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The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

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Ezra Klein brings you far-reaching conversations about hard problems, big ideas, illuminating theories, and cutting-edge research. Want to know how Stacey Abrams feels about identity politics? How Hasan Minhaj is reinventing political comedy? The plans behind Elizabeth Warren’s plans? How Michael Lewis reads minds? This is the podcast for you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
276 Episodes
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I’ve wanted to have Dave Eggers on the show for a while now. Eggers has not only written a vast range of books (a deeply ironic personal memoir, a heartwarming novel about a Sudanese refugee, a futuristic story about a tech dystopia) but he's also founded the national tutoring nonprofit 826 Valencia, started the literary magazine McSweeney’s, co-authored the screenplay of Where the Wild Things Are, and much more. I’m fascinated by people who are able to do a variety of wildly different things, all successfully. Dave Eggers is one of those people. So, we start this conversation by discussing Eggers’s life’s work, his recent book The Captain and the Glory, and Donald Trump. But then — somewhere around the halfway point — the conversation transforms into something I can only describe as, well, therapeutic. Eggers doesn’t own a smartphone or have wifi in his house, and hearing the way he talks about the internet, social media, and our relationship to them put me in a sort of quasi-meditation state that I can’t describe adequately with words.This one is a little strange, but it may just make your day. It certainly made mine.Book recommendations: The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton The House of Mirth by Edith WhartonIf you enjoyed this episode, you may like: You will love this conversation with Jaron Lanier, but I can’t describe itCal Newport on doing Deep Work and escaping social mediaMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineer - Cynthia GilLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
If you're anything like me, this episode will make you think about the way you shop, learn, eat, parent, and exercise in a whole new way.My guest today is Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, a professor of public policy at the University of Southern California whose most recent book The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class documents the rise of a new, unprecedented elite class in the United States. Previously, the elite classes differentiated themselves from the rest by purchasing expensive material goods like flashy clothes and expensive cars. But, for reasons we get into, today’s elite is different: We signify our class position by reading the New Yorker, acquiring elite college degrees, buying organic food, breastfeeding our children, and, of course, listening to podcasts like this one.These activities may seem completely innocent — perhaps even enlightened. Yet, as we discuss here, they simultaneously shore up inequality, erode social mobility, and create an ever-more stratified society — all without most of us even noticing. This is a conversation that implicates us all, and, for that very reason, it is well worth grappling with.Book recommendations: Just Kids by Patti Smith Art Worlds by Howard S. BeckerThe Goldfinch by Donna TarttIf you enjoyed this episode, you may also like: When meritocracy wins, everybody losesWork as identity, burnout as lifestyleWhat a smarter Trumpism would sound like My book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineer - Jeff GeldLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Andrew Marantz is a writer at the New Yorker who, for years, has been deeply immersed in the world of conservative trolls, alt-right social media personalities, and online conspiracy theorists. His most recent book Antisocial has been viewed as a brilliant ethnography of the bizarre universe that is the alt-right. But I’m interested in it for a different reason: Somehow, these folks have figured out how to manipulate the social media ecosystem that frames our political discourse. Thus, they represent an important window into understanding how that ecosystem functions, who it advantages, and where it dramatically falls short. We discuss:- Why Mark Zuckerberg’s defenses of Facebook so obviously fail- Where the conversation about “free speech” in America went completely off the rails- How alt-right personality Mike Cernovich cracked social media algorithms to influence the 2016 news cycle- What Marantz calls the “primary laws of social media mechanics” and how they can be manipulated to bring out the worst in human nature- Why conflict has become the primary way to garner attention and influence online while more constructive social interactions remain in obscurity- How a kid from a progressive, upper-middle-class family became one of the nation’s leading neo-Nazis- The role the social justice left plays in fomenting online extremismAnd much more.Book recommendations: Contingency, Irony and Solidarity by Richard Rorty The Captive Mind by Czesław MiłoszUncanny Valley by Anna WienerMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Due to a technical glitch this interview with Edward Norton did not find it’s way into most people’s feeds. If you were able to download the first one this is indeed the exact same interview, but if you missed it please give a listen and enjoy - we had a lot of fun with this one.You’ve heard of Edward Norton. He’s starred in critically acclaimed films like American History X, Fight Club, and Birdman, been nominated for multiple Academy Awards, and, most recently, wrote, directed, and starred in Motherless Brooklyn, a film about a detective with Tourette’s syndrome who ends up taking on the most corrupt and powerful forces in New York City politics.Motherless Brooklyn, as it happens, is one of my all-time favorite books.And so this conversation was an unexpected pleasure. In addition to a joint love of Motherless Brooklyn, Norton and I share an unusual number of interests: Meditation, the uncontrollable nature of the mind, the difficulty of solving problems by thinking about them, the psychology of power, media analytics, cultural ideas of heroism, thwarted masculinity in politics, Ralph Nader, and more.It’s rare that I think a conversation could’ve gone for hours more. But it’s true for this one.References:Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan LethemThis Could Be Our Future by Yancey StricklerCatching the Big Fish by David Lynch  *The world according to Ralph Nader* Book recommendations:Barbarian Days by William Finnegan Wind, Sand, and Stars by Antoine de Saint-ExupéryBuddhism without Beliefs by Stephen BatchelorIf you like this episode, check out:What Buddhism got right about the human brainYou will love this conversation with Jaron Lanier, but I can’t describe itMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineer - Jeff GeldLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Introducing Reset

