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It escapes me

It escapes me

2022-06-2102:0714

A phrase about forgetting something
Onboarding

Onboarding

2022-06-1301:5313

Starting a new job means becoming familiar with new duties!
Thereby hangs a tale

Thereby hangs a tale

2022-06-0602:1210

When there is more to say....
The royal treatment

The royal treatment

2022-05-3102:1414

Are you ready to feel like a king or a queen?
Tell me about it

Tell me about it

2022-05-2402:5327

Sometimes people say something that you can’t help but agree with. Learn a new phrase.
Creatively bankrupt

Creatively bankrupt

2022-05-1702:5814

Do you ever feel like your creativity just vanishes? Here's a phrase for that situation.
As if

As if

2022-05-1003:0320

A phrase to use when someone says something that is ridiculous or blatantly untrue.
Bad hair day

Bad hair day

2022-05-0401:5431

How are you looking today? Could you be having a bad hair day?
Make the English you speak sound more natural
Promises, promises

Promises, promises

2022-04-1902:1240

Learn a new expression about not believing someone’s promises.
Not see hide nor hair

Not see hide nor hair

2022-04-1202:0724

Sometimes it’s impossible to find someone. Here's a phrase to use in this situation.
A curate's egg

A curate's egg

2022-04-0502:1925

Learn an odd expression which means something is a little good but mainly bad
That'll be the day

That'll be the day

2022-03-2902:2936

Learn a phrase about things that are unlikely to happen.
Gathering dust

Gathering dust

2022-03-2202:2819

What’s gathering dust in your house?
Easier said than done

Easier said than done

2022-03-1502:1227

Talking about doing things can be easy, but doing them can be a bit more complicated.
The plot thickens

The plot thickens

2022-03-0802:1515

A phrase for when a situation becomes more mysterious.
All at sea

All at sea

2022-03-0102:0924

Discover more about this nautical phrase in The English We Speak.
Don't mind me

Don't mind me

2022-02-2202:0243

If you want tell someone to ignore what you’re doing, what can you say?
Cramp my style

Cramp my style

2022-02-1502:2627

Who’s cramping your style?
You couldn't make it up

You couldn't make it up

2022-02-0802:0634

Learn an expression for unbelievable events.
Comments (318)

عالم التطور تكنلوجي

hi

Jun 21st
Reply

sara k

Helen: Hello, and welcome to The English We Speak. My name is Helen. Steve: And I'm Steve. How are you, Helen? Helen: Actually, I'm feeling very positive, thanks Steve. Steve: Why? What's happened? Helen: Well, I found out on Friday that I'm getting a promotion at BBC Learning English, then on Saturday I won £1,000 on the lottery. Steve: Wow, that's brilliant! Helen: Yes, and then on Sunday it got even better. I found out that some paintings I've done are going to be displayed at an art gallery in London! Steve: That's amazing, Helen – you're on a roll at the moment, aren't you! Helen: Er… I'm on a what? Steve: On a roll… Helen: Roll? I don't roll… I walk, or sometimes I run if I want some exercise. A football rolls if I kick it across the ground. Steve: Sure, a football rolls, but you can be on a roll. It means you're experiencing lots of success or good luck at the moment. Helen: I see, the phrase 'on a roll' means you are having lots of good luck in your life. Let's listen to an example. Man: I hear your sister's getting married. Woman: Yeah, she met this amazing guy while she was working in the theatre in London, and six months later they're engaged! And then, yesterday she was offered the lead part in the theatre's new play. She's really on a roll! Helen: So that woman is excited because her sister is on a roll – she met an amazing guy who she's now engaged to, and then she was offered the lead part in a play. Steve: Yes, if you're on a roll it means lots of things are going well for you at the moment. Here’s another example. Man 1: How are Arsenal doing in the Premier League these days? Man 2: Oh, they're totally on a roll! They've won all three games this month, including the one against Man United! Helen: So that man thinks his favourite football team are on a roll because they've won all their games? Steve: Yes, they've won every game they've played this month – they're playing really well. Text message sound Helen: Oh, wait a second. I've got a text message from my husband. Steve: What's he saying – have you won the lottery again? Are you still on a roll? Sound effect of car braking suddenly Helen: No… actually, he's just had his bike stolen, and earlier he lost his car keys! Steve: Oh, dear, that's bad luck! Unlike you, he's definitely not on a roll. Helen: No… I'd better go and help him look for those keys. Bye! Steve: Bye!

