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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

868 Episodes
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The outbreak of the coronavirus in Louisiana has become one of the most explosive in the country. Today, we explore how New Orleans became a petri dish for the virus, why Mardi Gras was likely to have been an accelerator for the spread of infections and what it is like now inside the city’s hospitals. Guest: Yanti Turang, a nurse in New Orleans. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: As Mardi Gras came to a close, patients with mysterious respiratory illnesses began appearing in hospitals — many who had not recently left the country. The first Covid-19 diagnosis soon followed.
Bernie Sanders has suspended his 2020 presidential campaign, marking the end of a quest to the White House that began five years ago. We look at why Sanders is calling his campaign an ideological victory, and how he plans to champion his messages as a senator working with the Democratic Party.“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
A Crisis Inside the Navy

A Crisis Inside the Navy

2020-04-0825:3835

Note: This episode contains strong language.The upheaval and anguish caused by the pandemic led to a series of actions that cost both the captain of an aircraft carrier and the head of the Navy their jobs. Today, we explore how the coronavirus has created a crisis inside the service.Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In a letter that leaked to the news media, Capt. Brett E. Crozier described what he said were the Navy’s failures to provide the resources to combat the virus spreading aboard his aircraft carrier. Now the captain himself has tested positive for Covid-19.Thomas B. Modly, acting Navy secretary, condemned the ousted captain to his former crew on the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt. Days later, Mr. Modly resigned.
Against the advice of public health officials and the wishes of its own governor, Wisconsin will hold its Democratic primary today — in the middle of a pandemic. So how did that happen? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The political and legal fight between Wisconsin’s conservative state legislature and its Democratic governor was only the first round of an expected national fight over voting rights during the coronavirus crisis.
To contain the pandemic, the U.S. government has brought the economy to a halt. Today, we explore one result of their containment efforts: one of the worst unemployment crises in American history. Guest: Jim Tankersley, a reporter covering economic and tax policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The national unemployment rate is probably around 13 percent, The Times estimated. “Scary things are going on in our life right now,” one idled Lyft driver said.Whole sectors of the U.S. economy have gone dark to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Here’s what comes next.
On this week’s “Sunday Read,” the magazine writer Jack Hitt introduces his story of how one 1960s bondage-film actress waged legal combat with a toy company for ownership over her husband’s mail-order aquatic-pet empire. The story is as crazy as it sounds.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Today, we’re sharing an excerpt from a new Times audio series called “Sugar Calling,” hosted by the best-selling author Cheryl Strayed. Each week, Cheryl will call a writer she admires in search of insight and courage. She’s turning to some of the most prolific writers of our time — all over the age of 60 — to ask the questions on all our minds: How do we stay calm when everything has been upended? How do we muster courage when fear is all around us?To start, Cheryl reaches out to the author George Saunders, her old friend and mentor."Sugar Calling" is a new podcast by The New York Times. You can listen to the full version of the first episode here.
In recent years, governors have sat on the sidelines as the federal government has commanded most of the attention and airtime. Today, we explore how the pandemic has generated a revival of state and local politics — and made governors into national heroes. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Governors of both parties have taken a lead role in confronting the crisis, asserting themselves in ways that have only highlighted the initial lack of seriousness from the White House.With his widely watched coronavirus briefings, one governor in particular has stood out: Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo. Here’s how the leader of New York State has become a figurehead for the Democratic Party.
Today, we speak with Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s leading expert on infectious diseases, about his experience in the trenches of the government’s response to the coronavirus crisis. “We are in a war. I mean, I actually think this is exactly what generals or leaders in real, you know, violent combat wars feel.”For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Dr. Fauci has been clear about the need to practice social distancing to contain the spread of the virus, but that stance has made him the target of online conspiracy theorists.This week, scientists with the coronavirus task force used models to deliver an update on the expected spread of the disease, projecting the coronavirus could kill up to 240,000 Americans. They pledged to do everything possible to reduce that number.
The Race for a Vaccine