Introducing Reset

2019-11-0800:42:56

Thanks for listening to Reset from Recode and the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episodes were Can A.I. Tech You To Write Better and Quantum Supremacy, WTF.If you enjoyed these episodes, subscribe to Reset for free on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app to get new episodes every week.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Michael Lind is a visiting professor at the University of Texas at Austin, the co-founder of the New America Foundation, and an important contributor to American Affairs, a journal originally created to imagine a more Trumpist conservatism.Lind is by no means a supporter of Trump. But, for decades now, he has been developing a coherent intellectual worldview around many of the same issues that Trump intuited, however crudely, during his campaign. He’s one of the intellectuals that the nationalist conservatives trying to imagine a Trumpism after Trump tell me they read most closely.There are three big pieces of Lind’s thought that I think help to illuminate this era. One is his idea of the “new class war,” which builds a deep cultural component into class identity and maps much better onto populist resentment. The next is his approach to China, which has long been skeptical of Washington’s optimistic consensus. And the third is his insistence that political conflicts — be they class wars or partisan ones — don’t end in victories, they end in “settlements.”References: "The New Class War" by Michael Lind"The Return of Geoeconomics" by Michael Lind"Classless Utopia versus Class Compromise" by Michael Lind"Donald Trump, the Perfect Populist" by Michael LindBook recommendations: The Machiavellian Defender’s of Freedom by James Burnham Foundation by Isaac AsimovThe Rise and Fall of the Great Powers by Paul KennedyMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Welcome to episode 2 of our climate cluster. The more I prepared for this series, the more I realize there was a big blue gap in my understanding of climate change.Oceans cover 70% of the earth, absorb 93% of the heat from the sun, and capture 30% of the carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Forty percent of the world’s population lives within 60 miles of the coast, and half a billion people rely on oceans as their primary food source. As go the oceans, so goes humanity.Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson is the founder of the Urban Ocean Lab and the Ocean Collectiv, she’s held positions at the NOAA and the EPA, and was named by Outside Magazine as the most influential marine biologist of our time. And she’s able to do something a lot of people aren’t: communicate not just the science of climate change from the ocean perspective, but the role oceans play in the human story.This is not a dry, complex disquisition on climate science. This is a vivid tour of the way oceans shape our lives, and the costs and consequences of reshaping them.Book Recommendations: Eat like a Fish by Bren Smith Water in Plain Sight by Judith D. SchwartzEmergent Strategy by adrienne maree brownMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineer - Ernie ErdatLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Welcome to the first episode of our climate cluster. This isn’t a series about whether “the science is real” on climate change. This is a series about what the science says — and what it means for our lives, our politics, and our future.I suspect I’m like a lot of people in that I accept that climate change is bad. What I struggle with is how bad. Is it an existential threat that eclipses all else? One of many serious problems politics must somehow address?I wanted to kick off the series with someone who knows the science cold. Kate Marvel is a research scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and a professor at Columbia University’s Department of Applied Physics and Mathematics. But Marvel isn’t just a leading climate scientist. She’s also unique in her focus on the stories we tell each other, and ourselves, about climate change, and how they end up structuring our decisions. We discuss:- How a climate model actually works- Why this is the good place- Why there is so much variation in climate scientists’ predictions about global temperature increases- Why global warming is only one piece of the much larger problem of climate change- Why a hotter planet is more conducive to natural disasters- The frightening differences between a world that experiences a 2°C temperature increase as opposed to a 5°C temperature increase- Whether the threat of climate change requires solutions that break the boundaries of conventional politics- The underlying stories that animate much of the climate debate- Whether the planet can sustain continued economic growth- What it means to “live morally” amid climate changeAnd much more...Book recommendations:Parable of the Sower by Octavia ButlerParable of the Talents by Octavia ButlerAnnihilation by Jeff VendermeerMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineer - Ernie ErdatLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“Neoliberalism” is one of the most confusing phrases in political discourse today. The term is often used to describe the market fundamentalism of thinkers like Milton Friedman and Frederich Hayek or politicians like Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. At the same time, critics often place more progressive figures like Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and even Elizabeth Warren under the neoliberal banner. This raises an important question: what the hell is neoliberalism?I decided to bring on two guests today to help us answer that question. Wendy Brown is a professor of political theory at UC Berkeley, author of Undoing the Demos and In the Ruins of Neoliberalism, and one of the foremost critics of neoliberalism, not only as a set of economic policies but a “governing rationality” that infects almost all aspects of our existence. Noah Smith is an economist, a columnist at Bloomberg, and is known for his robust defenses of some (though not all) neoliberal positions, which earned him the prestigious title of Chief Neoliberal Shill of 2018. We discuss:- The differences between neoliberal theory and “actually existing neoliberalism”- Neoliberalism as not only a set of economic policies but a form of “public reason” that influences our very conception of what it means to be human- How neoliberal thought came to dominate almost every aspect of our lives- Whether neoliberalism is an inherently anti-democratic project- The relationship between neoliberal economic policies and traditional morality- The differences between New Deal liberalism and Obama-era neoliberalism- Whether a growth-driven economic model is compatible with our planet's ecological limitsBook recommendations: How Asia Works by Joe StudwellLaw Without Future by Jack JacksonDemocracy in Chains by Nancy McLeanMy book is available for pre-order! You can find it at www.EzraKlein.com.Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comYou can subscribe to Ezra's new podcast Impeachment, explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app. Credits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineer - Topher RouthLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Hey EK Show listeners! Something different today. The first episode of my new podcast: Impeachment, Explained.This was the week of confessions. Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney admitted to a Trump administration quid quo pro with Ukraine, with cameras rolling. EU Ambassador Gordon Sondland confirmed that President Trump made Rudy Giuliani the hinge of America’s Ukraine policy. And then the administration announced that the location for the upcoming G7 summit: Trump’s own resort in Doral, Florida. We break down the three stories that mattered most in impeachment this week.And then we dig into the four words that will shape the entire impeachment fight: “High Crimes and Misdemeanors.” What did they mean when they were added to the Constitution? How have they been interpreted through American history? And do Trump’s acts qualify?Listen to the first episode here, and subscribe to Impeachment, Explained, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app to get stay updated on this story every week.References:"Indispensable Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution’s Impeachment Power" by Gene Healy"The case for normalizing impeachment" by Ezra KleinWant to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.comCredits:Producer and Editor - Jeff GeldResearcher - Roge KarmaEngineers - Malachi Broadus & Jeremey DalmasTheme music composed by Jon NatchezSpecial thanks to Liz NelsonLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (55)