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Neil: Hello and welcome to The English We Speak. I'm Neil Edgeller. Feifei: And I'm Feng Feifei. Neil, you look terrible! You've got red eyes, grey skin and your voice is so rough! Neil: Oh, Feifei, you're right. I feel terrible. I went to a leaving do last night and I drank too much beer... and wine... Feifei: A leaving do? Do? Neil: Yes, a leaving do. A colleague has got a job at another company and had a party to celebrate his last day. Feifei: So it was a party? Neil: Yes, that's what I said. It was a leaving do. Feifei: Right, so 'do' is a noun and it means party? Neil: Yes, that's right. It's British English. Urgh. Feifei: Ah, so in British English, another word for party is 'do'. A: Did you enjoy Mary's wedding? B: Oh, it was an amazing do. The food was delicious and there was an excellent band playing. We danced all night! A: Oh, hi Dave. We're having a bit of a do on Saturday and wondered if you and Sally would like to come over? B: Thanks, that would be great. You two always put on a good do. Feifei: So is this a common word? Neil: Yes, you'll hear it all the time: especially in certain phrases. Feifei: Like what? Neil: Well, a leaving do. Feifei: A leaving do. Neil: And a bit of a do – we're having a bit of a do. Feifei: A bit of a do. So, was it a good leaving do last night? Neil: Um, yes, yes, yes it was very good... I think. I can't really remember... Feifei: Go home and get some sleep! Neil: That's a very, very good idea. Bye for now. Feifei: Bye!

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Neil: Hello and welcome to The English We Speak, I'm Neil Edgeller. Feifei: And I'm Feng Feifei. Neil you're looking very relaxed and healthy today. Neil: Oh, thanks Feifei, I've just come back from a camping holiday actually. Feifei: A camping holiday?! Most people come back from camping looking like they need another holiday because of the lack of comfortable facilities! Neil: Ah, well actually I cheated. I went glamping. Feifei: Glamping? Neil: Yes, glamping. Although I was staying in a tent, it was already set up when we arrived at the campsite, we slept on proper beds and even had a kitchen with a cooker and fridge. Feifei: Wow, that sounds more glamorous than camping! Neil: Exactly! Glamorous camping. Put those two words together and you get… Both: Glamping. Feifei: Oh I see… glamping is a word made up of two words: glamorous… Neil: And camping. Feifei: It's glamorous because there are lots of facilities you don't normally get in a tent, such as proper beds and even a kitchen. Example A: I really hate camping… It reminds me of miserable holidays as a kid, sleeping on a cold, wet floor and eating horrible food! B: You should try glamping. You get to spend time in the great outdoors but in a proper bed and with nice meals! It's wonderful! Feifei: So do people really use this word 'glamping'? Neil: Yes, it's quite a new word and a bit of a joke, but you can read it and you do hear people use it because there are more and more companies offering glamping holidays. Feifei: Hmm… Neil: What's up Feifei? I know you're a city girl, but wouldn't you like to try glamping? Feifei: I'm not sure about that… Is there room service? Neil: Room service?! That's a step too far! I'm afraid that's too glamorous for glamping! Feifei: OK, how about a spa and massage room?! Neil: Spa and massage room?! Honestly, it's still camping. Bye for now. Feifei: Ha ha! Bye!

