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In just a few short seasons, Ty Gibbs went from winning in the periphery of the stock car world to becoming one of the most polarizing characters in the NASCAR garage. On this week’s episode of The Dale Jr. Download, Ty joins Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis in the Bojangles Studio to discuss his meteoric rise to becoming a focal point in motorsports. Gibbs stunned onlookers when he won the February 2021 NASCAR Xfinity Series event at the Daytona Road Course, in what was his first attempt in the division. After starting deep in the pack on a late restart, Gibbs put on a driving display that saw him pass several cars and even drive through the grass to take the point, holding off accomplished road racer Austin Cindric in the process. The victory would make history, as it made Gibbs the first driver in the modern NASCAR era to win a national series event in his first attempt.  While Ty has come off as soft-spoken in many of his public interviews, he gives The Download listeners a rare look into his home life, filling Dale and Mike in about his siblings and new townhouse. After Kurt Busch’s recent hard crash at Pocono, Ty received the call to fill in at the last moment, minutes after finishing second in the Saturday afternoon Xfinity event. He explained that to best prepare for the challenge of driving a car he had zero experience in, he retreated home to run laps on his sim racing setup and sleep in his own bed before returning to Pocono early the next morning for the Cup race.  The interview covers Ty’s early years in racing, from competing in shifter karts at venues like the GoPro Motorplex to running late model stock cars on the prestigious CARS tour. He recalls the moment he knew he wanted to pursue a career in racing came after his grandfather Joe, whom he affectionately refers to as “Coach”, took him and his cousin to test a go-kart at Millbridge Speedway. When Mike asked if he has ever struggled with getting acclimated to any type of race vehicle, Ty explained the challenge in transitioning from karts to late models and how it took a couple of years to get comfortable. At one point, he was racing his kart full-time while testing a late model at Hickory Speedway during the week.  Dale and Ty dig into the challenge of dealing with the public perception of coming from an established racing family. Ty gave some insight into how he tunes out the criticism he faces, finding that focusing on his love for motorsports keeps him motivated to move forward. Many young racers are forced to grow up in the public eye, and Gibbs talks about his ongoing maturation in dealing with conflicts both on the track and off. Ty’s future has been a hot topic of discussion as he continues to find success in the Xfinity Series and now filling in at 23XI Racing in Kurt Busch’s absence. He explains he ultimately wants to race in many different types of cars, mirroring the career path of Kyle Larson, whom he looks up to in many regards. They also discuss the future of Joe Gibbs Racing and what roles Ty may see himself in as the years roll on.  This year in the Xfinity Series, one of the main storylines to watch has been JR Motorsports versus Ty Gibbs. And while usually, you’d never invite your competition into your very race shop, Dale Jr. recognizes that Ty is going to be a part of motorsports for many years to come and is choosing to embrace him.   DIRTY AIR Before Ty joins the show, Dale, Mike, Alex and Hannah discuss: New Kyle Petty shirts available on the DirtyMoMedia.com Dale’s play-by-play commentary at Michigan Bubba Wallace’s passionate post-race interview The modified race opener at North Wilkesboro   ASKJR presented by Xfinity This week the fans asked about: The future’s perspective on today’s NASCAR world Racing left-handed Dale’s most prized vintage t-shirt Applying Mike Joy’s commentary advice To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
What do you get when you combine a drug smuggling enterprise straight out of an episode of Miami Vice with the high-dollar sports car racing world of the 1980s? You get the story of Randy Lanier, and on this week’s episode he joins Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis to tell it. At one time a top prospect in American motorsports, Lanier made headlines when he was indicted in 1986 for operating a multi-million dollar drug distribution effort responsible for bringing over 300 tons of marijuana to the United States from Columbia. Just a handful of months before he was Rookie of the Year in the 70th running of the Indianapolis 500. Originally born in rural Lynchburg, Virginia, Lanier and his family of seven moved to Hollywood, Florida when he was 13. The sunny beach lifestyle was captivating for young Randy, and was soon introduced to the thriving marijuana subculture of the 1960s. His father, who worked as a draftsman, was concerned about his seemingly wayward lifestyle and got him a job in construction. But, due to his longhaired appearance, fellow construction workers began asking Randy if he knew where to buy marijuana, and his stint in drug dealing began. Randy shares a frightening story of getting robbed at gun-point during a sale, which temporarily took him away from Florida to Colorado. It was there he met a guru, who invited him to an ashram in Boulder where he learned the art of meditation, which proved to be a big part of his survival in prison as well as a cornerstone of his life today. Upon returning to Florida, Randy continued on his new path until tragically losing his brother Glen in a motorcycle accident. The event was catastrophic for the Lanier family, and Randy explains it spun him out, back into the familiarity of selling marijuana.  While he may not have realized it at the time, Lanier’s eventual career in motorsports was implanted in the back of his mind, thanks in part to listening to the Indianapolis 500 broadcast on the radio when he was a young boy at his family farm in Virginia. Randy recalls a story from the late 1970s when he was attending a car show at the Miami Beach Convention Center and noticed a SCCA-sponsored booth. He picked up a pamphlet and eventually made the call to inquire about becoming a licensed driver. Soon after, he purchased his first race car: a 1957 Porsche 256. After renting out a small warehouse to be his shop and preparing the car for racing action, he entered his first amateur contest at West Palm Beach Speedway in 1980. As legend would have it, he won.  From there he rapidly progressed through the sports car ranks, arriving at the headlining IMSA GT circuit. After spending a few seasons in borrowed rides with minimal results, he decided to take matters into his own hands and form his own racing team. But, to win on a consistent basis required a large bank roll, and so the two roads of Lanier’s life intersected.  At this point, he had some experience with off-shore drug smuggling. At age 19 he used some of his dealing profits to purchase a 27-foot speed boat, initially intended to be a frivolous expenditure for thrill-seeking. He soon began traveling to the Bahamas to bring in loads of marijuana from awaiting motherships. In order to fund his newly formed Blue Thunder Racing team, Lanier expanded from speed boats to fishing boats, then tug boats and finally a full-on barge. The results were instant, and in 1984 he won the IMSA Championship. The next year, he took on CART racing with the intention of heading to Indianapolis. The transition proved difficult, and although he had a successful debut in 1986 in the 500, a devastating crash at Michigan a few weeks later effectively ended his racing career. As it turns out, his drug smuggling efforts caught up with him and soon after he was indicted. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
