DiscoverThe Ezra Klein Show
The Ezra Klein Show
Claim Ownership

The Ezra Klein Show

Author: Vox

Subscribed: 18,207Played: 225,082
Share

Description

Ezra Klein brings you far-reaching conversations about hard problems, big ideas, illuminating theories, and cutting-edge research. Want to know how Mark Zuckerberg intends to govern Facebook? What Barack Obama regrets in Obamacare? The dangers Yuval Harari sees in our future? What Michael Pollan learned on psychedelics? The lessons Bryan Stevenson learned freeing the wrongly convicted on death row? The way N.K. Jemisin imagines new worlds? This is the podcast for you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
213 Episodes
Reverse
How social democrats won Europe — then lost it
Democratic socialism is on the rise in the United States, but it’s been a dominant force for far longer in Europe. Ask Bernie Sanders to define his ideology and he doesn’t start naming political theorists; he points across the Atlantic. “Go to countries like Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden,” he says.The populist right is on the rise in the United States too, and that’s also been a powerful force for far longer in Europe. The mix of economic populism and resentful nationalism that Donald Trump ran on in 2016 and Tucker Carlson offers up nightly on Fox News might be unusual here, but it’s commonplace there.Understanding Europe’s politics, then, is of particular help right now for understanding our own. Sheri Berman is a political scientist at Barnard College, as well as the author of multiple books on European social democracy. We discussed what separates social democrats from progressives and neoliberals, how the populist right co-opted the European left, why social democrats lost ground in the ’90s to Blairite technocrats, whether multi-party political systems work better than our own, and why identity issues tend to unite the right and split the left. Berman is masterful in clearly synthesizing politics across countries and time periods, so there’s a lot to learn in this one.Book recommendations:Nation Building: Why Some Countries Come Together While Others Fall Apartby Andreas WimmerThe Meaning of Race: Race, History, and Culture in Western Societyby Kenan MalikMulticulturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognitionby Charles Taylor and Amy Gutmann
An ex-libertarian’s quest to rebuild the center right
Nothing would do more to repair American politics than for the center right to regain power in the Republican coalition. But before that can happen, the center right needs to exist — it needs a theory of both policy and politics, one that would allow it to organize a new right if the Trumpist coalition ever collapses.The Niskanen Center is a new Washington think tank started by refugees from the libertarian right who’ve decided to do exactly that. Will Wilkinson, Niskanen’s director of research, is one of them.A former Ayn Rand devotee, philosophy grad student, and Cato Institute staffer, Wilkinson has come to believe, among other things, that the freest economies feature the biggest welfare states, that unchecked capitalism and unchecked democracy pose similar threats, and that polarization is a function of density and psychology. This is a podcast about those ideas, but also about whether a center right like this is actually possible, or whether it’s a doomed project that misunderstands conservative psychology from the outset.Sometimes conversations go in very interesting directions you didn’t expect. This is one of those. I don’t want to spoil too much of it, but we could’ve, and perhaps should’ve, talked for twice as long. Enjoy!Book recommendations:Open Versus Closed: Personality, Identity, and the Politics of Redistributionby Christopher D. Johnston, Howard Lavine, and Christopher M. FedericoThe Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequalityby Brink Lindsey and Steven TelesThe New Geography of Jobsby Enrico Moretti
Meet the policy architect behind the Green New Deal
Last month, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey introduced a Green New Deal resolution, outlining a bold effort to decarbonize the US economy and forestall the worst effects of climate change. Ever since, it has been the talk of the town in Washington, drawing praise and criticism from all quarters.But most critics completely misunderstood the resolution. It is not a policy document. It is a set of goals and principles meant to guide the development of policy.The work of fleshing out the policy details is largely in the hands of Rhiana Gunn-Wright, working out of a think tank called New Consensus. Gunn-Wright is busy consulting a broad slate of experts, with the goal of assembling a policy framework that will be ready to go when/if Democrats take power in 2021.Vox staff writer David Roberts sat down with Gunn-Wright to chat about how she’s approaching this monumental task, why the Green New Deal includes social and economic goals (like full employment) alongside environmental goals, and what she makes of the criticism that the plan is “unrealistic.”Book recommendations:The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths by Mariana Mazzucato Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time by Ira KatznelsonWe are conducting an audience survey to better serve you. It takes no more than five minutes, and it really helps out the show. Please take our survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3X6WMNF
American politics after Christianity, with Ross Douthat
I’m Vox’s interviews writer, Sean Illing. Lately, I’ve been interested in the following question: Is the decline of institutionalized Christianity making our politics worse? The answer may be yes, but I’m not convinced it’s for the reasons many people suppose.Ross Douthat is a conservative columnist for the New York Times who has been one of the more thoughtful writers on this topic. Douthat believes that Christianity’s collapse has not only helped destroy civic bonds in America, it’s also amplified our tribalism problem. As more and more Americans lose any connection to a shared religious or moral worldview, he argues, they’re increasingly drawn to transgressive movements like the alt-right or to the vulgar politics of Donald Trump.My sense is that Douthat’s view of Christianity is somewhat nostalgic and overlooks the racial hierarchy that undergirded previous eras of American politics. But I’m open to his point of view, and admit I might be mistaken. In this conversation, we discuss the forces behind the decline of Christianity, how it’s fueling tribal politics, and why he thinks the left should really be worried about the post-Christian right.Book recommendations:Religion: If There Is No God-- : On God, the Devil, Sin, and Other Worries of the So-Called Philosophy of Religionby Leszek KolakowskiBlack Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca WestThe Great Divorce by C. S. Lewis We are conducting an audience survey to better serve you. It takes no more than five minutes, and it really helps out the show. Please take our survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3X6WMNF
loading
Comments (14)