Grant Robbins

This was a great podcast.

Nov 19th
Reply

Olga Musayev

Isn't Ezra Klein 35? That makes him technically a millennial, but definitely not a Boomer, regardless.

Nov 16th
Reply

Sharon McKinnon

Couldn't listen anymore. Every second word out if the guest was like.

Nov 13th
Reply

Otto Bruun IV

Fantastic show

Oct 21st
Reply

Sharon McKinnon

This is the most relatable podcast I've ever heard. Thank you for talking about this.

Oct 14th
Reply

Nicolas Brylle

One of the better conversations in a while. Thank you!

Oct 8th
Reply

Greg Clayson

blah. no thanks.

Sep 27th
Reply

Mihir Kulkarni

Thank you for this amazing podcast! I adore Randall and it was awesome hearing him open up!

Sep 23rd
Reply

James R

the Voyager interstellar.... dead link

Sep 16th
Reply

Saramenti

1:03:38 interesting question.

Sep 12th
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A J Hackett

agree, she just doesn't finish a sentence before chasing off after another thought

Aug 29th
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NLuc

I find it really hard to follow her. the train of thought isn't structured and she talks in long monologues without resolving the question. Ezra does this too, of course, but he is much better structuring his throughts. one point, she mentions the wealth of congress. well, rich people being congresspeople's is probably always going to happen, and should happen! we want good lawyers and effective people in these positions. that isn't to not criticize the institution, but claiming income/wealth is fundamental is wrong headed.

Aug 27th
Reply (1)

Gene

I'm surprised there's no mention of community owned enterprises. If workers can elect their own representatives into the board of the company, the board essentially acts as a quasi parliament that can dictate or overthrow it's executive (CEO).

Aug 19th
Reply

Drew Misner

This is another great interview, but one thing is really lacking, even after listening to it twice. Chetty talks at length about neighborhood but does not define what it is! Are we talking about West Village vs East Village? Manhattan vs Staten Island? Buffalo vs NYC? Ezra mentions the Bay Area - is this considered a neighborhood? Given the talk of integration/diversity - are we talking about non urban vs urban? Chetty used IRS data according to Ezra, so maybe it's by zip code? Without knowing this it makes it extremely difficult to visualize the dynamics discussed in the podcast. Also, it sounds like much of what is discussed is manifest as neighborhood effects or that neighborhood is simply a proxy for things like education, role models, support, etc that could be the target of policy independent of location.

Aug 19th
Reply (1)

Keith Trainor

This one is a fascinating topic, but a tough listen. Maybe there is a better spokesperson out there for Medicare For All, but perhaps there is not. This guest didn't seem to hear 50% of the questions he was asked.

Aug 15th
Reply (1)

Tom Garundazoo

I think they are miss using 'ambivalent' what I think they really mean is 'uncertainty' or 'nuance' which are totally different

Aug 13th
Reply

Justin M.J. Harris

such a good episode very easy to connect the points he was making to what's going on today

Jul 19th
Reply (1)

Vedant Mhatre

She sounds like Nancy Pelosi

Jul 17th
Reply

Nicolas Brylle

Talk about being a snowflake hahaha. And the hypocrisy...

Jul 9th
Reply

Andrew Leoni

its interesting to hear ezra work on his promos

Jul 8th
Reply
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