What do you get when you combine a drug smuggling enterprise straight out of an episode of Miami Vice with the high-dollar sports car racing world of the 1980s? You get the story of Randy Lanier, and on this week’s episode he joins Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis to tell it. At one time a top prospect in American motorsports, Lanier made headlines when he was indicted in 1986 for operating a multi-million dollar drug distribution effort responsible for bringing over 300 tons of marijuana to the United States from Columbia. Just a handful of months before he was Rookie of the Year in the 70th running of the Indianapolis 500. Originally born in rural Lynchburg, Virginia, Lanier and his family of seven moved to Hollywood, Florida when he was 13. The sunny beach lifestyle was captivating for young Randy, and was soon introduced to the thriving marijuana subculture of the 1960s. His father, who worked as a draftsman, was concerned about his seemingly wayward lifestyle and got him a job in construction. But, due to his longhaired appearance, fellow construction workers began asking Randy if he knew where to buy marijuana, and his stint in drug dealing began. Randy shares a frightening story of getting robbed at gun-point during a sale, which temporarily took him away from Florida to Colorado. It was there he met a guru, who invited him to an ashram in Boulder where he learned the art of meditation, which proved to be a big part of his survival in prison as well as a cornerstone of his life today. Upon returning to Florida, Randy continued on his new path until tragically losing his brother Glen in a motorcycle accident. The event was catastrophic for the Lanier family, and Randy explains it spun him out, back into the familiarity of selling marijuana.  While he may not have realized it at the time, Lanier’s eventual career in motorsports was implanted in the back of his mind, thanks in part to listening to the Indianapolis 500 broadcast on the radio when he was a young boy at his family farm in Virginia. Randy recalls a story from the late 1970s when he was attending a car show at the Miami Beach Convention Center and noticed a SCCA-sponsored booth. He picked up a pamphlet and eventually made the call to inquire about becoming a licensed driver. Soon after, he purchased his first race car: a 1957 Porsche 256. After renting out a small warehouse to be his shop and preparing the car for racing action, he entered his first amateur contest at West Palm Beach Speedway in 1980. As legend would have it, he won.  From there he rapidly progressed through the sports car ranks, arriving at the headlining IMSA GT circuit. After spending a few seasons in borrowed rides with minimal results, he decided to take matters into his own hands and form his own racing team. But, to win on a consistent basis required a large bank roll, and so the two roads of Lanier’s life intersected.  DIRTY AIR Before Randy joins the show, Dale, Mike and Matthew discuss: Listeners respond to Dale and Mike’s heated discussion The chaotic Cup race at the Indianapolis Road Course  Indianapolis Oval or Road Course? Dale Jr.’s return to North Wilkesboro   ASKJR presented by Xfinity The fan questions came rolling in about: Doing commentary for other sports Should NASCAR return to Iowa Speedway? The 1995 Impala from MTV Cribs Dale’s perfect tailgate menu To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
If you’ve listened to or watched a NASCAR race in the past 50 years, there’s a voice that is synonymous with some of the sport’s biggest moments. Legendary broadcaster Mike Joy joins Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis to fill listeners in on his career, as well as talk shop about the broadcasting craft. After a meteoric rise from the PA booth of New England’s finest short tracks, Joy has gone on to work for almost every major broadcasting network in motorsports over the past five decades.  Growing up in Windsor, Connecticut, Joy enrolled at the University of Hartford pursuing a degree in engineering. It was here that he got his first on-air experience after taking a position at the university’s radio station as a play-by-play commentator for sporting events. It was also during these years that he became involved in the world of motorsports. He had developed a love for sports cars as a teenager, thanks to an extensive collection of auto magazines and his father’s acquisition of a two-seater that the two worked on. His admiration for the road racing experts of the day, such as Dan Gurney and Mark Donohue sparked an interest to join the driving ranks himself. But without proper funding or opportunity, he settled into the sport of autocross where competitors could use their street vehicles.  His autocross club brought him to Riverside Park Speedway in Agawam, Massachusetts – a small pavement oval located in an amusement park. Thanks to his broadcasting experience, he was asked to hop on the microphone during an autocross meet one Sunday to help inform any park attendees who may have wandered into the track exactly what was happening in the competition. Before long, park owner Ed Carroll noticed that a few hundred people had gathered in the grandstands to watch a single car weaving around barrels, and invited Joy on board to become a fill-in PA announcer. Although he initially turned down the offer, citing a disinterest in the crude jalopies of the oval racing circuit, he attended a Saturday night show at the recommendation of the track’s public relations specialist. After witnessing a mad dash to the finish between two drivers and the effect it had on the audience, Joy thought “I need to be a part of this.” Joy fills Dale and Mike in on how taking the position at Riverside introduced him to the legendary Ken Squier, and how that guided him to joining the Motor Racing Network. He talks about an opportunity he received to call some of the 1975 IROC race at Daytona, and how that moment made him realize that he could have a career in broadcasting.  The conversation also dives into the art of commentating, and how different platforms require different approaches. Joy recounts a hilarious story of sneaking into the 1976 Daytona 500 and joining in on the Wood Brothers’ victory lane celebration. He also shares the details of his final conversation with Dale Earnhardt Sr. Although known for his contributions to the sport from inside the broadcaster’s booth, Joy still managed to have a career in road racing, and shares the details of his 1973 IMSA debut, as well as his experiences in the 1993 24 Hours of Daytona. In 2022, Joy celebrated his 22nd consecutive year as lead commentator for the Daytona 500. It also marked his 46th year of involvement with Daytona Speedweeks, a record that may never be eclipsed.  DIRTY AIR presented by Filtertime Before Mike Joy joins the show, Dale, Mike and Matthew get real about: NASCAR’s wild weekend at Pocono Denny Hamlin’s pass for the lead considered retaliation against Ross Chastain? Ty Gibbs subbing in for Kurt Busch The future of Kyle Busch   ASKJR presented by Xfinity Alex Timms brings fan questions to Dale about: The advantage the NextGen rear view camera provides The upcoming modified opening races at North Wilkesboro Hanging with Noah Gragson in victory lane Collecting diecast cars To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
The success of sports is often built on rivalries. Auto Racing is no different. Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis bring their favorite rivalries from the table of truth to this special episode. In the late 90's the NASCAR Xfinity Series was a hotbed for talent but also a series full of hot tempers. One of the great rivalries of the era was between an out-spoken northern driver, Champion Randy Lajoie, and an aggressive Georgian named Buckshot Jones. Dale Earnhardt had several rivals throughout his storied career. Most foe were created by physical contact between two racecars. Dale's rivalry with Ricky Rudd was personal. Rudd reveals how their shattered friendship lead to some legendary on-track altercations. Ron Hornaday Jr. is still not over it. In a 2011 NASCAR Truck Series race at Texas Motor Speedway, he and Kyle Busch made contact on the track. Busch proceeded to wreck Hornaday under caution. NASCAR may have parked and suspended Busch for the actions, but it was Hornaday who suffered the most. The incident cost him a shot at the Championship. It's a wound that isn't fully healed to this day. Some rivals start as best friends. Some, under the same roof. Jeff Burton and Ward Burton open up about how their different personalities and upbringing, created bad blood between one of Virginia's most beloved NASCAR families. Rusty Wallace and Dale Earnhardt were great friends behind closed doors. On the race track? Far from it. The two giants of the NASCAR world battled each other relentlessly, resulting in a library of contentious moments and altercations. Rusty opens up about it and we find out how it played into a rivalry with a young Jeff Gordon. Dale Jr. says that if there is a Mount Rushmore of Motorsports rivalries, the Geoff Bodine / Dale Earnahrdt rivalry would be on it. Bodine details his side of one of the sport’s most talked about feuds. Last but not least, a colorful Jimmy Spencer gets down and dirty about his distain for Kurt Busch. How did "Mr. Excitement" get so mad that he punched Kurt Busch? ASKJr presented by Xfinity Before the rivalry talk Hannah Newhouse brought fan questions to Dale Jr. about: What track should host the Championship finale? What dream racecars would Dale Jr. like to test at North Wilkesboro? The mysterious red left front tire at Daytona in 2004. Lugs Harvey or Harry Hogg? To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Tony Eury Jr. is more than a cousin to Dale Earnhardt Jr. He's a brother. Dale Jr.'s former crew chief comes to the table of truth to discuss their best days together in racing and the hard truths of the controversial breakups that made the headlines during their careers. From their two years of winning the championship in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, Dale Earnhardt and the Eury's took their success to the NASCAR Cup Series. Tony, Dale Jr. and co-host Mike Davis talk about the challenge of growing together as a team and a family. Dale Jr. wastes no time asking Tony about "creativity" he used on their racecars and how other's in the sport were talking about how fast they were. Tony