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The Economist Podcasts

Author: The Economist

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Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

2459 Episodes
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Wages are going up and employees are walking out - some to strike, some never to come back. American workers have more leverage than before the pandemic. How permanent is this shift in power? The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch takes us to a picket line in Pennsylvania and we go back to an earlier walk out in Hollywood. Betsey Stevenson, one of President Obama’s economics advisors, tells us how long this could last.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
President Jair Bolsonaro’s early dismissal of the pandemic as “a little flu” presaged a calamitous handling of the crisis. We ask how a congressional investigation’s dramatic assessment of his non-actions may damage him. China’s test of a hypersonic, nuclear-capable glider may rattle the global weapons order. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of level-headed American statesman Colin Powell. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This year’s award celebrates two journalists working in countries where the screws are tightening on media freedom. Host Anne McElvoy asks Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Russia’s Dmitry Muratov how they are defending the free press. The editor of Novaya Gazeta explains why he has dedicated his medal to murdered colleagues and the co-founder of Rappler shares how she fights back in the face of online trolling.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Criminal gangs in north-western states, jihadists in the north-east, a rebellion in the south-east: kidnappers, warlords and cattle rustlers are making the country ungovernable. The new head of Samsung Electronics has a legacy to build—and aims to do so by breaking into the cut-throat business of processor chips. And the sci-fi classic “Dune” gets a good cinematic treatment at last. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Higher inflation looks likely to last into 2022. The Bank of England could be the first big central bank to raise interest rates—why might it make the first move? Also, our team explores how real-time data are upending economics. And Michael Dell, boss of the eponymous tech firm, on why founders are leaving Silicon Valley for Texas and why PCs are still sexy. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks  For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Russia continues to pile pressure on the country, and will soon have the power to cut off its natural gas. Our correspondent pays a visit to find how Ukrainians cope. The simplest solution to renewables’ intermittency is to move electricity around—but that requires vast new international networks of seriously beefy cables. And Canada’s version of American football is wasting away.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Babbage: on Babbage

Babbage: on Babbage

2021-10-1932:282

On the 150th anniversary of the death of Charles Babbage, we retrace the footsteps of the brilliant but irascible British inventor, mathematician, and engineer. Host Kenneth Cukier investigates why Babbage is hailed by some as the grandfather of the computer, while others argue his contribution is overblown. And could letting go of parts of his legacy help unleash the future of computing? For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sir David Amess was killed doing what he loved: speaking directly with voters. We examine the dangers inherent in the “constituency surgeries” that British politicians cherish. The fight against tuberculosis is made harder by mutations that confer drug resistance; we look at research that has traced nearly every one of them. And why Andy Warhol is big in Iran, again. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The green revolution won’t be cheap, but there is enough money to make it happen - if it goes to the right places. What role can finance play in steering economies towards a low-carbon future? Elemental Excelerator’s Dawn Lippert tells us why Hawaii is the best place to help climate start-ups find funding. Tariq Fancy, who ran sustainable investments for Blackrock, asks whether environmental investing makes any difference at all.  Hosted by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, with environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, our briefings editor.   For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/climatepod and you can sign up to our fortnightly climate newsletter at economist.com/theclimateissue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A paltry GDP rise is down to the pandemic, power and property. We ask what growing pains President Xi Jinping will endure in the name of economic reforms. Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, will probably end up in the second round of next year’s election; who will stand against him is ever more unpredictable. And fixing meeting inefficiency with an 850-year-old idea. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the first big energy shock of the green era, how covid-19 will move from pandemic to endemic (11:29) and our Charlemagne columnist assesses the odds of “Polexit” versus a “dirty remain” (17:21)    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Republicans and Democrats don't agree on much, but in Facebook they’ve found a common enemy. When whistleblower Frances Haugen told a congressional hearing the company knew its products damaged the mental health of its young users, senators rushed to proclaim they would get something done. How harmful is Facebook? And will politicians take action? The Economist’s Hal Hodson tells us we need more evidence to understand social media’s impact on wellbeing. We go back to when video games caused panic on Capitol Hill. And The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass explains why this scandal is politically potent.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The effort to investigate last year’s port explosion in Beirut has fired up political and religious tensions—resulting in Lebanon’s worst violence in years. We speak with Dmitry Muratov, a Russian journalist who shared this year’s Nobel peace prize, about what the award means to him, and to press freedom. And why autocratic regimes like to snap up English football clubs. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Fourteen years after “The Sopranos'' ended, the creator of the hit TV series explains why his show is reaching new and younger audiences. Host Anne McElvoy asks whether mobsters have a moral compass and why audiences root for the patriarch Tony Soprano? The Hollywood veteran talks about bringing the story back to life in the prequel movie “The Many Saints of Newark” and why it should be enjoyed in a cinema, not at home. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A fossil-fuel scramble reveals energy markets in desperate need of a redesign. We examine what must be done to secure a renewable future. Throngs of Hong Kong residents fleeing China’s tightening hand are settling in Britain; our correspondent finds an immigrant group unlike any that came before. And the boom in “femtech” entrepreneurs at last focusing on women’s health. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This year's Nobel prize celebrates the "credibility revolution" that has transformed economics since the 1990s. Today most notable new work is not theoretical but based on analysis of real-world data. Host Rachana Shanbhogue speaks to two of the winners, David Card and Joshua Angrist, and our Free Exchange columnist Ryan Avent explains how their work has brought economics closer to real life. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks  For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As the Taliban’s closest ally, the country bears a big responsibility for Afghanistan’s fate. We examine its diplomatic risks and opportunities. Mastercard is pressing porn purveyors this week; we look at how financial companies are reluctantly stepping up as the internet’s police. And a timely social-inequality take drives South Korea’s “Squid Game” to the top of Netflix's charts worldwide. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Babbage: Rocks in space

