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The Economist Podcasts

Author: The Economist

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Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

2512 Episodes
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Things were all smiles after negotiations resumed—but it is difficult to see how a middle ground can be reached in Iran’s nuclear ambitions. Apple’s surprise move to permit repairs to its hardware reflects the growing “right to repair” movement, and a shift in the notion of tech ownership. And the “grab lists” that museum curators prefer not to talk about. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here  www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The rivalry between China and America will intensify in 2022 as each side strives to demonstrate the superiority of its system of government. As China uses its stage-managed Communist Party congress to cement Xi Jinping in power, Joe Biden and the Democratic Party are expected to face a drubbing in America’s mid-term elections. Editor-in-Chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, US editor John Prideaux and host Tom Standage assess the competition between the two superpowers.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer And we would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/worldaheadsurvey.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Governments’ rapid responses to a new coronavirus strain were wise. But much is still to be learned about the Omicron variant before longer-term policies can be prescribed. Vietnam’s government wants to create internationally competitive firms, and a growing new class of billionaires suggests the plan is working. And research suggests that social distancing comes naturally to bees under pathogenic threat. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here  www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the venture-capital industry is being turbocharged, what the fate of star tennis-player Peng Shuai reveals about one-party rule in China (10'52) and, when a museum is on fire, how do you decide what to save? (19'09)   Tell us what you think at www.economist.com/epsurvey     Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
At Thanksgiving Americans express gratitude for family, the harvest… and a big, juicy turkey. Americans consume the most meat per person, but that's not good for the planet. Could they cut back?   The Economist’s Jon Fasman and his sons prepare the Thanksgiving turkey. We go back to a nationwide contest to find the perfect chicken. And Caroline Bushnell from The Good Food Institute discusses how to wean Americans off meat.     John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.   We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/uspodsurvey  For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As President Recep Tayyip Erdogan keeps pushing his upside-down economic ideas, the currency plummets and an immiserated population grows restless. Sunday’s presidential election in Honduras will be a test of the country’s democracy; fears abound of the deadly protests that marred the last vote. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of Rossana Banti, a storied, lifelong anti-fascist campaigner. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In 1956 the Suez Crisis forced the Egyptian-born cookery writer and her Jewish family to flee Cairo for London. She tells Anne McElvoy why she collected the recipes of fellow refugees to keep the flavours of home alive and what food tells us about stories of migration. The octogenarian author of “A Book of Middle Eastern Food” and “Med” spills the secrets of her kitchen – from embracing mistakes to what to cook for the festive season.  We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/economistaskssurvey And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A three-way coalition has struck a deal to govern. We ask who’s who among top ministers and what’s what on the newly centre-left agenda. A shortage of lorry drivers has sharpened Britain’s supply-chain woes; our correspondent hitches a ride with one, finding why it is such a hard job to fill. And what Maine’s new “right to food” actually means. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Venture capital is no longer embodied by Silicon Valley investing in its own backyard. A new wave of both capital and competition is powering new ideas across sectors and around the world. Our correspondent Arjun Ramani and host Rachana Shanbhogue speak to veteran VCs, newcomers and founders to find out whether the innovation being funded will be worth the risks. With Roelof Botha, partner at Sequoia Capital; Rana Yared, general partner at Balderton; Ali Partovi, chief executive of Neo; Dr Maria Chatzou Dunford, founder of Lifebit.ai and Rachel Delacour, co-founder of Sweep. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurvey  Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks  For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Prices are up all over, especially in America. But whether the world’s largest economy is part of the problem or just suffering the same symptoms will determine how to fix it. Autocratic leaders of middling-sized countries are having a field day as America has relinquished its world-policeman role. And what makes some languages fail to develop a word for blue? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here  www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Babbage: Reservoir dogs