and Dale laugh about re-gaining their mojo by drinking more. And yes, it worked. They also tell the hilarious story of a test session that ended in Dale Jr. doing donuts in the garage area. Eury details how the 2001 death of Dale Earnhardt impacted he, Dale Jr and the entire Bud No. 8 team in their approach and future trajectory. As many triumphs that the team earned, there was also tension and arguments. Like there typically is with family, the cousins didn't always see eye to eye. The tension led to a severing in the relationship and the first split between Dale Jr and the Eury's in 2004. Tony Jr. and Dale open up to each other about their feelings at the time and the regret they have to this day about the situation. The cousins discuss the Charlotte 600 impromptu presser by "Pops" Eury and how that lit a fuse in the media. Tony Jr. shares a never-before-told story about how Teresa handled the situation in the shop that week. They also open up about Dale's departure from Dale Earnhardt Inc. and how thinks could've been much different. The Hendrick years offered so much promise to Dale Earnhardt Jr. But just like at DEI, there were wins and painful losses. Eury talks about Dale Jr.'s mindset and lack of confidence through the trying times as the two detail the second split in their crew chief-driver relationship. He also brings us inside the Hendrick Motorsports dynamic to share the challenges and struggles within the organization during this period. The table discussion brings the relationship from Hendrick Motorsports through the Eury's next stint with the Earnhardts and Jr Motorsports. Tony Eury shares his thoughts on being Danica Patrick's crew chief and how there were similarities between she and Dale Jr.   DIRTY AIR presented by FilterTime Before Tony Eury Jr. came to the table, Dale and Mike discuss: Dale Jr's high-pitched excitement in the broadcast booth at Atlanta The 2022 Ross Chastain Aggression Tour Corey Lajoie's near-win at Atlanta.   ASKJR presented by Xfnity Hannah Newhouse brings fan questions to the podcast for Dale about: Ryan Ellis' tweet about stealing sponsors from another driver. Favorite Atlanta Braves players. What was miserable about being a driver and the worst part of being a broadcaster? Would the Xfinity Series benefit from an identity shift to V6 Motors or electric? To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
He's the man responsible for starting a NASCAR team that has turned everyone's heads in NASCAR. Today, racer and entrepreneur Justin Marks sits with Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Mike Davis to discuss the wild journey from a no-name to someone shaking up the industry. Marks' exposure to the sport of auto racing came at an early age, when his grandfather, a fan of motorsports, took him to local dirt tracks in Missouri. From there, his passion grew. Eventually the Marks family moved to California, as his father Michael chased dreams in Silicon Valley. For young Justin, his dreams came in the form of an amateur ride in the SCCA road racing ranks. From amateur to pro, his career started to climb as he found himself having success in IMSA and events like the 24-hours of Daytona. But how did this road racer transition to the NASCAR world? Influences like Boris Said, a cross-over racer, took Marks to North Carolina. It also took him to a basement party at Dale Jr.'s house. Dale Jr. didn't even realize that the future NASCAR team owner was there. From there, his family's success created opportunities in the NASCAR ranks from the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, through Xfinity and even the elite Cup Series. Marks admits that he didn't always do things right and revealed what it was like being fired from a ride that he paid for. He did find success in the NASCAR ranks, winning an Xfinity Series race on the windy and wet turns of the Mid-Ohio racing course in 2016 for Chip Ganassi Racing. Ironically, the same team he'd end up purchasing in his breakthrough in the Motorsports business world. Realizing his journey behind the wheel served a selfish need, Marks realized he had a "higher calling." He realized that he wanted to be a mover in the Motorsports industry. He did so by starting a team called "Trackhouse Racing." Trackhouse purchased two charters and longtime NASCAR team Chip Ganassi Racing. A purchase that happened one year before this appearance on The Dale Jr. Download. He admits that the decision was done in a risky order but he knew he needed to make some unorthodox moves to make his dream happen. In a year, a new team has created two first-time winners in the NASCAR Cup Series and has both of its teams in a playoff spot, running up-front each week and stealing headlines? How? Dale Jr admits that he was among the plethora of doubters, that didn't see the rapid success of the first year team coming. The mantra of Marks' approach is rooted in "belief." A philosophy in creating a business and culture that differs from the norm and placing belief in his drivers and employees to produce results. Marks discusses the rise of NASCAR superstar Ross Chastain and how he has ruffled the feathers of some of the sport's biggest names. He opens up about discussions with Ross and with other car owners like Rick Hendrick. He also talks about conversations with Denny Hamlin after a run in with Chastain in St. Louis. Dale Jr. and Mike Davis get the young team owner to open up about his thoughts on the state of the sport and how he sees the business model moving forward with the cost of the Next Gen car and the up-coming television deal that NASCAR will have to make in 2025. How does he view the current Charter system and the potential of new team owners, potentially ones sitting at the table, entering the Charter system? DIRTY AIR presented by FilterTime Before bringing Justin Marks to the table the DJD Gang discuss: The Download live at Ole Red in Nashville. Lightning delays and race start times. The reality that everything is going to streaming. ASK JR presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse tees up fan questions about: Dale's rain delays as a driver. Who closed down the bar in Nashville? Fiery Tony Stewart getting physical with Ernie Francis in the SRX race Dale Jr. racing a Late Model at North Wilkesboro To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
A special live taping of The Dale Jr. Download with host Dale Earnhardt Jr and Mike Davis at Ole Red in Nashville, Tennessee brought to you by Ally. The beers and the stories flowed on stage in front of a packed house at Blake Shelton's bar and music venue. NASCAR Hall of Famer Darrell Waltrip joins Davis and Earnhardt to share tall tales and loads of laughs. Before DW showed up, Dale and Mike share some fun stories about their relationship, including the time a drunk Dale Jr. offered to be a perfect stranger's best man at a wedding. Oh, and the best man turned out to be a con-man. Dale talks about being back in the booth for this weekend's Ally 400 at Nashville Superspeedway. Dale Jr. also discusses recent test at North Wilkesboro Speedway in preparation for his return to racing a Late Model Stock car. Yes, that's an announcement! Dale Jr will be racing at North Wilkesboro on August 31st. How about that bombshell? Dale talks about his buddy Martin Truex Jr.'s decision to run one more season. He also talks about JR Motorsports' desire to compete in the NASCAR Cup Series. Ally brought Darrell Waltrip to the stage and boy he didn't disappoint. Ole DW stole the show at Ole Red. Waltrip made a name for himself down the road at the Nashville Fairgrounds. Waltrip talks about being called "Jaws" and the how it balanced with "The Cale Scale." This wasn't your ordinary talk with DW. Dale Jr found out the answer to something he's always wondered about. What happened when the cameras cut-away from Darrell and Dale Earnhardt after their infamous wreck at Richmond in 1986? DW reveals the Richmond revenge that was exacted in a never-before told story. Dale also seeks the truth about the controversial ending to the 1985 Winston when Darrell's Junior Johnson #11 blew an engine coming across the start-finish line. The guys decided to do an impromptu version of AskJr. It was live, in a bar full of beverages and it was hosted by former NFL player Bernard Pollard, The questions and answers are epic as Dale and Mike let it fly. