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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

980 Episodes
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The United States is preparing to hold its first ever socially distant presidential election. But will it actually work?Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: President Trump’s suggestion that the Nov. 3 vote could be delayed — something he cannot do on his own — drew unusually firm Republican resistance and signaled worry about his re-election bid.Georgia’s troubled primary elections in June may be a preview of graver battles coming in the general election.
Facial recognition is becoming an increasingly central component of police departments’ efforts to solve crimes. But can algorithms harbor racial bias?Guest: Annie Brown, a producer for The New York Times, speaks with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter, about her interview with Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, who was arrested after being misidentified as a criminal by an algorithm. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In response to Mr. Williams’s story being published by The New York Times, the Wayne County prosecutor’s office said that he could have the case and his fingerprint data expunged.
In this episode, Leslie Jamison, a writer and teacher, explores the potentially constructive force of female anger — and the shame that can get attached to it.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
The remains of Vanessa Guillen, an Army specialist, were discovered last month about 25 miles from Fort Hood in central Texas. She was the victim, officials said, of a fellow soldier. Now her death has attracted the attention of the nation — veterans, active-duty service members and civilians.Today, we examine what some claim to be a pervasive culture of sexual harassment inside the U.S. military. Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Women from the military say the response to Specialist Guillen’s killing is their #MeToo moment and a prompt to examine racial inequities in the service.
The Big Tech Hearing

The Big Tech Hearing

2020-07-3034:3127

The C.E.O.s of America’s most influential technology companies — Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook — were brought before Congress to answer a question: Are they too powerful?Today, we talk to our colleague who was in the room about what happened. Guest: Cecilia Kang, a technology and regulatory policy reporter for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In the hearing, the chiefs of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook faced withering questions from Democrats about anti-competitive practices and from Republicans about anti-conservative bias.
Confronting China

Confronting China

2020-07-2928:3939

A cooperative relationship with China has been a pillar of U.S. foreign policy for more than half a century. So why does the Trump administration think it’s time for a change? Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Why top aides to President Trump want to leave a lasting legacy of ruptured diplomatic ties between China and the United States.
A fight has erupted among congressional Republicans over how long and how generously the government should help those unemployed during the pandemic. But what is that battle really about? Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Supplemental checks for laid-off workers are set to stop at the end of July. Republicans and Democrats disagree on what to do next.Why the two parties are unlikely to reach a deal before the end of the month.
A New York Times investigation found that surviving the coronavirus in New York had a lot to do with which hospital a person went to. Our investigative reporter Brian M. Rosenthal pulls back the curtain on inequality and the pandemic in the city.Guest: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro Desk of The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: At the peak of New York’s pandemic, patients at some community hospitals were three times more likely to die than were patients at medical centers in the wealthiest parts of the city.The story of a $52 million temporary care facility in New York illustrates the missteps made at every level of government in the race to create more hospital capacity.
When the university told one woman about the sexual-harassment complaints against her wife, they knew they weren’t true. But they had no idea how strange the truth really was.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
This episode contains strong language.Today, we go inside the fraught weeks that led up to the opening game of the 2020 professional baseball season — from the perspective of the commissioner of Major League Baseball. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The New York Times, spoke with Rob Manfred, the commissioner of Major League Baseball. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The schedule is short. The stadiums will be empty. This is what our baseball writer thinks the season might look like this year.
The Showdown in Portland

The Showdown in Portland

2020-07-2330:1449

This episode contains strong language. Federal agents dressed in camouflage and tactical gear have taken to the streets of Portland, Ore., unleashing tear gas, bloodying protesters and pulling some people into unmarked vans. Today, we go behind protest lines to ask why militarized federal authorities are being deployed to an American city. Guests: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, The New York Times’s homeland security correspondent, and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The federal authorities said they would bring order to Portland, after weeks of protests. But local leaders believe the federal presence is making things worse, and a backlash has grown since the deployment began.Protesters have used everyday home items, including pool noodles, to try to fight the militarized force. This is what our reporter saw on the streets of Portland.
Around the world, safely reopening schools remains one of the most daunting challenges to restarting national economies. While approaches have been different, no country has tried to reopen schools with coronavirus infection rates at the level of the United States. Today, we explore the risks and rewards of the plan to reopen American schools this fall. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The pressure to bring American students back to classrooms is intense, but the calculus is tricky with infections out of control in many communities.Local economies might not fully recover until working parents can send children to school. Here’s why the plan to reopen New York City schools is so important.
The Vaccine Trust Problem