The Race for a Vaccine

2020-04-0126:4246

Scientists are racing to make a vaccine for the coronavirus, collaborating across borders in what is usually a secretive and competitive field. But their cooperation has been complicated by national leaders trying to buy first claim on any breakthrough. Today, we explore how the fight to own a future coronavirus vaccine is revealing the boundaries of international solidarity.Guest: Katrin Bennhold, Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, spoke with Lidia Oostvogels, who researches infectious diseases with the German biotech company CureVac. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The United States says it will share any vaccine breakthroughs with the world. So why did President Trump reportedly try to purchase a German biotech company that is trying to develop a shot for the coronavirus?The latest updates from top U.S. government scientists project that the coronavirus could kill 100,000 to 240,000 Americans — even with strict social distancing.
States and cities across the United States are reporting dangerous shortages of the vital medical supplies needed to contain the coronavirus. Why is the world’s biggest economy suffering such a scramble to find lifesaving equipment?Guest: Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter covering health care for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The scarcity of ventilators has become an emergency, forcing doctors to make life-or-death decisions. The collapse of a government effort to produce an emergency stockpile reveals much about the challenges now being faced in fighting the pandemic.This map of the United States shows gaps in the existing health care infrastructure — and which areas may face a shortage of hospital beds as the virus spreads.
Back From the Brink

Back From the Brink

2020-03-3033:5751

Across the United States, many hospitals are confronting their first cases of coronavirus. Today, we speak to New Jersey’s first confirmed coronavirus patient, a medical professional, about what having the virus was like for him, what he learned from the experience and why he thinks, “America is not ready.”Guests: Susan Dominus, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, spoke with James Cai, a physician assistant. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: James Cai was told his test for coronavirus had not been completed. Then he heard from the governor on the news that he was the first confirmed case in New Jersey. Why states must ask knotty questions about how much to tell the public — and when.President Trump, listening to his health advisers, has said that the country should be practicing social distancing until at least the end of April. Here are the latest updates.
After weeks of caring for her sick husband, our colleague wanted to write an essay about her family’s battle against the coronavirus — a warning to those in isolation who haven’t experienced the ravages of the virus intimately. Today, we read her letter from the future aloud.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Jody Rosen, a writer for The Times Magazine, transports us into his current soundtrack. From Alberta Hunter's “voice of longevity” to the “transfixing performance” of Missy Elliott, Jody shares the music that’s helping him find new rhythms — during these days stuck inside.Music discussed:“My Castle’s Rockin’” by Alberta Hunter“I’ll Get By” by Nick Lucas“Lick Shots” by Missy Elliott“Simply Beautiful” by Al Green
Over the last few weeks, children have called into “The Daily” with a lot of questions about the coronavirus: How did the virus get on earth? What color is coronavirus? And can dogs get it? Today, we try to answer them. Guest: Carl Zimmer, science reporter and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Do your children still have more questions? Here’s a guide on how to talk to them about the coronavirus.With many kids home from school, we have some tips for creating structure around your children’s school days, and some recommendations for podcasts to help keep little ones occupied — and learning.
A Historic Stimulus Bill

A Historic Stimulus Bill

2020-03-2630:4148

To rescue the American economy in the coronavirus crisis, Congress is on the verge of adopting the most expensive stimulus bill in U.S. history. But how much is the battle over this measure being influenced by the last financial crisis? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The bill promises a $1,200 payout to millions of Americans, increased jobless aid and grants to save small businesses from permanent closure. Here’s what it means for you.
Last week, President Trump called himself a “wartime president” as he faced up to the threat caused by the coronavirus. But only days later — and with the crisis escalating — he has abandoned that message. What changed?Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Despite the warnings, President Trump said he believed a crippled economy and forced social isolation would inflict more harm than the spread of the virus.Mr. Trump is now facing a personal dilemma as he responds to the crisis: How can he save his campaign for re-election when so much is suddenly going so wrong?The White House and Congress have reached a $2 trillion stimulus deal, the biggest such package in modern American history. The plan would offer jobless benefits to individuals and direct cash payments to taxpayers.
So far, the United States has been losing the battle against the pandemic, with a patchwork of inconsistent measures across the country proving unequal to halting the spread of the virus. Today, we ask: What will it take to change the course of the crisis?Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump has played down the threat of the virus, while at least 16 states institute stay-at-home orders. Here are the latest updates.The rampant spread of the coronavirus has left a trail of loss across most people’s lives. Here is some advice on how to cope.
Two weeks ago, the biggest story in the country was the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. Now, with the dramatic onset of the coronavirus crisis, the primary has largely gone off the radar. Today, we talk to Alexander Burns, a political reporter at The New York Times, about what happened when those two stories collided. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In a presidential debate without an in-person audience earlier this month, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders clashed over how to handle the coronavirus crisis. With so much news, you may have missed the debate — here are six takeaways to catch you up.Mr. Sanders is now reassessing his campaign as Mr. Biden plans for the nomination, announcing he will pick a woman as his running mate should he be chosen as the candidate.
One magazine writer reflects on life’s unpredictability and shares her story of a hospital error that scrambled two pairs of Colombian identical twins. This is the story of how the four brothers found one another — and of what happened next.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
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Comments (3327)

Gillian Urquhart

to ojh

Apr 9th
Reply

daisy

this is a ridiculous and sort of wonderful non-coronavirus thing to listen to

Apr 9th
Reply

ncooty

Why are so many journalists seemingly incapable of using past tense?

