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Over the weekend, an 18-year-old man livestreamed himself shooting 13 people and killing 10. Within hours it became clear that the shooter’s intent was to kill as many Black people as possible. The suspect wrote online that he was motivated by replacement theory — a racist idea that white people are deliberately being replaced by people of color in places like America and Europe. What are the origins of this theory, and how has it become simultaneously more extreme and more mainstream?Guest: Nicholas Confessore, a political and investigative reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Replacement theory, a fringe conspiracy fostered online and espoused by the suspect in the Buffalo massacre, has been embraced by some right-wing politicians and commentators.Here are our updates on the Buffalo shooting and the aftermath. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The Times journalist Caity Weaver was tasked by her editor to go on an adventure: With an old college friend she would spend a week in California, living out of a converted camper van, in pursuit of the aesthetic fantasy known as #VanLife.Given the discomfort that can arise even in the plushiest of vehicles, it’s a surprising trend that shows no sign of letting up. As Weaver explains, even the idea of living full time out of a vehicle has “become aspirational for a subset of millennials and Zoomers, despite the fact that, traditionally, residing in a car or van is usually an action taken as a last resort, from want of other options to protect oneself from the elements.”Unpacking the craze by testing it herself, Weaver offers a humorous account of the trials of not being adequately prepared, claustrophobia, long restaurant lines, the increase in traffic within the national parks, and the disappointment that occurs when an Instagram aesthetic bumps up against reality. Sometimes fantasies are too good to be true.This story was written by Caity Weaver and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
One Million