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Phil Parsons has done it all. From being the little brother of a NASCAR Legend, a racer, a team owner and a broadcaster, the only thing he hadn't done was come to the Bojangles Studio to sit down with Dale Earnhardt Jr. Until now. On his 65th birthday, Parsons sits down with Dale Jr. and Mike Davis about his fascinating life. All he wanted to do is race. Plain and simple. From the age of five, watching his brother Benny in daring Figure-8 races through his older brother's monumental ascension through the sport, little brother just wanted to drive. When he got his shot, it didn't come easy. He took a Vega and some infrequent opportunities and made the most of them by winning races in NASCAR's Baby Grand Series, which was to become the Dash Series. He won at places like Hickory Motor Speedway, Caraway Speedway, North Wilkesboro and Nashville. It's a period of Parsons’ story not often talked about and a time that Dale Jr. came to the table with curiosity about. Parsons’ racing career hit rock bottom, when family money and opportunity ran dry. So, he humbly went to Humpy Wheeler for help. The advice led him to a "real job" working with Travis Carter on Hal Needham and Burt Reynold's Skoal Bandit team. The team's drivers were stuntman Stan Barrett and the legendary Harry Gant. The job created a relationship with U.S. Tobacco which blossomed into funding for his own chances back behind the wheel. The sponsorship sent Parsons on a course for Cup. At first, he was just trying to stick in NASCAR's Late Model Sportsman ranks (now known as the Xfinity Series). His rookie season produced success and an opportunity the next year with the Skoal Bandit team in NASCAR's Cup Series. Parsons is well known for a massive crash he experienced at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama which sent his racecar tumbling violently on the high-banks. He details the wreck from his vantage point and the pain it produced. Phil also experienced the jubilation of winning in NASCAR's elite series, when he captured a win, five years after his flip, at Talladega. He explains the Zen of having the perfect car that day and matching it with perfect strategy and drive. At the end of the 1989 season Phil elected to have cataract surgery. After the successful procedure, Parsons started in his next big opportunity, for the powerful Morgan McClure Racing team. But, only three races into his tenure with the team, he got a call saying that the team was going in a different direction. Phil opens up about taking that phone call and the decision that ultimately cut the growth of his Cup career. Parson's also reveals how false rumors about his eyesight then hindered potential chances in Cup. His decision to return the Xfinity Series was a family matter. He details the choice and how he built part-two of his racing career. Parsons goes into detail about his brother Benny and the wild repair job that netted him the 1973 NASCAR Cup Series Championship. He also talks about Benny's role as a television broadcaster and how his legacy lives on. Phil too followed in Benny's footsteps with a successful television career of his own, to which he still enjoys to this day. DIRTY AIR Before Parsons joins the show, Dale, Mike, Hannah and Matthew talk about: Dale and Amy's wild commercial travel adventures and their trip to France. The upcoming live DJD show at Nashville's Ole Red. Jeremy Mayfield and others winning after being on the show. The sport needing more short-track style road courses.   ASKJR presented by Xfinity The fan questions came rolling in about: What songs pump up Dale Jr. Road Course suggestions like running a green Sonoma or The Boot at the Glen! Dale Jr driving a V8 Supercar. Dale Jr. asked to Le Mans for Garage 56? and more To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
They say, it ain't cheatin' unless you're caught. Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis share some of the best cheating stories to ever be heard on the download, with some surprises thrown in. Has the statute of limitations passed? And is it really cheating? We like to call it creativity and innovation. From Todd Parrott illegally cutting NASCAR templates while officials are being distracted, to Darrell Waltrip using Nitrous to boost his racecar, these are tales that are of legend. On this episode we also hear from racing great, convicted felon and creative genius Gary Balough. He reveals some tales from his days cheating up racecars on the short tracks of America. Ward Burton even brings a Daytona cheat to the floor. One of Dale Earnhardt's early car owners tried to skirt around a Dale Earnhardt cheating story. Dale Jr. and Mike hold him to the fire and get one of the wildest admissions of cheating the table has ever heard. No cheating show would be complete without some stories from former crew chief, car owner and racer Andy Petree. Oh, and just when you think the show is over and all the tall-tales are done, we bring a new surprise into the studio and an unexpected guest. Dean Jones worked with Petree, at Leo Jackson's team, in a secret room making some intriguing things for their racecars. Jones brought something to the table that stole the show. DIRTY AIR Before getting to the dirt from our guests, the Dale Jr. Download gang comes to the table with their own admissions. What have they cheated on? Fess up! ASK JR presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse hits Dale Jr. with fan-submitted inquiries about: Who's the more trusted babysitter, Mike Davis or Matthew Dillner? Favorite and least favorite broadcast booths Goodwood dream ride? Some bucket-list tracks for Dale Jr to hit. Oswego Speedway and Supermodified glory To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Bonus content for fans of The Dale Jr. Download: Dirty Mo Media's newest podcast, Speed Street, is hosted by IndyCar driver Conor Daly and comedian and social media influencer Joey Mulinaro. Enjoy their most recent episode and then follow and subscribe to Speed Street on major podcasting platforms. Find it on Twitter and Instagram at @SpeedStreetPod. New episodes post weekly. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
In part one with Jeremy Mayfield we dove head-first into the former driver's failed drug tests, lengthy court battles, indefinite suspension from NASCAR and the tangled web of alleged conspiracy that shrouds his story. Today, Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Mike Davis speak with Mayfield about the mighty rise before his world came tumbling down. The Kentucky native started as a fabricator before working his way onto the Nashville Fairgrounds Late Model racing scene. Through hard work came opportunity. On the short track scene, Mayfield won races, even ones he wasn't supposed to be entered in. Yes, there's a story there! His short track success led to a rise into the upper-ranks of NASCAR. But at first, Mayfield didn't have the speed. So he had to get "creative" to gain and advantage. But first, he needed to get some soaked tires by NASCAR's technical inspection process. Mayfield reveals the "wink" that paved the way to furthering his young career. Mayfield opens up about negotiations with Cale Yarborough when he signed his first major deal with a NASCAR team. His timeline, though jagged, rose upward to the Kranefuss-Hass team and then to driving for the great Roger Penske. During this time, he was clearly making it know that he was a force to reckon with. An in-team rivalry with Rusty Wallace got to near ridiculous levels. The day he planted his flag in the ground was at Pocono in 2000 when he moved Dale Earnhardt, on the final corner, to win. Jeremy details the controversial tangle and what the Intimidator's reaction was the next time they saw each other. The biggest break for Mayfield came with Dodge and Ray Evernham's No. 19 team. Mayfield won races and raced his way into NASCAR's playoffs in the high-profile ride. But it wasn't without drama either. Internal struggles with Ray Evernham went public. Then, Mayfield made a final mistake. Dale Jr. gets to the bottom of what led to Mayfield's departure, and eventually led to the downfall of his racing career.   DIRTY AIR Before getting to part-two of the Mayfield story, Dale Jr. & Mike Davis get animated discussing: A wild St. Louis Cup Series race full of its own drama Ross Chastain's post-race "trolling"? Will Denny Hamlin and Chase Elliott exact revenge? Conor Daly and Joey Mullinaro bring it in Speed Street debut.   ASKJR Presented by Xfinity Fan questions delivered to Dale with X-fi speed by Hannah Newhouse about: NASCAR Crown Jewels. Let's pick it and be done! The Future of the Xfinity Series. Electric? Safety response teams. Where can it improve? To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Jeremy Mayfield is still indefinitely suspended from NASCAR. Today he sits down with Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Mike Davis to share his story about the drug test that changed his NASCAR career, and life. The year was 2009, and Mayfield was a race-winner in NASCAR. May 1, 2009 he was called to perform a random drug test at Richmond Raceway. The test, and the result eight days later, would become one of the sport's biggest controversies of the era, and play out publicly and in the U.S. Court system. To this day, Mayfield denies any drug use. He contends that the positive test was a result of a combination of prescribed Adderall and over-the-counter Claritin-D. He was the first driver to trip a positive test under NASCAR's new substance abuse policy. Mayfield refused to play-ball and decided to fight America's largest motorsports sanctioning bodies. He not only contested the result, but questioned the head of NASCAR's drug lab, Aegis' Dr. David Black. The battle between NASCAR and Mayfield was all over the news and played out for years in the courts. Trouble seemed to follow