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Li: Hello, I'm Li and welcome to The English We Speak. Rob: And hello, I'm Rob. Now Li, I need to tell you something. You know John in the office? Well, he's got a new job. Li: That's great news. How is he feeling? Rob: Well, obviously, he's over the moon. Li: What? John is 'over the moon'? Is he going to be an astronaut? Rob: No Li! Well, I don't think so. I just mean he's extremely pleased and happy. Li: Oh I see. I know in the nursery rhyme Hey Diddle Diddle, "the cow jumped over the moon", but I've never heard of a man jumping over the moon, so he must be very, very, very excited. Rob: It's just a saying Li. He's not actually jumping over the moon. We say it to show that he's so excited that, in theory, he could jump as high as the moon! Li: And over it! Rob: Li, do you know how high the moon really is? Li: No, but I know it's a long way away. Rob: It certainly is! Let's hear some more examples of people being over the moon... When Jane heard she had won the lottery, she was over the moon. When he found out he'd passed his exam he was over the moon. I can't hide it; I'm over the moon about getting a promotion. Li: So, being 'over the moon' means being very excited. Rob: Of course John is not only over the moon about getting a new job, he's also on cloud nine. Li: What? Now he's on cloud nine?! Is he going to be an airline pilot then, or even a bird? Rob: Nothing like that. It's just another way of saying he's very excited and happy about something – he's up on a very high cloud – cloud nine. Li: I see. Rob: Here's some more examples… Julie got married last week and she's been on cloud nine ever since. I've never seen Fred so happy; he's been on cloud nine since he passed his exams! Rob: So now we know what to say about someone who's very excited and happy. Li: Yes, two good phrases. So, come on Rob, if John is not going to be a pilot or an astronaut, what is his new job? Something just as exciting maybe? Rob: No – he's going to be an accountant. Li: Oh, boring! Are you sure? Who is that I can see jumping over the moon? Look! Rob: Is it a cow? Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Li: No, no, no – it's John – he really is over the moon! And he really is a star! Rob: Come on Li, let's get down to earth and say goodbye to everybody. Li: Bye! See you next week for more The English We Speak. Rob, I think he got stuck over there!

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Li: Hello, I'm Li and welcome to The English We Speak, and today I'm here with Rob. Hi Rob. Rob: Hello Li. Now come on Li, concentrate, I need you to help me finish this quiz in the newspaper. If I get all the questions right, I might win a holiday. Li: Oh right. I love quizzes, especially if it means you can win a holiday! OK Rob, what's your next question? Rob: Right. It says here, what is the capital city of Chile? Li: Easy. Santiago. Rob: Good. Next, what is the name of the world's largest ocean? Li: The Pacific – of course! Rob: Wow – you're good Li. You really know your onions. Li: I know my onions? Err, was there a question about onions?! Rob: No Li! Li: Good, because that is one thing I don't know anything about, onions – except that they make me cry. Rob: Don't cry Li. It's a compliment. If someone says you know your onions, it means you are experienced in something or you know a lot about a particular subject. So really, it means you're clever! Li: Oh really?! But why 'onions'? Rob: It is a strange term and some people say it comes from a man called S.G. Onions who made fake coins to help teach children about money. If they learnt about money they would know their onions. Li: I see. But I suppose now we just use it as a silly expression. Rob: We do. Like this... If you ever need someone to fix your computer, ask Bob, he really knows his onions! Look, you got full marks in the maths test – you really do know your onions. That tour guide really knew her onions, didn't she? Li: So knowing your onions means knowing a lot about something. Well that describes me very well then! Rob: Hmm. Now another way of saying it, is that you really know your stuff. Li: Stuff. You mean like this... When it comes to making cakes, my mum really knows her stuff. Rob: Well, knowing your onions or knowing your stuff, is very useful when you're doing a quiz like this. So Li, here's another question Li. Complete the name of this flavour of crisp... 'Cheese and something...?' Li: Oh, that's tricky... cheese and ham? Cheese and apple? I've got it! It's cheese and onion crisps! Rob: Brilliant Li. You really do know your onions. And now I might win a holiday. Li: That's great but who are you going to take with you? Rob: Probably my girlfriend. Li: Oh right. I didn't want to go with you anyway – you have got onion breath! Rob: Oh dear. Join us again soon for another programme about everyday English sayings. Li: Bye!

