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Protests in cities across China show there is real anger over the zero-covid policy and the party's intrusion into every corner of people's lives. A neighbourhood surveillance system is mobilising people to police one another. Could public unrest threaten Xi Jinping’s plans for total control? The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, hear from somebody who has lived through street-level surveillance in China's most tightly policed region of Xinjiang. Sign up to our weekly newsletter here. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
How will the war in Ukraine play out in 2023? The Economist’s foreign and defence editors discuss the possible scenarios for the conflict with Russia. The best one for Ukraine is also the most dangerous. Tom Standage hostsPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Protests have become as bold as they are widespread—mostly against the country’s unsustainable zero-covid policies, but increasingly against the ruling regime itself. California’s wildfires have been growing more intense, and a new analysis shows just how much those blazes undo the good work of the state’s green policies. And a look at the evolution of the Great British Lad.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Europe’s crisis of energy and geopolitics, how crypto goes to zero (10:19) and the consequences of America’s success against organised crime (16:32)  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
At Thanksgiving Americans express gratitude for family, the harvest… and a big, juicy turkey.  Americans consume the most meat per person, but that's not good for the planet. In an episode first released in November 2021, we ask: could they cut back? The Economist’s Jon Fasman and his sons prepare the Thanksgiving turkey. We go back to a nationwide contest to find the perfect chicken. And Caroline Bushnell from The Good Food Institute discusses how to wean Americans off meat.   John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard.You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Players’ refusal to sing their national anthem at the World Cup has brought their country’s protests onto the global stage. We ask whether the discontent back home threatens the regime. A sober look at global economic data reveals a probable global recession—one that may not even tame raging inflation. And remembering Hebe de Bonafini, Argentina’s icon of resistance.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ben Hodges, a former commanding general of US Army Europe, believes that Ukraine has achieved “an irreversible momentum” since the liberation of Kherson. He predicts the country could declare victory against Russia by the summer. Host Anne McElvoy asks him how Ukraine could pull it off. He assesses whether Western countries will hold their nerve as the conflict drags on and what could happen if Vladimir Putin loses on the battlefield.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Grief about the deaths of more than 150 people in a crush has turned to anger, and the investigation into what actions were taken—or not taken—has turned political. Our correspondent looks into the vast effort to remake the car industry as automobiles turn into software platforms on wheels. And how Britain’s twee National Trust has waded into the culture wars. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Indonesia is the world’s third-largest producer of coal. Not only does it power the country, it powers the economy. But the country’s president, Joko Widodo, wants to change that. Indonesia is garnering global attention due to its stock of nickel and cobalt, core elements in the batteries needed for the booming electric vehicle industry. Can the government swap the fossil-fuel-powered economy to one that runs on batteries instead?On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood ask whether Indonesia can really go green. Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, sits down with Joko Widodo to find out if he is the man to wean the country off coal. Finance minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati and education minister Nadiem Makarim tell us how to train a generation of battery-makers. And Patrick Foulis, our business-affairs editor, warns of a red flag.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The power station in Zaporizhia has served as an impromptu military base for Russian forces—but danger is mounting and there are signs that troops may soon give it up. The sportswear-industry boom that has much of the world wearing high-performance kit may soon come to an end. And why teenage angst is such a good fit for horror films. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
COP27 was an arduous summit, with mixed results. A landmark agreement to create a new “loss and damage” fund was a historic achievement. But many delegates were disappointed by the lack of progress on decarbonising energy systems. In the final episode of our series, we explore what the final deal means for the future of climate action. Plus, we examine AFR100, a project that aims to pair climate action with economic growth in Africa.The Economist’s Rachel Dobbs reports on the gruelling final hours of negotiations at COP27. Ani Dasgupta of the World Resources Institute explains how the AFR100 project combines agriculture, technology and clever financing to capture carbon in Africa. And Mamadou Diakhite of the African Union Development Agency describes the impact the initiative is having on communities.Alok Jha hosts with Catherine Brahic, The Economist’s environment editor, and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our global energy and climate innovation editor.Listen to our mini-series at economist.com/COP27pod and follow all of The Economist’s climate coverage at economist.com/climate-change.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Executives have squeezed out Bob Chapek and re-anointed Bob Iger as boss. But the firm’s woes are less about leadership and more about the new economics of Hollywood. We ask why Zimbabwe’s teen mothers find it so hard to stay in school, and what can be done about it. And pigs prove their intelligence, again, by making up after confrontations.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 22 min Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Xi Jinping and Joe Biden met face-to-face for their first time as national leaders. Both men spoke about feeling the eyes of the world on them. What does the world need from this relationship? The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, talk to Wang Yong of Peking University and Daniel Russell, a former adviser to President Obama who has been in the room with Mr Xi and Mr Biden. The Economist’s Banyan columnist Dominic Zeigler analyses how their relationship impacts South-East Asia.Sign up to our weekly newsletter here. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
An issue ignored for three decades came to dominate the summit’s agenda: reparations to poor countries for climate-driven “loss and damage”. Alas, halting those coming losses did not feature much. Our correspondent speaks with a Ukrainian fighter pilot about defending the country’s airspace using mostly Soviet-era kit. And why some words sound the same across many languages.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is this the end of crypto? Also, why Indonesia matters (11:00) and Glenn Youngkin’s unique approach to Trumpism (19:40) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
As Donald Trump launches a third White House run, we report on the view from Mar-a-Lago and the rise of Ron DeSantis. Are attempted presidential comebacks ever a good idea? And how will a fractured Republican Party navigate the long road to 2024?The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass dissects Mr Trump’s announcement speech. We revisit Herbert Hoover’s hopes for a return to Pennsylvania Avenue. And Russell Vought of the Center for Renewing America explains why he’s backing Mr Trump.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The “Autumn statement” was filled with belt-tightening, from stealthy tax rises to public-service cuts. But perhaps the bitterest part of the pill has been left for the next government to swallow. As the World Cup begins in Qatar, controversies over preparedness and human rights threaten to overshadow what happens on the pitch. And New York City declares war on rats. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
As the end of COP27 nears, US energy secretary Jennifer Granholm talks to Anne McElvoy from the climate summit in Egypt. They discuss the impact the global energy crisis is having on Joe Biden’s green agenda, whether the hype around hydrogen will endure and if the president is willing to put aside a tussle with China for the sake of climate cooperation. Plus, Vijay Vaitheesawaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, measures the ambitions declared at COP27 against what is achievable.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Elon Musk gave Twitter’s remaining staff an ultimatum: commit to “working long hours at high intensity” for “hardcore” Twitter, or leave. We evaluate his reign so far. Under President Daniel Ortega, Nicaragua has become a one-party state. And remembering the long life of Anne Frank’s best friend. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Until last week, Sam Bankman-Fried - or SBF as he’s become known - was crypto’s poster-child. He was a regular in Washington, DC where he schmoozed journalists, regulators and lawmakers alike. He funded political campaigns and sponsored sports teams ranging from basketball to Formula One. For many, the floppy-haired, 30-year-old once-billionaire wasn’t just the face of his crypto trading firm FTX, he was the face of crypto. But last week, SBJ’s business, which was valued at $32bn at the start of the year, collapsed into bankruptcy and now he is being investigated by regulators and law-enforcement agencies.On this week’s “Money Talks’, hosts Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes ask whether the crypto phenomenon can survive the loss of a figurehead. They speak with Alesia Haas, the CFO of the second-largest exchange Coinbase. And hear from some of the recipients of SBF’s contributions to the effective altruism movement about what’s next. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Comments (215)