Mayfield after the test and suspension. There was a July drug test in 2009 that resulted in a lengthy delay between the time of the call to test and Mayfield reporting. The Kentucky native opens up about what his lawyers were telling him to do and why the delay happened. That test, by NASCAR's lab, showed positive for high levels of methamphetamines. Mayfield says his independent tests, taken just hours later, showed no trace of the drug. In 2011, Mayfield's personal shop and house were the subject of a warrant and a raid by law enforcement. He details what happened from his vantage point when the SWAT teams arrived with machine guns and broke down the doors of his home. The raid resulted in a string of felony charges for stolen items and a charge for possession of meth. Mayfield denies the meth that was found and tells his take on the baggie they discovered in his safe. Mayfield still believes that all of the drug tests that tested positive were false or were a part of a greater conspiracy. He claims that a personal feud with NASCAR's Brian France was the root of much of his troubles. Now, this might not be "the' story, but it is "his" story. The Download gives the former racer a chance to share his account of the fascinating story.. DIRTY AIR Before Jeremy came to the table, the DJD crew talks about: The World 600 and why it shouldn't be named anything else. Chase Briscoe's Hail Mary full of crash. The new Dirty Mo Media podcast, Speed Street, with Indycar driver Conor Daly and Joey Mulinaro. ASKJR Presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse brings it with fan questions from Twitter and the live YouTube chat. The Snake Pit at the Indy 500. Dale's anxiety of having two aggressive JR Motorsports driver gunning for a win. The Roval wouldn't be here if the racing was as good as the 600 a few years ago. Dale going to a World of Outlaws race? To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
He's a NASCAR winner. He co-owns a race team with Michael Jordan. He's not afraid to tell it like it is. Denny Hamlin joins Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Mike Davis at the table for a bold and honest conversation about the sport. Hamlin comes in "full send" mode with his takes on the sport and the direction it is headed. His unique perspective, as a current competitor and car owner, gives him an even bigger voice at the table. Boy, does he use it! While he is candid about what he feels isn't right, he points out that his intentions are to make the sport better. Sometimes Denny's presence and opinions on social platforms and in the media have created controversy, but his voice has become one of a leader in the garage. Hamlin opens up about the conversations he's had with NASCAR CEO Jim France about the potential expansion of his team, 23XI Racing, and how they are on hold until further notice. Denny talks about what he needs to see before he and MJ take the two-car operation to the next level. Hamlin lets us in to how he feels about the business model of NASCAR between drivers, tv partners, teams and tracks. He says that the pie is big enough, but it needs to be divided differently. The veteran NASCAR driver pulls no punches in expressing what he believes needs to happen. Hamlin and Earnhardt discuss the state of the charter system in the sport and the pros and cons of starting a team in the Cup Series. If the sport expands to a higher number of charters, how much should a new team pay? Fresh off his second-place run at the NASCAR All-Star Race, Hamlin shares his disappointment in the controversial yellow flag and Ryan Blaney's window net issue. Plus, did his post race comments and use of the "F" word get him in hot water? Denny also explains what he thinks about the All Star Race as a whole and how the event, and other aspects of the sport, have become diluted. Dale Jr. asks Denny, who currently races the FedEx #11 for Joe Gibbs Racing in the NASCAR Cup Series, if he would drive for his own team someday. Earnhardt also gets Hamlin’s insight into the current dynamic at JGR with four full-time drivers, contract questions, and the emerging talent of Ty Gibbs waiting in the wings. What's gonna give? Denny also talks about his exit plan from behind the wheel of a racecar and what that will look like.. After struggling for a good chunk of 2022, Hamlin has reached victory lane. The season though, has only resulted in two top-five finishes. Denny gives his take on the Next Gen car's performance and which issues need to be addressed. He talks about Bubba Wallace's performance and 23XI Racing’s big win in Kansas with veteran driver Kurt Busch. DIRTY AIR Before Denny came to the table, Dale Jr., co-host Mike Davis, Hannah Newhouse and producer Matthew Dillner share some conversation about: The All Star Race and the controversial caution. The Window-net debacle and what should have been done. NASCAR owning one mistake but not the other. What should happen to the All Star Race in the future? Jimmie Johnson's run to the Indianapolis 500 has come with some big risks ASKJR presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse brings fan questions to the table about: Dale Jr.'s wildest appearances, including driving a tank and landing on an aircraft carrier. How Blaney handled the anxiety of the end of the All Star Race. Dale's childhood love for wrestling and how it was stifled in the Earnhardt homestead. Late Night drunken Waffle House orders To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Yates, a name synonymous with power. Master engine builder Doug Yates, son of NASCAR Hall of Famer Robert Yates, comes to "the table of truth" to share stories with Dale Earnhardt Jr., and co-host Mike Davis, about a family legacy filled with ups, downs and everything between. Growing up in North Carolina, the epicenter of modern stock car racing, Doug knew nothing different than his father Robert working on engines. But life in Charlotte shifted to the hills of North Wilkesboro. The Yates family uprooted, and went to work for NASCAR car-owner and folk hero Junior Johnson. Living on a farm, just steps away from a modest laboratory of speed, Robert Yates crafted horsepower into the wee hours of the night with his young son right beside him. Doug details the formidable years they spent in Wilkes County and how it prepared them for their racing timeline. When DiGard Racing came calling, Robert packed up and left the farm. The departure caused tension between Robert and Junior for years. It wouldn't be the only tension. Darrell Waltrip's departure from DiGard resulted in unspoken animosity that spanned decades. It wasn't until Robert's final months, before cancer took his life, that son Doug found a way to get them together to bury the hatchet. Doug gives us a unique perspective on DiGard’s successes, like the ‘83 title run w/ Bobby Allison and the Daytona 500 win that some called “bumper-gate.” He also details dynamics that led to the fall of DiGard and his father leaving the sport. In 1985, just two years after his engine won, Yates watched the Great American Race from his television. But soon the sport that came calling for Yates again. Rick Hendrick was using his engines when Ford set up the next opportunity. Doug carefully details the alignment with Ranier-Lundy racing that led eventually led to the creation of Robert Yates Racing. While young phenom Rusty Wallace was in line to be their driver, Yates took a swing in a different direction, choosing a racer with a familiar pedigree, Davey Allison. With Allison's raw talent and the straightaway speed of Yates Engines, it created speed that even the Intimidator wasn't pleased with. Doug admits the Yates engines were cranking out about 50-horsepower more than the other Ford engines. This forced NASCAR to get involved. The following years of the Yates story read like a novel. Wins and a near title w/ Davey were followed by his untimely death in a helicopter crash in 1993. Yates opens up about his family's struggle with moving on from a driver that was like a son and a brother. Then, their next big star, Ernie Irvan’s practice crash at Michigan International Speedway. Ernie returned from severe head injuries, to win w/ RYR, but the accident proved to stunt the growth of a once promising career. Most don’t know that the next step for RYR nearly put Dale Earnhardt as the driver of the Texaco No. 28 Ford. What? But, it was Robert Yates who said he wanted another Dale. Once again, Yates went a different direction and his choice was Dale Jarrett. The combo proved lethal, netting the team two Daytona 500's and the 1998 NASCAR Cup Series Championship. Doug opens up about the unusual partnership that brought bitter rivals and the two giants of Ford Racing Engines to form an unlikely alliance. Just how did Jack Roush and Robert Yates agree to partner? Doug holds the key. The company still thrives today but not just in racing, manufacturing for medical companies, defense projects and more. OPEN SEGMENT Dale Jr. announces his new children’s book “Buster’s Trip to Victory Lane” “The” new and dirty name for Open Segment Mike’s commencement speech Kurt Busch's win! ASKJR presented by Xfinity Hannah brings fan questions to the table about: Drivers pulling those belts tight Dale Jr.’s Black-top desires How Dale Earnhardt would handle the SIM To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
