. Thanks to our special edition sponsor, Okta. 
Until recently, usability was often an afterthought when developing security tools. These days there's growing realization that usability is a fundamental part of security. Lorrie Cranor is director of the CyLab Usable Privacy and Security lab (CUPS) at Carnegie Mellon University. She shares the work she's been doing with her colleagues and students to improve security through usability. The research can be found here: https://www.cylab.cmu.edu/news/2019/07/29-usability-history.html The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
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Comments (12)

Jef Cesar

Ahahaa! Verry well tought off!

Nov 4th
Reply

Міла Тарнопольська

it made my morning! 😊

Nov 4th
Reply (1)

Michael Ford

I have been bingeing this podcast and recommending this to everyone. especially the non tech folks since they are more target prone.

Oct 25th
Reply

s smith

I couldn't help notice how pro-israel the host is over the last few shows

May 16th
Reply

Raju Ghorai

good

Dec 17th
Reply

Tim Debisz

;D <3

Oct 31st
Reply

Argha Bhattacharya

Awesome episode. Ryan Olson spoke so well. Made things simple to understand even for someone who is new to "cryptojacking"

Oct 6th
Reply

Glen Nile

Awesome book list! I'm set for the summer.

Jun 15th
Reply (1)

Jim Maahs

Svc Now survey and discussion about patching, super interesting and informative. Thanks.

May 3rd
Reply

Nathan Katzenstein

excellent podcast. thorough in it's presentation, wide in covered topics and humorous to top it off. A must for Cyber security junkies.

Mar 27th
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