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The Economist asks

Author: The Economist

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One question posed to a high-profile newsmaker, followed up with lively debate. Anne McElvoy hosts The Economist's chat show. Published every Friday on Economist Radio.

232 Episodes
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On November 9th 1989, Anne McElvoy and Conny Günther were in East Berlin watching the impossible—the fall of the Berlin Wall. Thirty years later they retrace their steps to find out how decades of division transformed and still shape German lives. They talk to those who risked their lives tunnelling under the wall to help people escape, delve into the surveillance files kept on them by the Stasi, and hear from a new generation about the future of post-Wall Germany Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Brexit deadline has been delayed and Britain is now heading for a snap general election. Anne McElvoy asks José Manuel Barroso, former president of the European Commission, whether Boris Johnson can win on December 12th and “get Brexit done”. Also, will Britain’s exit from the EU threaten workers’ rights? And, as an opera devotee, which work does he think would best serve as a guide—or a warning—to the unfolding political drama?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams was the first African-American woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in 2018, narrowly losing to the incumbent she accused of suppressing non-white votes. Anne McElvoy asks what the fraught Georgia race taught her, whether identity politics is a benefit or drawback to her party -  and whether she would serve as Joe Biden’s vice-president. Also, who would Abrams, as spy novelist, like to see in the role of James Bond?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
America’s withdrawal from northern Syria and the subsequent Turkish invasion have overturned the power balance in the region, displacing tens of thousands of America’s former allies, the Kurds. Ash Carter helped build that alliance as US secretary of defence. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, asks him how America’s actions in Syria will affect its ability to deal with future threats. Also, why Secretary Carter believes some American companies are too quick to abandon American values. And, how to run the biggest organisation in the world For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
In his trilogy of documentaries the filmmaker Asif Kapadia rejected the traditional tools of the trade. Instead, he painstakingly reconstructed the lives of Formula One champion Ayrton Senna, acclaimed singer Amy Winehouse and legendary footballer Diego Maradona almost entirely from archival footage. Anne McElvoy asks Kapadia whether this forensic approach reaches closer to the real person behind the myth. They talk about the difficulty of interviewing a champion of deceit and whether it matters if the hero of the story is sometimes a villain. Also, what does it take to be the greatest footballer of all time? And at what cost? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Britain’s relationship with Europe dominated the last years of Margaret Thatcher’s premiership. Anne McElvoy asks Charles Moore, a Conservative columnist and her authorised biographer, whether the roots of Brexit can be traced back to the Iron Lady’s fierce tussles over British sovereignty. They talk about the machinations of her inner circle during her final years in power and her pioneering climate advocacy. Also, the “nightmare” of managing Boris Johnson, and what really happened at those louche Spectator lunches For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The link between capitalism and progress is being questioned. Should big business step into the breach where politics is gridlocked? In a New York buzzing with world leaders and talk of impeachment, Anne McElvoy interviews Michael Bloomberg, the businessman, philanthropist and former mayor of the city, at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum. She asks him if CEOs are the new politicians and whether he thinks Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren has the edge in the White House race. Also, why even billionaires yearn to stop and smell the roses For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
In his palatial headquarters, Ren Zhengfei, founder and CEO of the Chinese telecommunications giant, explains how the American boycott has hurt Huawei and how he will fight back. He outlines plans to sell Huawei’s 5G technology to Western companies, allowing them to compete on a level playing field. David Rennie, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, and Patrick Foulis, our business affairs editor, also ask Mr Ren about the US-China trade war, unfettered access to the internet in China and the protests in Hong Kong. And, does he plan to retire any time soon? Anne McElvoy hosts For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The author of “The Testaments” and “The Handmaid’s tale” debates whether her novels are speculative fiction and how women's rights have evolved since she began writing in the early 1960s. Anne McElvoy asks Margaret Atwood whether she benefitted from a “Trump bump”, if #MeToo is an invincible weapon and what makes a “bad” feminist? Also, does she admire the Queen?http://economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The prolific author and podcaster explains why people so often misunderstand strangers and the consequences when they do, from police injustice to Ponzi schemes. Anne McElvoy asks Malcolm Gladwell why humans are so bad at distinguishing lies from the truth, whether judges should be replaced with AI, and if true strangers still exist in the age of social media For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Comments (3)

Mahmud Gadauji

This gentleman was just rambling around making no point. Those who earn their money should decide on how to spend it. Only a reasonable amount of tax is to be collected. If the Governments will end up collecting one's money after a very difficult climb up to the riches, then I believe it is logical to state that no one will struggle to earn much money and in turn creating opportunities for others.

Oct 27th
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Ralph OFUYO

Would love to hear more about the NHS and it's IT headchaes/lessons

Nov 23rd
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Ja'net Sheridan

I so love the stories and reporting done by this podcast. Great journalism

Mar 29th
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