One Million

2022-05-1330:417

This episode contains strong language. Hilma Wolitzer lost her husband, Morty Wolitzer, a psychologist who loved cooking and jazz, on April 11, 2020. They had been together for 68 years.Mary-Margaret Waterbury’s uncle Michael Mantlo had introduced her to Nirvana, grunge and Elvis Costello.After Terrie Martin’s first born, April Marie Dawson, died at age 43, Ms. Martin said she carried around guilt for not taking more precautions. “I killed my daughter,” she said. “And I have learned nothing from loss.”Carmen Nitsche’s mother, Carmen Dolores Nitsche, died on May 14, 2020. They were only a few miles apart, but she said she was unable to hold her mother’s hand on her final journey.In the coming days, the number of known deaths from Covid-19 in the United States is expected to reach one million.We asked listeners to share memories about loved ones they have lost — and about what it’s like to grieve when it seems like the rest of the world is trying to move on.“Time keeps moving forward, and the world desperately wants to move past this pandemic,” one told us. “But my mother — she’s still gone.”Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: As the United States approaches a Covid toll that only hints at the suffering of millions more Americans mourning loved ones, President Biden urged vigilance against a virus that has “forever changed” the country.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Fresh data from the U.S. government on Wednesday showed that inflation was still climbing at a rapid pace, prompting President Biden to say that controlling the rising prices was his “top domestic priority.”But not everybody experiences inflation equally. Why is that?Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics and business reporter for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: What’s your rate of inflation? You can answer seven questions to estimate your personal inflation rate here.Rising prices could hurt Democrats in the midterms, and Mr. Biden has sought to turn the debate over the economy against his opponents.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.  In Part 1 of our two-part series, we spoke to anti-abortion activists about their preparations for a future without Roe v. Wade.Today, we talk to people working in abortion clinics about what the potential change could mean for their patients.“Everybody’s scared,” said one provider from Oklahoma. “Every single person that walks in our clinic, you can see the fear on their faces.”Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Half of women in the United States could lose access to abortion without Roe v. Wade.Here’s how Democrats in Congress are trying to protect abortion rights.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
For years, President Vladimir V. Putin has taken advantage of Victory Day — when Russians commemorate the Soviet triumph over Nazi Germany — to champion his country’s military might and project himself as a leader of enormous power.This year, he drew on the pageantry of May 9 for an even more pressing goal: making the case for the war in Ukraine.Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Victory Day in Moscow this year was set up to be a lavish government-orchestrated show of Russian strength and a claim of rightful dominance over a lost empire.Mr. Putin delivered a speech in which he vowed that the military would keep fighting to rid Ukraine, in his false telling, of “torturers, death squads and Nazis.”For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
This episode contains descriptions of suicide. Over the past five years, a series of investigations by The Times has revealed the terror and tragedy that America’s air wars, despite being promoted as the most precise in history, have brought to civilians on the ground.The program has also exacted a heavy toll on the military personnel guiding the drones to their targets. They include soldiers such as Capt. Kevin Larson, a decorated pilot, who died by suicide after a drug arrest and court-martial.For suicide prevention resources in the United States, go to SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources. Go here for resources outside the United States.Guest: Dave Philipps, a national correspondent covering the military for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Captain Larson was one of the best drone pilots in the U.S. Air Force. Yet as the job weighed on him and untold others, the military failed to recognize its full impact.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
It was meant to mark the start of their lives out of college, but the adventure quickly turned into a nightmare. Beginning with what seemed to be a lucky whale sighting, three friends set out on a sea-kayaking trip through Glacier Bay National Park in Alaska, watching out for bears, and having a good time, when tragedy struck.In recounting the days preceding and following the accident, which seriously injured one of his friends, the Times journalist Jon Mooallem explains how he was forced to reckon with his fears. Detailing the incident’s surprising repercussions, he muses on the importance of overcoming one’s fears, and finding poetry in life’s darkest moments.This story was written by Jon Mooallem. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Today, we revisit a two-part series that first ran in 2018 about the history of Roe v. Wade and the woman behind it.Almost 50 years ago, when the Supreme Court first ruled that women had the constitutional right to an abortion, it was met with little controversy.In Part 2, we asked: How, then, did abortion become one of the most controversial issues of our time?Guest: Sabrina Tavernise, co-host of The Daily. As a correspondent in 2018, she reported on the story of Roe v. Wade.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading:Norma McCorvey, the “Jane Roe” of Roe v. Wade who became a divisive icon for both sides of the abortion debate, died in 2017 at the age of 69.What would the end of Roe mean? Here are some key questions and answers.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 
This week, the release of a draft Supreme Court opinion striking down Roe v. Wade has put a spotlight on the 50-year-old case that redefined abortion in America.Today, we revisit a two-part series that first ran in 2018 about the history of the case and the woman behind it.In Part 1, the story of Jane Roe.Guest: Sabrina Tavernise, co-host of The Daily. As a correspondent in 2018, she reported on the story of Roe v. Wade.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading:The leaked draft opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade also takes aim at its version of history, challenging decades of scholarship that argues abortion was not always a crime.Remembering a time before Roe: When New York legalized abortion in 1970, three years before the landmark ruling, hundreds of thousands of women traveled there from other states for the procedure.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
Since the leak of the Supreme Court draft opinion on overturning the constitutional right to abortion, both sides of the fight have been scrambling.Today, in the first of two parts, we speak to anti-abortion activists such as Michael Gonidakis, president of Ohio Right to Life, about what comes next.“It’s been a whirlwind,” he said. “We’re in uncharted territory.”Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: For half a century, right-wing legal thinkers have been working toward the moment foretold by the leaked draft.Democrats aim to use abortion rights to jolt state legislative races.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
If the Supreme Court revokes Roe v. Wade, individual states will probably be left to make their own decisions about abortion provision.Some states will ban abortion, and some will continue to allow it. And then there is a third group: swing states, where a final decision will be up for grabs.Guest: Margot Sanger-Katz, a domestic correspondent covering health care for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Who gets abortions in the United States?What are trigger laws? And which states have them?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Is This How Roe Ends?

Is This How Roe Ends?