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Kaz: Hi. You're listening to The English We Speak. I'm Kaz and today I'm having dinner at Li's house. Li: Hi, I'm Li and I've prepared some chocolate mousse for dessert. Kaz: Oh thanks. I love chocolate mousse. Mmm, it's delicious. Li: Good! Anyway, what was I saying? Oh yes, I don't know if I want to stay in this house. I mean, Chris thinks it's haunted and that there are ghosts here! He says he can sense their presence... Kaz: Really? I can't sense anything. Li: Shhh... listen? Can you hear something? Kaz: No Li, I can't hear anything - just the wind outside. If you want my advice, you should take it with a pinch of salt. Li: OK, I will... Yuck! That's disgusting. Kaz: Li, what are you doing? Li: I just ate my chocolate mousse with a pinch of salt, as you suggested, and it's absolutely disgusting. Kaz: Li, I was talking about what Chris said about ghosts in your house. In English, if you take something with a pinch of salt, it means you don't completely believe it. Li: Really? What a weird expression. So if I take something with a pinch of salt, it means I doubt whether something is true. Kaz: Yes, and sometimes Chris does exaggerate, so you shouldn't always believe everything he says. Li: Let's hear some examples: Apparently they're going to sell the company and make everyone redundant. You should take it with a pinch of salt; it's only a rumour. The other day he told me he speaks 23 languages fluently. I take everything he says with a pinch of salt because I know he likes to exaggerate. Li: Ah, right. So when Chris told me there were spirits or ghosts in my house, I should take it with a pinch of salt. Maybe he's just making it up to scare me! Kaz: I'm sure he just said it as a joke. Do you want some more chocolate mousse - without a pinch of salt this time? Li: Good idea. Mmm, it does taste really nice without salt. (Sound of banging, creaking) Li: What was that? Kaz: It's probably the wind? (Ghost sounds - oooooo ooooooo) Li: It's not the wind. Someone's in the house! Look, there's someone coming into the room! Voice: Ooooo, Oooooooo, I'm a ghost! Kaz: What the...? Hang on a minute, I recognise that voice. Li: Chris, Chris? Is that you? Why are you covered in a white sheet? Chris: I'm a ghost that's come to haunt you... I heard you made some chocolate mousse, Li, so I came over to eat some... Ooooo... Li: You scared us! I really do have to take what you say and do with a pinch of salt. Chris: Mmm... delicious! All: Bye! Li: Unbelievable!

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Kaz: Hello, I'm Kaz. Yang Li: And I'm Yang Li. Hey Kaz, why are we listening to this rocket launch? Kaz: Well, it's dramatic, but there's another reason. I thought it could introduce today's expression. Yang Li: Tell me more. Kaz: The expression is 'It's not rocket science'. Yang Li: 'It's not rocket science', meaning? Kaz: Something that's not complicated or difficult to understand - 'it's not rocket science'. Yang Li: For example? Kaz: OK. Somebody can't get the television to work and asks you, "How do I switch this thing on?" You would say "It's not rocket science. Just press 'on' on the handset". Yang Li: So there's nothing complicated about it. You just press the 'on' switch and away you go. But is the expression 'it's not rocket science' only used for gadgets? Kaz: No, not at all, Li. In fact it's used for many situations that are just obvious... for example - why are we always short of money? Yang Li: Well, it's not rocket science Kaz - we don't get paid enough! Kaz: Brilliant Li. That's an excellent example. Yang Li: Yes, I like it too. But let's listen to some more examples: How do I cook this soup? Come on Rob, it's not rocket science, all you have to do is open the tin and heat it up. I can't understand why our company is in such a mess? It's not rocket science to figure that out - there are too many managers! Yang Li: OK Kaz, the phrase 'it's not rocket science' is used for situations that are obvious. But I get the feeling that the phrase 'it's not rocket science' is quite informal, right? Kaz: You're right Li. So please use with care! Yang Li: Absolutely. Kaz: It's usually used with the negative 'It's not rocket science'. Yang Li: Well, I'm sure of one thing Kaz. Kaz: What's that Li? Yang Li: Presenting this programme is not exactly rocket science - it's easy! Both: Bye! (Sound of a rocket being launched)

