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THE FOOD SEEN

Author: Heritage Radio Network

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THE FOOD SEEN explores the intersections of food, art & design, and how chefs and artists alike are amalgamating those ideas, using food as their muse & medium across a multitude of media. Host, Michael Harlan Turkell, talks with fellow photographers, food stylists, restaurateurs, industrial and interior designers; all the players that make the world so visually delicious, that want to eat with your eyes.
398 Episodes
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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Justin Rosenberg founded honeygrow with a wok and dream. Seven years after his first fully customizable stir-fry restaurant, Rosenberg has outposts in multiple major metropolitan hubs. But with dozens of locations in their home base of Philly, to Rosenberg’s hometown of New York City, how does honeygrow keep, er, growing? With fresh noodles, naturally raised meats, farmers market vegetables, all tossed in spicy garlic, sesame garlic, sweet soy five spice, and red coconut curry that is! And with passion, grit and fine-dining mentality.It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Nicholas Coleman found his love of olive oil by way of music. A serendipitous stop in Arezzo, Italy, home to Guido Monaco, the inventor of modern musical notation (you know, “Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Ti Do”), Coleman found his coda during olive tree harvest. Since, he’s been devoted to promoting and peddling the freshest olive oils around the world. The first self-proclaimed oleologist (olive oil expert), he’s sought, and sold, the gold standards in field, from Italy, to South Africa, and even Chile. Co-founder of Grove and Vine, a subscription based membership to custom extra virgin olive oils sourced around the world, Coleman still has the music in him, often carrying around his Bansuri flute (because his Carl Thompson olive wood left bass is too heavy), as if he’s the Pied Piper of Pressed Olives.
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Lazarus Lynch, may have started Son of a Southern Chef as a living relic to his late father’s fish fry restaurant in Queens, but it somehow morphed into a fabulous modern soul food bible. The product of Alabama roots and a Guyanese mom, Lynch is an amalgam of his upbringing, yet a character all his own! A graduate of New York City’s Food and Finance High School, Lynch took his culinary comprehension to create an awareness that reaches far past food; into fashion, music, the queer community. That said, his a strong presence on screen (Food Network’s Comfort Nation) and social media delivers a common message: #makeitgravy, which is truly all-encompassing, like Lynch himself.It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Charles Bieler bleeds rosé. His father Philippe founded Chateau Routas in Provence, France, but it wasn’t until the late 1990s that Charles found his place in the wine world. Behind the wheel of a pink Cadillac convertible, Charles drove across America spreading the doctrine of drinking rosé, and as part of this dogma, decided to not pit Old World versus New World. Rather, Charles cultivated rosé’s unique relationship to all, regions and wine drinkers alike, and thus Bieler Family Wines was born. This year, Charles went on the 20th anniversary ride of his original #RoséRoadTrip, and though his pink caddy found its demise in Detroit, Charles still sees the world through rosé colored glasses.It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Calgary-born Matt Abergel had to wait for the short window of warm weather to barbecue in his native Canada, but wherever there was charcoal burning, there was chicken to grill. Whether kebabs out of a split in half oil drum in Israel with his aunts, or triple yellow chicken in Hong Kong as his yakitori joint, Yardbird, Abergel has always strived to serve the best parts of the bird. In his book, “Chicken and Charcoal”, there are exploding diagrams of skewered breasts, thighs, wings and tsukune (meatballs), all which can be enjoyed sitting in the most comfortable chairs (specifically designed for the restaurant); so, sit back, relax, and fire up your grills!
Episode 394: Chloe's Fruit

Episode 394: Chloe's Fruit

2019-06-1100:40:06

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, motherhood may have been mother of invention for Chloe Epstein, a lifelong froyo fanatic, and former Assistant District Attorney. It was Epstein’s sweet tooth that lead her to conceive Chloe’s Fruit, a frozen treat company focusing on real fruit blended with nothing more than water and cane sugar. Her signature pops are in over 13,000 stores around the nation, with core flavors like banana, mango, and strawberry that aren’t just for kids anymore. Enjoy a cold-pressed coffee collaboration with La Colombe, or a dairy-free dark chocolate, and see what it means to chill out with Chloe’s Fruit!It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, the grandson of a preacher man, Chadwick Boyd was raised on Southern fare: fried chicken biscuits, coconut custards, lemon meringue pie … It was in his blood to host, holding his first dinner party at 10 years old, cooking Steak Diane, twice-baked potatoes and peas for mama out of the Betty Crocker’s Cookbook for Boys and Girls. Since then, Boyd’s had lobster for New Year’s Eve dinner on the set of Dead Poet’s Society, cooked alongside Dolly Parton, been seen on the big screen in over 15,000 movie screens around country for his series “Reel Food”, and now works as a food & lifestyle brand strategist. That said, he’s still all about those biscuits; hosting an International Biscuit Festival in Knoxville, TN for over 20K attendees, coordinating a traveling “Biscuit Time” event series with chef and television personality Carla Hall, and continues to use food as a medium for storytelling throughout his life.
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Stacy Adimando, Saveur magazine’s EIC, began and her pursuit of the most perfect antipasti as a way to find fullness in family, but during a solo trip to the most southwestern tip of Italy’s boot, she met her grandfather’s cousins, their kids, grandkids … and bonded over plates after plates of so-called appetizers. These dishes inspired her book, “Piatti: Plates and Platters for Sharing, Inspired by Italy”; whether we’re talking about her Grandma Stella’s Broccolini Frittata, or Nanny’s Veal Braciolini (taught to Adimando by her 100-year-old Great-Uncle Joe), these family recipes are the best parts of her Italian-American upbringing, and is proud to bring them to your families’ tables too.
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, David Keck, an opera singer turned sommelier, has an affinity for hospitality and honky tonk. At his flagship Houston haunt, Goodnight Charlie’s (part of his restaurant group: Goodnight Hospitality), Keck’s created a variety show of sorts, complete with live music, dancing, an unparalleled wine cellar, and a long list of tacos loaded with chochinita pibil and hot chicken. But how did his love of the Loire find home in the Lone Star State?
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, South Korean born Eunjo “Jo” Park, immigrated to Philly to become a chef. She hasn’t been “running with scissors” her ever since. Park is cool, contemplative, intentional with her every move, which is likely why David Chang so strongly courted her for the opening of Momofuku Kāwi, his new Hudson Yard’s restaurant. Park’s also worked at Daniel, Le Bec Fin and Per Se, but that’s beside the point; her prowess came studying temple cuisine’s restraint. While “kāwi” means “scissors” in Korean, a utensil that’s emphatically utilitarian, it’s Park’s beauty for the banal that’s made her food so earthly.
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