When a Motorsports icon walks into the room, that room changes. Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis welcome four-time Indianapolis 500 winner Rick Mears to the table for a fascinating discussion about his storied racing career. From the streets of Bakersfield came a young man, with a motorcycle and a thirst for competition. The sensible influence of a mother, added two more wheels underneath Rick Mears. Little did she know that it would lead to being one of the fastest racers on the planet. First, young Rick honed his skills on the dirt of Ascot Park, jumping and sliding around in Sprint Buggies. The world of off-road racing took young him to the desert, where races like the Mint 400 and the Baja 1000 introduced Mears to some of the giants of Motorsport. As his reputation grew, so did opportunity. Bill Simpson plucked Mears from the dirt into open-wheeled racecars. Two years later, this quiet Californian was attempting to qualify for the Indianapolis 500. His first 500 attempt came with failure. The experience of not making the 33-car field came with learning opportunities and a random meeting that would change the course of Mears' life. Enter Roger Penske. The famed racing team owner tabbed the virtually unknown racer to pilot one of his open-wheeled beasts. The duo blossomed into what became one of the most successful driver-car owner combinations in the sports' history. Mears' style was calm and calculated. Rick admits that his demeaner led to an embarrassing and potentially dangerous moment in the opening laps of his first Indy 500. It was so bad, that he didn't even want to cue the radio to tell Roger Penske. It's a story you have to hear to believe. Rick says that "being strapped to a bomb," inside of an Indycar, will teach a racecar driver to go to the limit of speed and not go over. How did a young Mears deal with the ever-present factory of fear and develop the uncanny ability to walk a car to the edge of disaster so successfully? While his early career was pretty clean, disaster did strike Mears eventually. He admits to Dale Jr. and Mike that the horrific crash at San Air in Canada that left his feet shattered, was caused by driver error. Mears survived the crash but endured through most of his career feeling the pain caused by the incident. Mears became a four-time Indy 500 Champion, a feat only accomplished by three other drivers in the 104th running of the world's most famous race. But during some of those wins, Mears viewed Indy as just another race. It wasn't until later in his racing life, that he learned to appreciate what Indianapolis truly meant. Out of a curiosity created by filming the tv show "Lost Speedways" Mike Davis inquires about Rick Mears' take on the USAC / CART split in 1979. This question leads to Mears revealing that he had once tested a Formula-1 car and even had a signed contract with Bernie Ecclestone. Why did Mears stay the course in American open-wheel racing rather than a move overseas to the world of F1? Mears opens up about his disastrous 1992 Indy crash and the change in his mindset that led to hanging up the helmet. While many wanted him to go for an unprecedented 5th Indy 500 win, Mears knew it was his time to walk away. OPEN SEGMENT Before Mears entered the Bojangles Studio, the DJD gang took a fresh new swing at the "Open Segment" of the show to talk about: Kyle Busch leaving his racecar on pit road and walking away to the garage at Darlington. Joey Logano's controversial last lap contact with William Byron for the win. Is Joey doing it right? How should Byron handle it moving forward? Dale Jr. and Rutledge Wood's role in the Kentucky Derby broadcast and the awkwardness of interviewing Jack Harlow and Drake. What should the "Open Segment" of the show be called anyway? ASKJR presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse serves up fan questions about: Miami's F1 Weekend Strange Things Dale has autographed. North Wilkesboro Speedway News Dale's Rich Strike moment and more! To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
"The GOAT" Ricky Carmichael sits down with Dale Earnhardt Jr. and co-host Mike Davis for a fascinating discussion about his decorated career as the greatest motocross and supercross, rider of all-time, his brief go at NASCAR and much more. Dale Jr. admits that when Carmichael enters a room, the room changes. Ricky brings much more than an impressive resume to the Bojangles Studio. He brings honesty and openness about the ups and downs of his career. From dirt to riches, he details his humble beginnings in Florida and how a 5-year-old went from riding a three-wheel bike to becoming a 2-wheel racing icon. Carmichael admits, he didn't race for himself, but his parents. They were the motivation he used to succeed in his early riding days. He reveals that for years, he actually hated dirt bikes. Racing MX / SX takes more than just God-given talent, it takes bravery. Dale Jr. and Mike get Ricky to talk about the mindset that it takes to make it in such a wild sport. At first came failure, than a dedication to his craft that led him to finally beat the great Jeremy McGrath in 2001. Then, in 2002 and 2004, Carmichael did the unthinkable. He was perfect. 24 wins in 24 races, for two seasons, solidified his status as a legend of the game. But in between the success' was heartache, tough business decisions and injuries, that threatened it all. Hear how Carmichael raced through a torn ACL to try to progress his racing career. RC talks about his current life as a broadcaster and how the passionate and vocal Supercross fanbase makes his job even more of a challenge. He opens up about the business side from the various perspectives he's had as a rider, a broadcaster and a team owner in the MX/SX ranks. Do present-day riders get paid what they should? "Someone's making money," says Carmichael. Ricky's retirement form motorcycle racing in 2007 sent shockwaves across the sport. But it wasn't the end of his racing career, he just added two wheels! A conversation with Kasey Kahne and a test session in a Ray Evernham Late Model at Hickory Speedway in North Carolina, led to the start of his Stock Car Racing career. Ricky details why he made the decision to sign with Ginn racing over the Joe Gibbs development program. The move put him running Super Late Models in his home state of Florida under the tutelage of NASCAR Hall of Famer Mark Martin. When the Ginn team collapsed, the next move put him in an ARCA racecar for the legendary Ken Schrader's team. Their success led to a call from Kevin Harvick and a shot at the big leagues in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. In three years he racked up four top-five finishes in the Trucks and a handful of Xfinity Series starts. With long-time partner Monster Energy, the next step in his career was just one signature away. The plan had Carmichael splitting the seat with Kyle Busch in a Kyle Busch Motorsports Xfinity Series car. Just how did two separate Busch brother controversies lead to the collapse of a deal in the final hour? For the first time, Carmichael opens up about what happened and how it pretty much ended his NASCAR career. OPEN SEGMENT Before Ricky Carmichael came into the studio, The Download welcomed Trackhouse Racing team owner Justin Marks to the table. They touch on the sudden success of the new team. But, what Marks really came for, was to reveal the Darlington throwback scheme for both of his NASCAR Cup Series cars. The announcement and execution of the liveries had Dale Jr. breathless. ASKJR PRESENTED BY XFINITY Hannah Newhouse brings fan questions from Xfinity Twitter and the Dirty Mo Media YouTube about: JRM's 1,2,4,5 finish and how Door Bumper Clear is the Kyle Busch of Motorsports media. Monday Night Racing and how it has led to an increase in "wreck avoidance". How to achieve a Throwback Eclipse in NASCAR How Ross the Renter is a bona fide contender for the child. Oh, and Dale gives insight into Chastain's post-race talk with Martin Truex Jr. A possible DEI racecar graveyard To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