Jun 13th
Reply

sara k

Kaz: Hello, I'm Kaz. Yang Li: And I'm Yang Li. Hey Kaz, there is a storm raging outside - let's shut that door. (Door shuts) Yang Li: Ah that's better. Now I can ask you about your party last weekend. How did it go? Kaz: It went down a storm Li. Yang Li: Your party 'went down a storm.' You mean you cancelled it because of the weather? Because of high winds and rain? Or snow? Kaz: No, no, no Li. If something 'goes down a storm' it means it's massively successful and enjoyable - so my party went really well - it went down a storm. Yang Li: People loved it? Kaz: Exactly. People loved my party so I can say 'It went down a storm.' Yang Li: Your party went down a storm - it was incredible. Kaz: That's right. Yang Li: Well, Kaz, I gave a presentation yesterday. Kaz: Oh OK. How did it go? Yang Li: It went really well, everyone loved it, it went down a storm. Kaz: That's great Li. Yang Li: Yes, I'm delighted and I like today's expression. Let's listen to some more examples: You should have seen the new band last night. They went down a storm with the audience. My idea for more holidays went down a storm with my colleagues. I like the looks of this new toy. I'm sure it'll go down a storm with our customers. Yang Li: Kaz, you know, to me the word 'storm' has negative associations because storms are usually destructive. Kaz: I agree Li but in this case it's used in a positive sense. Yang Li: But it is informal, right? Kaz: Yes it is. Yang Li: So our listeners should use it with care. Kaz: That's right Li. So what do you think our listeners will think of today's expression? Yang Li: I'm sure it'll go down a storm! Both: Bye!

Jun 13th
Reply

marzie

Hi. please leave the transcripts of the podcasts

May 20th
Reply

Zohre Rezapoor

اجرا نمیشه....

May 18th
Reply

mohamad mahdi mortazavipour

Jiaying Hello and welcome to The English We Speak. I’m Jiaying… Neil …and I’m Neil. Jiaying Have you seen Rob today? He seems really sad. Neil Ahhh yes – he went to the shop, but sadly they had run out of biscuits… and then…. Jiaying Ahhh that’s why he’s sad – say no more! Neil That’s rude! I was going to tell you about what happened next – but then I won’t if you don’t want me to speak any more! Jiaying No, Neil – I said ‘say no more’ – which is an expression used when we understand what someone is trying to say and there is no need for any further explanation. Neil That makes sense – you know what I think would be a good idea? I could do with a coffee. Jiaying Say no more. I’ll put the kettle on while we listen to these examples. Examples Roger’s in a really bad mood? Say no more – I’ll stay out of his way. Thanks for telling me about the big meeting. Say no more - I’ll be there. When I told the decorator I wasn’t happy with the colour of the walls, he just said ‘say no more’ and repainted it. Jiaying You’re listening to The English We Speak from BBC Learning English, and we’re talking about the expression ‘say no more’. We use this expression to say we understand what someone is suggesting and there is no need for further explanation. Neil Yes. If we’re trying to tell a story or imply our opinion on it, we can say ‘say no more’ to show we understand their feelings towards it. For example – this coffee tastes a bit interesting. Jiaying Say no more – I’ll make a new one! Neil Ha! You totally understood that I thought the coffee was terrible. Jiaying I did – but now you really did explain what you were thinking! Ouch! Neil Sorry Jiaying – I really should have stopped speaking – sorry! Jiaying That’s OK! Bye, Neil! Neil Bye!

May 9th
Reply

Hani3am

it's meaning is i cant believe you.

May 1st
Reply

Ali moharrami

word file

Apr 21st
Reply

Eli Ma

need vpn

Mar 14th
Reply

Negin_as_diamond

cool

Mar 13th
Reply (5)