Carson Chiu

effective altruism aka the new justification why billionaires should pay less taxes

Nov 17th
Reply

Ami Zolf

#MahsaAmini #NikaShakarami

Oct 11th
Reply

Paul fan

the essence of corruption is the same as the west , the merely distinction is the pattern of monopoly or duopoly,

Oct 5th
Reply

Richard Fisher

the thing that Melinda doesn't realise yet is that all this affordable child care - paying another person, usually female to mum the kid whilst you work -has to be done by people. The reality is that there aren't that many women - or men- who want to spend their lives looking after the children of others, they do not aspire to that role, this is partly why it is so expensive. If lots of women are going to have careers and children then other women will have to have a different path 🤷🏻 They can't all be good female politicians AND be a good mother, kids need their mothers and their fathers. Distant parenting and parenting by proxy isn't great. It is the problem of the is/ought fallacy as Hulme spoke of. Utopia doesn't exist.

Sep 23rd
Reply

Bozorgmehr

Be our voice the regime is killing people massively in Iran #mahsaamini #mahsa_amini

Sep 22nd
Reply

Alex K.

General Clark's analysis of the Ukranian War in this podcast episode is excellent; so insightful. Thank you.

Sep 16th
Reply

Carson Chiu

"Well you see, the parthenon was dedicated to the goddess Athena. and we have discussed with an Anglican priest that Athena does not exist. therefore, the parthenon belongs to nobody so its free real estate for us brits!"

Sep 8th
Reply

Carson Chiu

lol this is disingenuous as fuck but that is basically what happens whenever brits discuss their stealing of antiquities and whatever new innovations they can create to justify their continued ownership yes it was commissioned by a greek king, but it was a greek king that ruled over Egypt. The stone was carved in egypt and was an edict announced to the egyptian people otherwise, why would the stone be written in two other languages that the ptolemys did not even speak until cleopatra?

Sep 7th
Reply

Vilis Ozolins

1111

Aug 26th
Reply

D Frame

The answer is no. AI will only do what it is programmed to do.

Aug 18th
Reply

ID17606932

College was still interested in reaching what power is, I visited Turkey this summer and I have read and enjoyed The Lord Of The Rings...Toilken is a gift

Aug 9th
Reply (1)

CJ

That guy who lost his cyrpto only lost €125 of a real cash stake.

Jul 28th
Reply

Asiya Sharafutdinova

1

Jul 22nd
Reply

Christoph Pirringer

the fact that you not once mentioned Israel bas a nuclear power is telling and does not speak well of you.

Jun 18th
Reply

Nwaichi Chineme

567k&&657+*&6& $4oj nnn fhudkhkrhkhbcdkjm8hbeokfi3d8bh5uik79cfc

Jun 8th
Reply

James Franklin

bhbl CB vvbnnn n bgnkbbngjibhbbvbbnlm vbnnn

May 17th
Reply

Ws Chia

Half way on the podcast, it was mentioned that there will be discussion on Paul Valca's high interest rates to tame the inflation. I was disappointed. Nonetheless, good and informative discussion.

Apr 29th
Reply

jo op

nlink

Apr 8th
Reply

Sedigheh Rahbar

Ukranians should proud of their responsible president.I hipe they win and experience peace as soon as they wish.

Apr 1st
Reply

Sarah Firth

pp,.

Mar 25th
Reply
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