The Vaccine Trust Problem

2020-07-2128:5859

Public health officials and private researchers have vowed to develop a coronavirus vaccine in record time. But could that rush backfire? Guest: Jan Hoffman, a health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Billions of dollars are being poured into developing a coronavirus vaccine, but the rapid timetable may be creating even more vaccine-hesitant patients.Three vaccine developers report that early trials showed promising results with minimal side effects, but one researcher cautioned, “There is still a long way to go.”
This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.Representative John Lewis, a stalwart of the civil rights era, died on Friday. We take a look at his life, lessons and legacy. Guest: Brent Staples, a member of the Times editorial board.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: Mr. Lewis, a son of sharecroppers and an apostle of nonviolence who was bloodied at Selma, Ala., and across the Jim Crow South in the historic struggle for racial equality, and who then carried a mantle of moral authority into Congress, died on Friday. He was 80.Bipartisan praise poured in for the civil rights leader, as friends, colleagues and admirers reached for the appropriate superlatives to sum up an extraordinary life.Mr. Lewis risked his life for justice, The Times’s editorial board wrote.
When the Iowa Attorney General's office began investigating an unclaimed lottery ticket worth millions, an incredible string of unlikely winners came to light, and a trail that pointed to an inside job. Today, listen to a story about mortality — about our greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the pandemic to hear what’s happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.Climbing on the roof to look at stars in the middle of summer. Making French toast and popcorn. Kind eyes. These are some of the memories Tilly Breimhorst has of her grandfather, Craig. We spoke with Tilly in May about losing her grandfather to coronavirus. Today, we check back in with her.Guest: Matilda Breimhorst, a 12-year-old who recently lost her grandfather to the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.As state stay-at-home orders expired, small business owners faced a daunting question: Should they risk the survival of their company, or their health? Today, we speak again with one restaurant owner about the decision she made.Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were aired.One of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States was inside the Smithfield pork factory in Sioux Falls, S.D. Today, we revisit our conversation with a worker at the plant, a refugee who survived civil war and malaria only to find her life and livelihood threatened anew — and ask her how she has been doing since. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, and Achut Deng, a Sudanese refugee who works for Smithfield. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Refugees from around the world worked at the Smithfield pork factory. Then they faced mounting illness and the sudden loss of their jobs.
For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.Italy was an early epicenter of the pandemic in Europe. In March, we spoke to a doctor who was triaging patients north of Milan about the road that might lie ahead for the United States. Today, we call him again to hear what it was like to discharge his last coronavirus patient while the American caseload soars. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan and the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Italy was one of the first countries in Europe to institute a nationwide lockdown and, later, to choose a cautious approach to reopening public spaces. Here is a comparison of how successful other countries have been in their subsequent responses to the pandemic.
After protests convulsed Hong Kong for much of the last year, the city’s pro-democracy movement has been chilled by a new law that some say may change the semiautomonous territory forever. Today, we examine why China chose this moment to assert control, and what the new law means for the city’s future. Guest: Austin Ramzy, a reporter in Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The new legislation grants Beijing broad powers to crack down on a variety of political crimes in Hong Kong and schools are being overhauled to teach loyalty to China.Here’s how the city’s residents are navigating its new reality.
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Comments (4123)

Josh Mangum

defund these shitbags

Aug 3rd
Reply

Jonathan Petherbridge

I don't like angry men or angry women, other people don't seem to either. When you are angry you make bad decisions and do stupid things. I'm embarrassed when I loose my temper and you should be to, it doesn't help you or anyone else.

Aug 3rd
Reply

jacob kemper

woke bullshit

Aug 2nd
Reply (2)

AH

The loud music during the reading was annoying & distracting.

Aug 2nd
Reply (1)

Sybil Lee

Sexual harassment and rape for tears. none of the military services do much about. The victim is labelled a slut and a whore while the rapist goes on with his career

Jul 31st
Reply

Clo Redden

rďď

Jul 31st
Reply

Albert H

My issue with the unemployment aid was that it did not take into account the cost of living on each state. $800 per week goes a loooong way in places like Arizona but in states like California and New York it is barely enough. I'm not going to lie, at times I've felt a little jealous of people in my city getting more money on unemployment than I make even with overtime.