On this edition of The Dale Jr. Download, Dale Jr., co-host Mike Davis and special guests take a look back at some of the best Earnhardt stories of all-time. We reach far into the way-back machine to a couch discussion with NASCAR Hall of Famer Terry Labonte. Labonte was on the receiving end of one of the more famous shots from the front bumper of The Intimidator's No, 3 car at Bristol Motor Speedway. Just how did "Texas Terry" balance the awkwardness of being hunting buddies and fierce competitors during the peak of both of their careers. Dale Jr. and great friend Hank Parker Jr. talk about the relationship their father's had and how it helped their's blossom. It leads the table to learn of one of the funniest Dale Earnhardt hunting stories of all time! Dale Earnhardt's long-time car owner and great friend Richard Childress shares intimate details of a hunting trip that resulted in near tragedy. How did a campfire promise made on the trip keep Richard Childress racing after the death of Dale Earnhardt in 2001? Last but not least, one of the most popular guests on The Download, the legendary Ken Schrader, shares the story of all stories. Dale Jr. calls it "The Trip," and boy was it a trip! When you mix a teenage Dale Jr. with dirt track veteran Ken Schrader, and add in nudie magazines, beer, hitchhiking and a strip club, you get quite the damn story. It's a trip that drew the ire of "Dad" Earnhardt. As for Schrader? He ultimately paid the price. OPEN SEGMENT Before reminiscing on Earnhardt stories, Mike and Dale discuss something that has been on their minds leading up to the up-coming NASCAR Throwback Weekend at Darlington Raceway. The two friends share their real feelings about what has become a cherished part of the NASCAR season, what it may look like, and how the entire industry should approach it. ASKJR presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse brings fan questions to the table of truth. Who on the Dirty Mo Media team have habits that annoy me. It gets super-honest and hilarious. The Adam Petty shoes Dale showed on MTV Cribs back in the day. Racecar numbers slanting forward or backwards? Designing a racetrack from scratch. Plenty of time to pick on producer Matthew Dillner To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
The NFL and NASCAR combine as a pair of well-known 88's, three-time Pro Bowl tight end Greg Olsen joins two-time Daytona 500 winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. at the table of truth. Olsen opens up to Dale Jr. and co-host Mike Davis about his journey from a local New Jersey football family to playing in the National Football League. The two athletes met years ago, and forged a solid friendship through shared charitable endeavors.. Thanks our new sponsor Ally, Olsen walked into the Bojangles studio ready to hit the ground running. He detailed the ups and downs of his football life and the values instilled in him by his father that he took along with him every step of the way. Dale Jr. and Greg share their thoughts on the psychology of raising children in a sport and that there is more valuable lessons to be learned by a young mind than just winning a game. Pro football player Olsen is now coach-dad on the baseball field for his children's teams..  Olsen talks about the process of being recruited by colleges during his high school football career and the realities involved in the process. We learn that his father made Greg do something very difficult to let down the coaches from the schools that he wasn't choosing. In doing so he taught some valuable lessons. He also reveals his tenure with Notre Dame and the tough decision to vacate the famed Indiana-based academy for the palm trees of Miami beach and the University of Miami Hurricanes. Curiosity over the combine events that scout college players before they are drafter in the NFL, Dale Jr. gets Greg Olsen to open up about his experience at the event. It's a rare peek into what really happens between player reps, scouts and teams during the NFL Combine. It also lets us in the killer-instinct and mental game that Olsen used throughout much of his football career. The 6-foot-5, 255-pound tight end offers his memories of getting drafted by the Chicago Bears in the first round. Then a few years later, one of the worst trades in Bears history sent Olsen to the North Carolina to play for the Carolina Panthers. Olsen saw the majority of his success in Carolina, and gives us a look behind the curtain of NFL locker room life. What was it like playing with star quarterback Cam Newton? Was the polarizing figure a distraction? Olsen also details getting released by the Panthers and the many difficulties he faced in his year with the Seattle Seahawks, from the CoVid-19 pandemic to coaching, that helped lead to his decision to retire from the game. The biggest fight Olsen faced didn't come from a linebacker or a free-safety. It came from within his family. In 2012, he and wife Kara gave birth to twins T.J. and Talbot. T.J. was born with a congenital heart defect that required multiple surgeries, including three open-heart procedures. In 2021, his heart started to fail. T.J. received a heart transplant and is now an active nine-year-old boy. Olsen opens up about the decisions to share the incredibly tough journey with the public. OPEN SEGMENT Before Greg Olsen came into the Dirty Mo Media Bojangles studio, Dale Jr., Mike and the gang unpacked some feelings about the recent news of North Wilkesboro Speedway coming off the Lost Speedways list to host racing again. They explain how it’s now up to the fans to prove that North Wilkesboro, and other small market tracks like it, are viable racing facilities, by showing up to the races. Dale's ready to tailgate, are you? The revival has Dale Jr. so excited, that he is even thinking about hopping in a racecar himself at the historic North Carolina track. Wait, what? It's a revelation that had us all floored. ASKJR presented by Xfinity Hanna Newhouse brings fan questions from @XfinityRacing on twitter about: Dale Jr. joining the Fox broadcast team for the Talladega race. Cruising the Talladega infield The time Dale Jr. drove a Petty-43 Ford at Nashville Fairgrounds Dale Earnhardt's role in the motion picture "BASEketball.” To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
There's nothing like the bond of family. This week Dale Earnhardt Jr. welcomes in his sister Kelley Earnhardt Miller to sit down with their Aunt, Cathy Watkins, for a peek behind the curtain of the Earnhardt story. From V8 and Sedan street in Kannapolis, NC a motorsports legacy was born. The King of the dirt tracks, Ralph Earnhardt, was tearing up the circuit feeding his family with race wins and working on racecars. Of course, in 1952 came the birth of his son Dale Earnhardt, regarded as one of the best stock car racers of all-time. But before there was a Dale, there was a Cathy. Aunt Cathy wanted to be one of the boys. She loved washing parts in Ralph's backyard racing shop. But soon came womanhood and she was removed from the male-dominated garage. That was a tough pill to swallow. Ya see, Cathy was born into a true passion for racing. A few years later, Cathy was able to show her racing worth in what was then known as "Powder-Puff" races. The all-female races were an added bonus to a local short track racing program. But to an Earnhardt, it was a chance to win. In a span of decade, Cathy went ten-for-ten in Powder Puff events to become the only undefeated Earnhardt. Cathy gives a personal look into what it was like to grow up in the Earnhardt house in Kannapolis. She details the unrelenting strictness of Ralph Earnhardt and what was expected of them as children. She also reveals that Ralph Earnhardt did more than just work on his own cars, he worked on liquor cars for legendary racer and moonshiner Junior Johnson. Watkins lets us in on details about Ralph's health and the heart attack that caused his untimely death in 1973. She explains how seeing the shop door closed behind the house was crushing. After Ralph's passing, Dale Earnhardt used his iron-clad work ethic to create opportunities to race. He was a self-made racer that eventually made it to the pinnacle of the sport. That success on track came at the cost of his family life. Two failed marriages and drama created an inconsistent childhood for Dale Jr. and Kelley. The three Earnhardts talk about the complications of family dynamic. They share memories of the fight between Dale's mom Brenda and Dale's wife Teresa and more. Cathy's racing life didn't end after her ten race wins. She developed a relationship with one of Dale's crew members, Mike Watkins. She shares how they kept the relationship hidden from Dale Earnhardt for a while. The sneaking around led to a long-time marriage and a shared life on the road working souvenir haulers at NASCAR tracks and on the road for the Earnhardt family. Working at the track, Cathy developed a true passion for conversing with race fans. Oh, except that one time they said ugly things about her brother. That's a story you have to hear!   OPEN SEGMENT Before Aunt Cathy came into the studio, Dale Jr..and sister Kelley chatted about about: The NASCAR Xfinity Series dust-up on track between JR Motorsports driver Sam Mayer and Joe Gibbs Racing driver Ty Gibbs. They detail the fight that followed on pit road. Dale's enjoyment back behind the wheel at Martinsville. What's going on with the Cup cars on short tracks?   ASKJR Presented by Xfinity Hannah Newhouse hits Dale Jr. with fan questions talking about: JR Motorsports Late Model boys racing with Layne Riggs at Greenville Pickens Having Isla and Nicole at the track watching daddy race. Noah's White Claw, getting to like beer and developing Sun Drop and Vodka drinks. Should Ty Gibbs have taken off his helmet to fight? Five tracks Dale Jr. would want to race on more than once a year. Including a cryptic North Wilkesboro mention. Hmm. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Comments (77)