morafie

مثل شتر دیدی ندیدی فارسی

Mar 7th
Reply

Farzin ghasemi

William: Hello and welcome to The English We Speak. My name is William Kremer. Helen: And I'm Helen. William: I've got something for you, Helen. Burst of loud classical music (Beethoven's '5th Symphony') Helen: It's nice to have a bit of music William, but why... Burst of different classical music (Mendelssohn's 'Dance of the Clowns') William: What do you think... nice music, huh? Helen: Well, it's certainly dramatic! So are we having a special musical edition today, William? William: Well, yes we are Helen. The BBC Proms start this Friday, remember? Helen: Ah, of course. The BBC Proms is a huge classical music festival that the BBC sponsors. It's over 100 years old. William: Yes and every day for the next two months hundreds of music fans will queue to get their hands on a £5 ticket. Helen: Wow. Are you going to go? William: No, I hate queuing! But anyway, I thought we could have a music-themed programme. And our phrase this week relates to one instrument in particular... Trumpet music solo Helen: The trumpet? William: Yes, do you know what it means to say someone 'blows his own trumpet'? Helen: Yes. It means that someone is talking too much about his achievements, right? William: Exactly. Let's listen to an example. Woman: Who's going to be there tonight? Man: I think Angela and Mark and that guy Martin... Woman: Oh no, not Martin! He's such a bore. He's always blowing his own trumpet. Last time I saw him he went on and on about how he had been promoted twice in six weeks. Helen: So this is quite a negative phrase then? William: Yes, sometimes. But interestingly, it isn't always used in a negative way. Listen to this example. A woman is talking to her niece. Woman: I didn't know you'd come top in the class again! Why didn't you tell me? You really must start blowing your own trumpet a bit more! Helen: So in that clip, the woman was telling her niece she ought to blow her own trumpet more? William: Yes. And English people sometimes use this phrase because they are embarrassed to talk about their achievements. Listen to this clip: Man: How's it going at your work nowadays? Woman: Well, at the risk of blowing my own trumpet, it's going very well. In fact, I've just won an award! Helen: She said "At the risk of blowing my own trumpet". William: Yeah, so that's like saying "Excuse me while I talk about my achievements"! Helen: Well, I wonder whether we should blow our own trumpet a bit more. I mean here we are with a really popular website, bbclearningenglish.com... William: ...yeah, making lots of little programmes that are entertaining, fascinating, useful... Helen: …and best of all, it's all free! Brilliant, huh? William: Yeah, that's brilliant! But maybe we should stop blowing our own trumpet now! Shall we have some more of that nice music again to finish off? Helen: Oh yes! Bye! William: Bye!

Mar 3rd
Reply

Farzin ghasemi

Helen: Hello and welcome to The English We Speak. I'm Helen. William: Hi, I'm William. Today Hampton Court Palace Flower Show is opening. Music, birdsong Helen: Oh, Hampton Court Palace Flower Show – the world's largest flower show! I've seen it on the news before. If only I had a garden! William: Ah yes, you live in an apartment, don't you Helen? Helen: Yeah. So William, let me guess, today we are going to do a phrase relating to flowers and gardening? William: Exactly. Helen: So...? What's the phrase? William: Er... Well, how about... how about... er. No, it's gone. It's no good. I can't think of a phrase right now. Helen: Oh well. Let's just have a chat instead. I'm tired of learning new phrases anyway. William: OK. Well, how are you Helen? How are the kids? Helen: Oh they are both really well. My little boy eats too much chocolate though! William: Oh really? Well, you want to nip that in the bud. Helen: Eh? Nip it in the bud? William: Nip it in the bud. If you nip something in the bud, you stop it before it becomes a problem. Listen to this example from a business context: Man: The last few deliveries we've had from this company have all had broken parts in them. Woman: Well, we need to nip that in the bud. Tell them that unless their service improves, we're going to look for another supplier. Helen: So in that example, the man was complaining about poor service from a supplier. The woman wanted to nip it in the bud. William: That's right. She wanted to take steps to improve the service before it got even worse. Helen: So where does this phrase come from William – to nip something in the bud? Birdsong and music William: Well, it comes from gardening, actually. A bud is the part of a plant that becomes a flower, a leaf or stem. If you nip something in the bud, you cut the bud off the plant before it has time to grow. Helen: Oh. That's not very nice. William: Well, gardening is a tough game, Helen. You have to nip things in the bud sometimes. You also have to kill slugs and snails. Helen: Eugh! I'm glad I don't have a garden. William: Bye! Helen: Bye!

Feb 28th
Reply

tahere hasani

it is good

Feb 28th
Reply
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