Apr 8th
Reply

CraggyPete

I hope this liberal hoax doesn't affect my disability check, I need that to pay rent, my landlord is a stupid liberal made me take down my trump flags so he'll probably kick me out if I'm late, then I'll sue his ass! lol bring it on libtardz. Can we end this hoax already? I know trump wants us to go to church on Easter the lords day WWJD? HE WOULD OPEN CHURCH! #TRUMP2020 #MAGA

Apr 7th
Reply (4)

CraggyPete

I hope this liberal hoax doesn't affect my disability check, I need that to pay rent, my landlord is a stupid liberal made me take down my trump flags so he'll probably kick me out if I'm late, then I'll sue his ass! lol bring it on libtardz. Can we end this hoax already? I know trump wants us to go to church on Easter the lords day WWJD? HE WOULD OPEN CHURCH! #TRUMP2020 #MAGA

Apr 7th
Reply

CraggyPete

LOL libtardz, sorry no fake votes for you! Vote by mail is a fraud and it's never worked! I don't want to be like Venizuela, I want to vote in person with my fellow trump fans, it's like a mini rally, so much fun, so much winning. This coronavirus hoax only seems to effect democrats lol look at where it's "hitting" such fake news, if it were real Arkansas would be shut down but its not, I'm still going to the gun range! wake 👆 liberals ur being played by the establishment

Apr 7th
Reply

fearlessone

Thank you! ❤

Apr 7th
Reply (2)

Francisco Perez

I agree with Dr. Anthony S. Fauci. since the beginning the situation has been very uncertain

Apr 4th
Reply

Wendy P

To me, it seems Dr. Fauci is tempering his statements. Hopefully, not and not to appease the administration.

Apr 3rd
Reply

Mary Glanville

xx

Apr 3rd
Reply

Gillian Kydd

I listen regularly from the UK. please could you do a mini podcast to explain how people with no insurance are accessing treatment should they think they have coronavirus symptoms?

Apr 3rd
Reply

CraggyPete

Fake ass Fauci is a deep state secret democrat, I can't wait till trump fires his lying ass. GET BACK TO WORK PEOPLE! I can't have my disability check effected by this hoax. Q knows the truth and will save us! WWG1WGA can't wait till they blow these liberal minds and prove that the earth is flat #southernpride #Trump2020 #FlatEarth

Apr 3rd
Reply (3)

Carol Reed

Cite your sources, Curt.

Apr 3rd
Reply (1)

Philly Burbs

If Fauci said what he really thought Trump will fire him. A Penn expert said the way it's going right now 500,000 to a million dead by Christmas.

Apr 3rd
Reply

Curt Coleman

Bull Shit

Apr 3rd
Reply (3)

Kristina Majsec

I am a bit disappointed with the way Michael carried out this interview. Wasting time trying to get Fayci to criticize Trump (not gonna happen, that is his boss) or the futile exercise in what could have been. Instead, he should have discussed further what will it take for us to lice with this virus till the vaccine arrives, how can we achieve a semi-closed society medium term, reorganizing our hospital system, keeping hospitalization rates manageable, while keeping most people employed either from home or in very socially-distanced workplaces, keeping the supply chains for food, goods and medicines running etc. Fauci started this line of conversation, but Michael was to busy trying to get him on thin ice. Also, the travel ban was completely ineffective: we have huge community spread now regardless. What should have been done was allowing flights but putting people in mandatory and enforceable self-isolation for 14 days upon arrival. That was done with first evacures from Wuhan, but not for any American returning later from Europe or anywhere else - just China and just foreigners were banned, which is in line with this nationalist administration but stupid. This has costed us since Americans returning from Spain can carry the virus as well. Many smaller Asian and European countries have done this and are mitigating the spread well (Singapore, Croatia, Poland)

Apr 2nd
Reply (1)

Lauran

Nice episode

Apr 2nd
Reply

Tim

what an amazing conversation. thank you

Apr 2nd
Reply

Joshua Davis

Narration is good, thank you.

Apr 1st
Reply

Jessie Bananas

The narrator for the show needs to learn how to speed up his sentences. He takes a pause in between each word. it's extremely annoying and reminds me of the sloth.

Mar 31st
Reply
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