DUSTIN HATCHEL

Anyone else want to punch Mike in the face?

Jul 27th
Reply

Justin Broms

I get Jr has to have someone to talk to in order to move the show along ... But I just can't help but think about how much better it would be without Mike and Matt. I'd rather just hear Jr talk about his thoughts from the week then talk to the guest.. And I'm not even a Jr fan, I just can't stand Mike and Matt

May 27th
Reply

Chris Deiters

what a shame bell clair is getting tore down soon

Apr 28th
Reply

Jaden Consterk

I need this intro instrumental

Jan 21st
Reply

Jeff Wood

sorry to heat about your Uncle Danny Earnhardt. my prays go out to you and the whole Earnhardt family.

Dec 12th
Reply

Jeff Wood

Sorry yo hear about your Uncle Danny. My prayers go out the you and the whole Earnhart family.

Dec 11th
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Justin Broms

I just can't help but think how much better this podcast would be if it was just Jr and the guest

Dec 2nd
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Dustin Flatt

this is an amazing story and great episode

Oct 6th
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Артем Павлов

I enjoy listening and watching Dale Jr. songs.https://www.skylightpaycard.us/

Oct 4th
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Stephanie Baker

I love dale jr download. I'm normally not a dale jr fan

Sep 14th
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Gary Wenstrup

I enjoy listening and watching Dale Jr. I think he could be the future historian of NASCAR. Just wanted to say I have learned so much and I'm 60. All the guests have been great. I'm a big Corvette fan and a Jordan Taylor fan also. Big E was the best.

Sep 2nd
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Jeff Wood

I naybe in left field but I HATE! HATE! HATE! them. they are not good if you want different races have more dirt races. i live by walken glen in ny and gave never watch a race there.

Jul 9th
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Jolie Espinoza

what is this music

May 21st
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Jolie Espinoza

more more

May 3rd
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Jolie Espinoza

more more more

May 3rd
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Jolie Espinoza

be nice to Matt..i love his fanboy energy he brings to the show..makes me feel like less of an outsider.

Apr 29th
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JOHNNYxx REB

"Check the toe". I laughed my ass off at that

Mar 18th
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Kimberlea Lovelady

I get fired UP listening to this podcast, Thank you so much ❤💕💗

Mar 17th
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Kimberlea Lovelady

I was upset that nothing was said about Todd is the reason that they kiss the bricks at the brick yard.

Mar 16th
Reply (1)

Thomas Matlock

Dale and Crew, you all have the best podcast by far... keep it up!!!

Mar 14th
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