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The FRONTLINE Dispatch

Author: FRONTLINE PBS, WGBH

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An award-winning, original, investigative series made by the team behind the acclaimed PBS documentary show, FRONTLINE. From the long and deadly arm of 9/11, to a police shooting in West Virginia with a startling twist, to what life is really like for children living in a Kenyan refugee camp, each episode follows a different reporter through an investigation that sometimes is years in the making. The FRONTLINE Dispatch – because some stories are meant to be heard.

Produced at FRONTLINE’s headquarters at WGBH in Boston and powered by PRX.

The FRONTLINE Dispatch is made possible by the Abrams Foundation Journalism Initiative.
20 Episodes
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte makes his own rules. His war on drugs has led to the deaths of thousands of alleged drug users and dealers. His violent rhetoric and rape jokes have shocked people around the world. Yet he’s hugely popular. Reporter Aurora Almendral delves into what made him the leader he is today. Her investigation starts in his hometown in the Philippines.
Terry Allen was 23 when he was arrested for an alleged sexual assault. Although he was never convicted of the crime, Allen was sent to an Illinois prison, where he has remained for nearly four decades with no release date.Across the country, hundreds of people are incarcerated without convictions for the alleged acts that landed them in prison. Reporter Max Green tells the story of one such man.This episode was produced in collaboration with WBEZ Chicago.
Millions of Americans can’t afford rent and only a quarter of those who need government help get it. What happens to everyone else? For many, it means they live in squalor. But figuring out who’s responsible is harder than you think. In this episode of The FRONTLINE Dispatch, NPR correspondent Laura Sullivan heads to Dallas where the city, low income residents and a prominent landlord sometimes described as a slumlord, become the moving pieces in a century-and-a-half old problem.This episode was done in collaboration with NPR.This episode is a rebroadcast and originally aired on October 12, 2017.
The Boy in the Caravan

The Boy in the Caravan

2019-02-0700:31:002

In a collaboration between PRI’s The World and The FRONTLINE Dispatch, we follow a 15-year-old boy from El Salvador who joined the large migrant caravan last fall and is determined to enter the United States. But his quest is anything but certain. Meanwhile, a loved one is desperately waiting for him on the other side of the border. Reporter Monica Campbell follows his story.
In Appalachia, more than 2,000 coal miners are suffering from advanced black lung disease, caused by toxic dust in the mines and part of an epidemic federal regulators failed to prevent. Reporter Howard Berkes spoke with dozens of sick and dying miners with varying stages of the disease about how it has irrevocably changed their lives. For Berkes, the story is a culmination of nearly four decades of reporting on rural America. Today, he shares some of his most intimate interviews with them.Find the full FRONTLINE and NPR investigative documentary here: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/coals-deadly-dust/Produced by NPR’s Investigation Unit.
Update: Living With Murder

Update: Living With Murder

2019-01-1000:15:263

Part Three of the Living With Murder Series.In December 2017, after serving 30 years of his life sentence, Kempis Songster left Graterford Prison on lifetime parole.A lot has happened since then. He now lives in Philadelphia. He’s working, married and became a father.  One year after Reporter/Producer Samantha Broun and Kempis Songster stopped recording their conversations for the Living with Murder series, they return with this series’ update on what Kempis’ life looks like today. This story was produced in collaboration with the public radio website Transom.org.
At 15, after committing a brutal murder, Kempis Songster was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. But now he has a chance to be free, thanks to a series of recent Supreme Court rulings that found the sentences of thousands of inmates who, like Songster, committed their crimes as juveniles, to be unconstitutional.This is Part Two of his story.This episode was a collaboration with Transom.org.
At 15, after committing a brutal murder, Kempis Songster was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. But now he has a chance to be free, thanks to a series of recent Supreme Court rulings that found the sentences of thousands of inmates who, like Songster, committed their crimes as juveniles, to be unconstitutional.This episode produced in collaboration with Transom.org.
KIDS' SPECIAL: Muzamil's Day

KIDS' SPECIAL: Muzamil's Day

2018-12-2700:24:002

In this special episode for kids, FRONTLINE follows a day in the life of Muzamil, a 12-year-old Somali boy growing up Kenya’s Dadaab Refugee Camp. Producer Bianca Giaever and Reporter Roopa Gogineni bring him questions from American kids about what it’s like growing up in a refugee camp. Are there dentists? A fire department? What is your dreamland? Muzamil takes us through his daily life, answering questions from American kids along the way.This episode was produced in partnership with Firelight Media. You can see pictures of Dadaab, Muzamil, and his friends here: https://to.pbs.org/2CAnQwN
The Weight of Dust

The Weight of Dust

2018-12-1300:53:007

Scott Gaines was a first responder on 9/11. When he retired a couple months later, he thought he’d escaped the aftermath unscathed. This time on The FRONTLINE Dispatch, a story about the lasting impacts of 9/11 – told by his daughter, reporter Amy Gaines.This story was produced by Michelle Mizner and Sophie McKibben. 
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Comments (6)

Michael Ronan

mormon?

May 1st
Reply

Andy Laurenzi

why not look into code regulations. some towns have no code requirements and seem to do fine. is there any flexilbility on code based on income. codes are necessary but largely inflexible and bound by bureaucrats in bureaucracy

Dec 31st
Reply

Hudithi

Full of forgery and twisting facts. Sad music in background with a voice full of falsifications of reality are not helping the Yemenis ppl case.

Nov 3rd
Reply

WatchDawg

it is the end of the story, at least the end of listening to your waffle.

Jun 23rd
Reply

WatchDawg

You folks seem to try and sound like there is a fair balance to each story. It's like you are liars.

Jun 23rd
Reply

Dolores Millay

Loved the in-depth investigation into child marriage in the U.S. Eager for future episodes.

Sep 15th
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