Tenman X

Hmm... Justice and fairness will follow when the Left learn to soothe the socio-cultural anxieties of the white overclass. Such sophistry, Professor Kaufmann! Bye, Felicia!

Apr 18th
Reply

chaitanya kumar

This was such a painful listen. Not sure how ezra managed to continue the interview - Eric doesn't see the massive cultural and political imbalances between races, doesn't agree that structural racism exist and is fully behind a white history month! His diagnosis is elementary and his solutions more so. Sigh.

Apr 17th
Reply

Tara O'Donnell

This was excellent! It is this kind of strategy for the Republican party that even a liberal Democrat could get behind. If I were a lawmaker, I would reach out a hand to and work with this kind of Republican. We would have a vastly better world with more of this forward and deeply thoughtful thinking on the right. Thank you!

Apr 14th
Reply

Jesse Chan

sounds like audio issues around 5:40?

Apr 2nd
Reply

Jesse Chan

Jesse Chan also around 13:20

Apr 2nd
Reply

Otto Bruun IV

Excellent podcast! Buttigieg is a very impressive guy. Congratulations on the kiddo.

Apr 1st
Reply

Thaís Bara Di Vita

Deeyah shows how courage and intelligence is made better by sensibility. I was very impressed and touched by this interview, i cant thank ezra enough for bringing it to me.

Mar 15th
Reply

J. Kupperman

So insightful. Thank you for this interview

Mar 12th
Reply

Donna McLocklin Cermak

Congratulations Ezra!!

Feb 26th
Reply

Natalie Schreiber

All discussions on M4A that don't include specifically that: while taxes may be raised, 1)there will be no more out of pocket deductibles, 2)there are no more co-pays, 3)no more in-network vs out of network bs red tape, & 4)there's a general peace of mind that comes with not having your medical coverage tied to a specific job, is an incomplete discussion and often down right misleading.

Feb 7th
Reply

fajar ahmad setiawan

Wow. Your book recommendations are exceptionally old and perhaps, outdated. It doesn't mean these books are useless, it's just becoming niche literature now when there are many more innovative and revolutionary thinkers like Zizek and Dawkins.

Feb 7th
Reply

Jim Lane

these conversation keep going back to Will Store's ideas on the self and individualism

Feb 4th
Reply

Natalie Schreiber

I agree with everything except the Hillary Clinton bit. While I am willing to acknowledge the truth of misogyny directed at her to a point, it is also extremely important to recognize that from a principaled policy standpoint, her ideology is neoliberal and she is a corporatist. period. That is why I voted for the other woman in the race Jill Stein. So, misogyny does not explain the whole picture. Clinton represents the new aristocracy that modern day patriots oppose. Kamala Harris will have the same problem in 2020. That's why I currently support Marianne Williamson 2020.

Feb 2nd
Reply

Howard H

https://youtu.be/KSl24zyuJAQ

Jan 30th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store