2022-05-0429:5913

The revelation that the Supreme Court could end the constitutional right to abortion in the United States has set off a political firestorm and deepened divisions about one of the most contentious issues in American society.What exactly is in the draft opinion that was leaked this week, and what does it mean for the court and for the country?Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Here are some key questions and answers about the possible effects of ending Roe v. Wade.If the Supreme Court does overturn the ruling, where would abortion be banned?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The Mar-a-Lago Midterms

The Mar-a-Lago Midterms

2022-05-0335:587

Unlike other former presidents after leaving office, Donald J. Trump has remained in the middle of the political stage — raising more money than the Republican Party itself and doling out coveted endorsements.Who has Mr. Trump backed in the midterms? And to what lengths have candidates gone to secure his favor?Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Inspiring fear, hoarding cash, doling out favors and seeking to crush rivals, Mr. Trump is behaving more like an old-time political boss than a typical former president.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
The United States is seeing a revival in union membership.In the last six months, the National Labor Relations Board has recorded a 60 percent increase in workers filing for petitions that allow for union elections to take place.The circumstances that have prompted these unionization efforts have some similarities with the period that brought the largest gain in union membership in U.S. history, during the 1930s.What can that era tell us about today, and are current efforts just a blip?Guest: Noam Scheiber, a reporter covering workers and the workplace for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Since the Great Recession, the college-educated have taken more frontline jobs at companies like Starbucks and Amazon. Now they’re helping to unionize them.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
Is there a connection between former President Donald J. Trump’s pressure campaign on Ukraine, the Russian invasion and the events of Jan. 6, 2021?The journalist Robert Draper talked to Fiona Hill, John Bolton and other former Trump advisers to gauge the extent to which the ex-president’s actions had a ripple effect.This story was written by Robert Draper and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. 
As the horrors of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine have became clearer, the Biden administration has pivoted to a more aggressive stance, with officials talking about constraining Moscow as a global power.But that is an escalation, and escalations can go wrong.Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The United States toughened its messaging on the Ukraine war, saying that the American aim was not just to thwart the Russian invasion but also to weaken Russia so it could no longer carry out such military aggression anywhere.The change in stance could signal a situation that pits Washington more directly against Moscow.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new data that showed around 60 percent of Americans — more than half of adults and three quarters of children — have now been infected with the coronavirus. But herd immunity looks likely to remain elusive, and many people are still at high risk from Covid-19.What do the C.D.C. figures mean for immunity in the United States, and for the future of the pandemic?Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Sixty percent of Americans, including 75 percent of children, had been infected with the coronavirus by February — another remarkable milestone in a pandemic that continues to confound expectations.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Joseph A. Kennedy, a former high school football coach, was fired after he made a habit of going to the 50-yard line after his team’s games to thank God and to lead his players in prayer.On Monday, the Supreme Court heard his suit. The justice’s decision in the complex case could make a major statement about the role religion may play in public life.Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Coaching was his calling, Mr. Kennedy said. But after the school board in Bremerton, Wash., told him to stop mixing football and faith on the field, he left his job and sued.Members of the Supreme Court’s conservative majority indicated that Mr. Kennedy had a constitutional right to pray after games.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
In January 2021, one of President Biden’s first big moves in office was to sign an executive order mandating masks in airports and on planes and other forms of public transit.But an unexpected ruling from a judge in Florida has abruptly and unexpectedly overturned that mandate — and the implications of the decision could tie the government’s hands when it comes to future health emergencies.Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, a Washington correspondent covering health policy for The New York Times; and Heather Murphy, a reporter covering travel for The Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In the end, the mask mandate was brought down by a little-known nonprofit, a conservative judge, and chance.While the C.D.C. wants to keep the mandate intact, appealing the ruling is risky: If the Florida decision is upheld, it could permanently weaken the agency’s authority.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
Comments (5734)

ID17606932

Moving down to the river in the Van was a tagline my entire life

May 15th
Reply

Moises Bernal

"let's get an opinion about Van life from person who hates driving and camping " said no one ever

May 15th
Reply

ID17606932

My moms friend in is 80's got out of his ticket because of the advancing technology

May 14th
Reply

THE WALKING DEAD

ITcosts everything

May 13th
Reply

Adrian Rodriguez

Why is no one talking about how corporations are increasing their prices higher than inflation to keep higher and higher profits? This is obviously contributing to inflation.