Jul 31st
Reply (1)

Paz Ibarra

I'm surprised there's no mention in here about how Amazon absolutely crushed and bought diapers.com by leveraging the reach of their platform.

Jul 30th
Reply

Somnambulist_23

No mention of $1.75 billion toward FBI building refurbish so they don't move away from trump hotel, OR $30 billion pentagon gift that is in GOP senate HEALS act. Reduced help for taxpayers while simultaneously throwing money to trump and military, is also part of the story.

Jul 30th
Reply

Sasha Anne Lyn

Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and all the rest of them sound like hollow tin men. After lying to the American people and giving themselves an outrageously.huge tax cut in 2017 wherin the rich got richer, the economy flat lined and the deficit grew, they hypocrisy is limitless as real, working people neeed a few hundeed dollars more. letsbis never forget that the people need this money yesterday soley because of the inaction of their own party leader and by default, them: the minions. At this point I am shocked the have the nerve to stand up there like tin pot dictators and that the people have not stormed the Bastille over this.

Jul 30th
Reply

Jonathan Petherbridge

Don't make this about trump, it is about genocide and expansionism. Surely left and right can agree on genocide. Did "never again" mean anything to anyone? The CCP is the bad guy here not the US President.

Jul 30th
Reply (2)

CraggyPete

I need this money to survive!! these democrats better not take my money! #Trump2020 #KeepAmericaGreat

Jul 29th
Reply (2)

John Smith

there "is" evidence that the virus originated in a Chinese laboratory. It skipped so many steps in its sequences, to become this dangerous, that it almost certainly was modified and tampered with. ....But the Times knows its dopey audience won't look into that because they propagandize you like the idiots you are

Jul 29th
Reply (17)

ellen cox

I can't tell if @CraggyPete is being sardonic or really believes that pussy-grabbing, science-averse Drumpf gives a crap about anyone except himself... Yes, these are novel times and the notion of pushing vaccines thru so quickly can be nerve-wracking and scary, but also scary and terribly sad are the deaths of approx 150,000 US citizens, many of whom could have been spared if Drumpf's "leadership" consisted of more than navel-gazing and xenophobia...

Jul 29th
Reply

Gina Olsen

What a fascinating, and yet sad story! If there is any example about great creative non-fiction, this is it. Bless you both.

Jul 28th
Reply

Ryan Pena

ya this is less an overview of NYCs mistakes than it is about hospital inequalities. Definitely should change the title for this ep

Jul 27th
Reply

Dale Crabtree

Mistakes New York Made and not one word about nursing homes? Give me a break.

Jul 27th
Reply (3)

The Rabbit Hole

huh the description doesn't seem like it's going to touch on the nursing homes or those 3 million people who just magically grew antibodies.....odd.

Jul 27th
Reply

LindDes

I am so pissed that asshole got away with sabotaging your careers!!!! He really got himself in so deep with his web of lies. He needs some mental help.......although what can you do with a narcissist?

Jul 27th
Reply

Top Clean

Positive thinking will let you do everything better, than negative thinking will. TrumPOTUS Biggest Failure https://youtu.be/hhMAt3BluAU "Stop trumping around, you aren't getting anything done!" You are what you do, not what you say you’ll do. Trump has two parts of brain, 'left' and 'right'. In the left side, there's nothing right. In the right side, there's nothing left. ... On this Spaceship called Earth, we all breathing the same air, all needs clean water and safety. In failure of clean air, wear a MASK and make sure there are no LEAD in the water. In worst case of deathly incompetent leadership, VOTE the person or persons into the airlock. There's is no left or right, only FORWARD. Change of course can take time, but TIME is of the essence, in life or death situations. ... If at first you don’t succeed, Skydiving is not for you ! P.S. Job offer from Ivanka. Wanted : Person willing to seal gas leaks with candle. Must be willing to travel. (^^,) Dreamers by Judy Collins. https://youtu.be/Oyok_k_n1AE

Jul 26th
Reply (3)
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