Babbage: Reservoir dogs

2021-11-2331:063

The coronavirus could be lurking in many species of animals, according to a new report. We analyse the implications for human health. Also, what is the relationship between an unbalanced gut microbiome and autism? And, the father of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy died this month. Aaron Beck’s daughter, the psychiatrist Judith Beck, tells us how her father turned the world of psychiatry upside down. Kenneth Cukier hosts. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/babbagesurvey.   For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Additional audio used with permission from the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A Delta wave is driving restrictions and restrictions are driving unrest. Vaccine mandates like that enacted by Austria may be the only way to end the cycle. We examine the dim prospects for Peng Shuai, a Chinese tennis star who accused a senior politician of sexual assault. And a broader view of modern art at the UAE’s new Guggenheim museum. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The presidential election will now go to a run-off—between candidates of political extremes. We ask how that polarisation will affect promised constitutional reform. Our correspondent visits Mali to witness the largest current Western push against jihadism, finding that governments and peacekeepers in the Sahel are losing the war. And women seek a more level playing field in competitive gaming. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: a new era of big government, the revival of far-right ideas in France (10:34) and our Bartleby column on the business phrasebook (19:04)      Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The bare facts of the Kyle Rittenhouse case are not disputed. In August 2020 he shot dead two people, and injured a third, during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin. But to the right the teenager is an American hero and to the left he’s a reckless vigilante. What does the case tell us about gun culture and race in America?  We hear how the media on the left and right told the Rittenhouse story and go back to the origins of a notorious self-defence law. The Economist’s Daniel Knowles explains why guns divide America. John Prideaux hosts with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Some factors that drive relentless growth in state spending are eternal; some are getting stronger. Our correspondent outlines a big-government future. We examine how MacKenzie Scott, an accidental billionaire, is revolutionising big-money philanthropy. And Moroccan hoteliers rail against a law that forbids beds for the unwed. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
When covid-19 lockdowns shuttered his productions, the renowned satirist vented his frustrations in a new form – a mock-epic poem called “Pandemonium”. He talks to Anne McElvoy about seeking inspiration in the works of John Milton and how to find humour in difficult days. Is any joke out of bounds for the creator of the television shows “The Thick of It” and “Veep” and what’s on his pick-me-up reading list? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Mikheil Saakashvili, a former president, is seven weeks into a hunger strike and protests supporting him are proliferating. We ask where the country is headed. China’s state-sponsored industrial espionage is growing more overt and more organised—and little can be done to stop it. And how to figure out the past tense of verbs like “green-light” and “gaslight”. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Until recently worrying about rising prices seemed like a relic of the 1970s. Now it borders on a global obsession. As new data on inflation from around the world exceed expectations, host Rachana Shanbhogue asks whether central bankers will be able to curb the trend. Plus, we crunch the numbers in our alternative inflation “Uluru” index. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks  For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The meeting between superpower presidents was cordial and careful, but it will take far more than a video call to smooth such frosty relations. Europe once had an enviable international rail network—one it must revive if the bloc is to meet its climate targets. And the costly and sometimes dangerous lengths South Koreans are going to for flattering photographs. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (182)

Kim Kristiansen

I op opop bl dr

Nov 23rd
Reply

Richard Fisher

wow Charlotte giving it full manipulation at 8 mins in. CrOsseD StatE LiNeS... military style weapon, skips that Kyle was hit by the skateboard and skips that the glock was pointed at him before he shot back. this isn't an objective analysis

Nov 22nd
Reply (1)

Shahrzad Korrani

i mean Are you guys hearing yourself??? America is like we won't do anything but Iran has to honor the agreements😑😑😑😑😑

Nov 8th
Reply

Colin Moore

sleepy Joe is screwed

Nov 2nd
Reply

Meg M

why with covid jabs does one not include the value of natural immunity?

Oct 19th
Reply

Meg M

a concern with warming concerns is that many rules and laws will affect the common worker and not large scale industry. so who suffers?

Oct 14th
Reply

Ilkin Safarov

hi, how can I find the transcript of this podcast?

Oct 4th
Reply

km

Just wait until food prices skyrocket from climate change disruption of agriculture. Doom.

Oct 1st
Reply

Inge Leimer

my I l of

Sep 28th
Reply

Tom MacDonald

I know nobody is listening or reading these comments but oh my God the guests that are on here are sophomoric in their intellectual capacity about talking for climate change it's atrocious. quote on quote the world at 3 degrees more will be completely changed." and then she said we really don't know we have models so far. And then she said it's hard to imagine that there will be some places in the world that will be uninhabitable. She should have a quick look at geography because there are many places in the world currently that are uninhabitable. The main thrust that climate change is affecting our world still holds but the way these people go about it is second-year University at best. So disappointing to hear and of course they're talking as if Australia can make any goddamn difference in climate change to start with! or Britain for that matter. or even Canada where I come from. The two main emitters of carbon are India and China who are both excluded from carbon reduction. So how serious are they? The answer is not very.

Sep 28th
Reply (1)

Jarrod Newell

Finally calling out the left. Your ideas aren't faultless.

Sep 6th
Reply

km

Keep rewarding the psychopaths in our society with leadership roles, enormous financial and ego incentives, and of course the collective good suffers. Part of the solution lies in having non-psychopathic leadership. Society needs to be immunized against promoting psychopaths with more awareness about abnormal psychology. Too many are fooled by the superficial charm and confidence of these self-serving individuals.

Aug 13th
Reply

R.W. Lee

4th photo 📸 is

Aug 13th
Reply

Moshe Wise

One of the guests describes China's massive mess-up with SARS 2 as a "success." Perhaps she needs to reconsider this odd error

Jul 21st
Reply

Itay Avi

When Ken started talking about copper I got very excited that he may bring up Ea Nassir but he didn't :(

Jul 15th
Reply

Meg M

and if someone had the infection then they have natural immunity. this needs to be part of the conversation

Jun 15th
Reply

km

Read Michael Sandel's book.

Jun 5th
Reply

Mohammad Zaman Basir Heravi

#RayDalio

Jun 1st
Reply

brandon cliff

I would really like to know how much time and effort is put into solving a setup or homicide and if it so happens what going to happen next, does the case ever gets resolved!👀

May 8th
Reply

Travis Cutler

the economist being an apologist for right wing thugs in Columbia while blaming Venezuela somehow. Standard operating procedure. propaganda works......

May 7th
Reply (1)
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