May 12th
Reply

Karen West

One of the women they interviewed said her friend was questioning whether to keep her pregnancy and she was there for her but "wanted it to be her decision". So it's ok for your friend to make her own decision about her body but no one else should have the right? Where's the follow up NYT??

May 12th
Reply

Joseph Walker

why not talk about the small far right groups that are being armed by the Ukrainians in Eastern Ukraine? seems relevant to the story and comes across as poor reporting.

May 11th
Reply

Ida Rødsand

we need to protect and support these doctors at all costs. i feel like we're living in Gilead, episode 1.

May 11th
Reply

Hap Leon

Note to Jon Mooallem ("It was just a kayak trip") : There are people living on one of those "uninhabited islands" you mention on the south side of Inian Pass. I was one of them. From the 1970's through just a few years ago, there was a group of commercial fishermen AND fisherwomen, and their families and friends living at the Hobbit Hole on Inian Island. We would fish for salmon in the passes and surrounding waters all summer long, sometimes glued to the radar to navigate in the fog, and sometimes white-knuckled when we'd hit big seas or more often a big tide rip, but more often not, and with congenial enough weather and seas that we could focus on our fishing. And those passes you describe as so treacherous? We'd cross them almost every day to go sell our fish, to buy fuel and groceries, and to pick up the mail. I even took my then 80-year-old father out in a little 13-foot skiff for a sunny calm afternoon of whale-watching in Inian Pass. You must have just been there on a bad day (and there are plenty of those, too). It's a good story you wrote, though. I enjoyed every minute of it, and had no trouble visualizing the scene. Keep up the good writing.

May 10th
Reply

snosaer

so ..fucked up😥

May 10th
Reply

Becka Buchananan

I loved this story!

May 8th
Reply

morris touriel

it's pretty clear there are no individuals interviewed who would be most impacted by the change in law the most. Poor reporting Daily.

May 8th
Reply

Matthew Cibellis

The crazy sentence out of that 64 year old's mouth! wow. what a pig is: how bad things happen to good people. "It's about what we do with those women who cross state lines to get an abortion." What a foul creep. Hey, at least he admitted what he's really thinking. May he live very uncomfortably with his Orwellian viciousness. The vileness in his heart: he knows what he's saying. He smiled like a Cheshire cat: well try to help them. Repugnant in the extreme. And he signals his intentions in such a lovely, sweet way. Makes me I want him to my 4 year old's bday. Yet then again, sad about what he'd do to that 4 year old.

May 7th
Reply

Terri Temelini

What I don't hear from these people are solutions to support mothers and babies after they are born. The pro-life argument is theoretical and censors women. I love this podcast and I'm assuming you are doing your part for balanced journalism, but this beyond difficult to listen to. If abortion does not align with your beliefs, that is completely your perogative, but in no way does any group have any right to tell another woman what to do. Do they advocate as much for death row inmates? Or are those lives not worth as much anymore?

May 7th
Reply

Cody Buttron

So basically you want to put check points on the Missouri border to hurras any pregnant woman heading out of state to make sure she's not leaving Gilliad... I mean Missouri to have an abortion.

May 6th
Reply

Jel K

men... *facepalm*

May 6th
Reply

Ida Rødsand

These people disgust me, for lack of a better word. what a bunch of self-righteous neanderthals.

May 6th
Reply

Chad Reickard

seriously?

May 6th
Reply

GoatDuckHorseElf

Police do nothing more than take a report if my garage or car is broken into or stolen, but I risk dying if my taillight is out or my registration lapses because the officer is terrified. So stop petty traffic stops, how is that foolish? Wait, it's a huge source of revenue for departments. #PoliceBrutality

May 5th
Reply

GoatDuckHorseElf

Pathetic.

May 4th
Reply
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