Babbage: Rocks in space

2021-10-1231:252

A probe to study the Trojan asteroids is expected to take off this week, but what will this mission uncover about the formation of the solar system? Also, we explore new technology to observe asteroids, as well as a mission to deflect an incoming celestial object. And, we hear from the Nobel co-laureate in Physiology or Medicine, Ardem Patapoutian, about temperature and pressure sensing. Alok Jha hosts.  For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After a court ruling in Poland that is an affront to a core European Union principle, Poles hit the streets—fearing a “Pol-exit” they do not want. Who will back down? Hydrogen has been touted for decades as a fuel with green credentials. At last its time has come. And the herd of unicorns popping up in Mexico. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Lowering greenhouse gas emissions won’t be enough to stop the world from overheating. Carbon needs to be sucked out of the atmosphere. But can that be done quickly enough -- and on what scale? Nathalie Seddon of the Nature-Based Solutions Initiative explores the ways ecosystems can be enhanced to store carbon. And we go to Iceland to visit the world’s largest direct air capture facility that removes carbon from the air, which is then injected into volcanic rock. Hosted by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, with environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, our briefings editor.   For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/climatepod and you can sign up to our fortnightly climate newsletter at economist.com/theclimateissue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (177)

Meg M

why with covid jabs does one not include the value of natural immunity?

Oct 19th
Reply

Meg M

a concern with warming concerns is that many rules and laws will affect the common worker and not large scale industry. so who suffers?

Oct 14th
Reply

Ilkin Safarov

hi, how can I find the transcript of this podcast?

Oct 4th
Reply

km

Just wait until food prices skyrocket from climate change disruption of agriculture. Doom.

Oct 1st
Reply

Inge Leimer

my I l of

Sep 28th
Reply

Tom MacDonald

I know nobody is listening or reading these comments but oh my God the guests that are on here are sophomoric in their intellectual capacity about talking for climate change it's atrocious. quote on quote the world at 3 degrees more will be completely changed." and then she said we really don't know we have models so far. And then she said it's hard to imagine that there will be some places in the world that will be uninhabitable. She should have a quick look at geography because there are many places in the world currently that are uninhabitable. The main thrust that climate change is affecting our world still holds but the way these people go about it is second-year University at best. So disappointing to hear and of course they're talking as if Australia can make any goddamn difference in climate change to start with! or Britain for that matter. or even Canada where I come from. The two main emitters of carbon are India and China who are both excluded from carbon reduction. So how serious are they? The answer is not very.

Sep 28th
Reply (1)

Jarrod Newell

Finally calling out the left. Your ideas aren't faultless.

Sep 6th
Reply

km

Keep rewarding the psychopaths in our society with leadership roles, enormous financial and ego incentives, and of course the collective good suffers. Part of the solution lies in having non-psychopathic leadership. Society needs to be immunized against promoting psychopaths with more awareness about abnormal psychology. Too many are fooled by the superficial charm and confidence of these self-serving individuals.

Aug 13th
Reply

R.W. Lee

4th photo 📸 is

Aug 13th
Reply

Moshe Wise

One of the guests describes China's massive mess-up with SARS 2 as a "success." Perhaps she needs to reconsider this odd error

Jul 21st
Reply

Itay Avi

When Ken started talking about copper I got very excited that he may bring up Ea Nassir but he didn't :(

Jul 15th
Reply

Meg M

and if someone had the infection then they have natural immunity. this needs to be part of the conversation

Jun 15th
Reply

km

Read Michael Sandel's book.

Jun 5th
Reply

Mohammad Zaman Basir Heravi

#RayDalio

Jun 1st
Reply

brandon cliff

I would really like to know how much time and effort is put into solving a setup or homicide and if it so happens what going to happen next, does the case ever gets resolved!👀

May 8th
Reply

Travis Cutler

the economist being an apologist for right wing thugs in Columbia while blaming Venezuela somehow. Standard operating procedure. propaganda works......

May 7th
Reply (1)

Meg M

YES Ms Klobuchar! keep up the great work 💪!!

May 7th
Reply

Meg M

so interesting the ruling in the Supreme Court regarding Juvenile and age applies to criminality but it doesn't apply to identifying gender interesting

May 6th
Reply

Meg M

thank you for your service Ms Duckworth. It would be interesting to give your perspective on the similarities of the cancel culture in the US and communist China parrallels as well as you thoughts of china bullying on Taiwan

May 4th
Reply

Meg M

ooh Hungary's government rule sounds like the subtle changes occurring in US public schools only in the US it is the very left/cancel culture push. both of which are WRONG.

Apr 30th
Reply
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