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The Guardian's Audio Long Reads
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The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

Author: The Guardian

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The Audio Long Reads podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more
488 Episodes
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After years of outsourcing, many essential staff work for the NHS without receiving its benefits. In one London hospital, the fight is on for a better deal. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
The end of tourism?

The end of tourism?

2020-07-1041:272

The pandemic has devastated global tourism, and many will say ‘good riddance’ to overcrowded cities and rubbish-strewn natural wonders. Is there any way to reinvent an industry that does so much damage? By Christopher de Bellaigue. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Amid the mayhem that has turned parts of Karachi into no-go zones, reporters risk their lives to make sense of a crime wave that is virtually an insurgency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
After losing four pregnancies, Jennie Agg set out to unravel the science of miscarriage. Then, a few months in, she found out she was pregnant again – just as the coronavirus pandemic hit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
In the northern region of La Rioja, one medieval town has suffered a particularly deadly outbreak. And in such a tight-knit community, suspicion and recrimination can spread as fast as the virus. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: CBeebies isn’t just a channel, it’s a culture – and as a new parent you have little choice but to surrender to it. By Sophie Elmhirst. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Hong Kong used to be seen as cautious, pragmatic and materialistic. But in the past year, an increasingly bold protest movement has transformed the city. Now, as Beijing tightens its grip, how much longer can the movement survive? By Tania Branigan and Lily Kuo. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
The power of crowds

The power of crowds

2020-06-2635:194

Even before the pandemic, mass gatherings were under threat from draconian laws and corporate seizure of public space. Yet history shows that the crowd always finds a way to return. By Dan Hancox. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Myles Jackman is on a mission to change Britain’s obscenity laws. For him, it’s more than a job – it’s a moral calling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Many have attempted to claim that ‘things are better here’ for black people than in the US. This ignores both Europe’s colonial past and its own racist present. By Gary Younge. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
The man in the iron lung

The man in the iron lung

2020-06-1937:112

When he was six, Paul Alexander contracted polio and was paralysed for life. Today he is 74, and one of the last people in the world still using an iron lung. But after surviving one deadly outbreak, he did not expect to find himself threatened by another. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This time we revisit Felicity Lawrence’s 2016 report on the exploitation of migrant labour in the UK: In the bleak flatlands of East Anglia, workers are controlled by criminal gangs, and some are forced to commit crimes to pay off their debts. This is what happens when cheap labour is our only priority. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
For decades, anti-government and white supremacist groups have been attempting to recruit police officers – and the authorities themselves aren’t even certain about the scale of the problem. By Maddy Crowell and Sylvia Varnham O’Regan. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Our environmental vandalism has made urgent the question of ethical responsibilities across decades and centuries. By Astra Taylor. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
For the next few weeks we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s pick: In January 2014, an endangered plant was taken from Kew Gardens, only a few years after scientists saved it from extinction. Sam Knight investigates what happens when plant obsession turns criminal. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Cholera has largely been beaten in the west, but it still kills tens of thousands of people in poorer countries every year. As we search for a cure for coronavirus, we have to make sure it will be available to everyone, not just to those in wealthy nations. By Neil Singh. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Amid this unfolding disaster, we have seen countless acts of kindness and solidarity. It’s this spirit of generosity that will help guide us out of this crisis and into a better future. By Rebecca Solnit. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
For the next couple of months we will be raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: In 2015, after 12 years living in the US, Gary Younge was preparing to depart, amid another eruption of the country’s racial tensions. As we hear in Gary’s new introduction - which was recorded in January 2020 - half a decade later, this piece remains as grimly relevant as ever.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
With millions of children shut out of schools worldwide, tech evangelists claim now is the time for AI education. But as the technology’s power grows, so too do the dangers that come with it. By Alex Beard. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Not long after Antarctica recorded some its highest-ever temperatures, I joined a group of scientists studying how human activity is transforming the continent. It wasn’t what we saw that was most astonishing – but what we heard. By Jonathan Watts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
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Comments (58)

Lizzie Sherwood-Smith

Absolutely loved this, particularly about the screen posed to be providing a new level of safety for clients to disclose.

May 23rd
Reply

Gabriel

Thank you again for this article. Also, as a fan of the long reads, it's nice to hear a new voice reading the articles. The voice of the orator is gentle and clear. However, without wanting to be at all offensive, and I want to state that I do really love the Irish accent, it is often quite confusing that he intonates the ends of each sentence upward, as one would at a question in other English accents. And it makes listening to the articles a bit more of a challenge.

Apr 25th
Reply

Robert Mol

This time, I had to stop listening. Not because of the story - it's the voice. It sounds as if it's a computer voice. Couldn't listen to it, I'm very sorry.

Apr 17th
Reply

Nonker

Who does the author work for? Could be Monsanto, or some coalition of agribusinesses nervous that profits associated with the chemicals and proprietary genetics used in industrial farming practices might decline. Much information goes mysteriously unmentioned here. While the growth in population means we will need more food, how it is grown is important. The piece pretends the choice is between industrial agriculture and “rewilding” and does not mention the significant dangers of industrial agricultural practices. Neonicotinoids are associated with the decline in honeybees, and without them, farming is in trouble. Similarly, no-till practices have major flood-protecting properties that will be more and more essential during climate change. Conventional farming erodes soil. What good is big ag if we doesn’t have enough soil to farm? And the article conveniently does not mention that the lower yields that happen when farmers switch to no-till and cover cropping are similar to those of industrial farming after a transition period of a two to three years - a transition that will require government support, but will be well worth it given the benefits of preserving healthy soil, reducing erosion and flooding and pollution, and keeping our valuable pollinators alive and healthy.

Apr 2nd
Reply

W South

ugh ..not somewhere I'm sure I want to explore

Mar 10th
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Dianne

What a brilliant story about a wonderful couple. This must be one of my favourite podcasts I've heard on castbox to date. A refreshing escape from the harsh media spotlight of late.

Feb 28th
Reply

James

Fantastic article/episode. Very special people.

Jan 31st
Reply

Omid Shy

Interesting read

Jan 12th
Reply

Ali Smith

,,.,

Dec 31st
Reply

Lucie Rymer

this is stupid and sexist and not engaging

Dec 5th
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Sean Cody

I read this to test myself for any latent anti Islam prejudice. The author appears to suffer from an equal but opposite set of prejudices making for a long yet pointless read. Why is it so hard to hear both sides of the argument without obvious bias toward a personal conviction.

Oct 30th
Reply

Willem van Gogh

Do you remember George Bush bringing "democracy" to the middle east and the big waver on a warship stating "mission accomplished"??

Oct 19th
Reply

Richard Fisher

it is articles like this why I don't pay subscription to the Guardian. whilst I absolutely agree that there is this Islamic takeover trope in the Far Right, this author completely ignores the reality that for some muslims it is true! the Far Right didn't invent this idea of takeover by breeding and immigration, I've head imams telling their flock to do just this! Why can't you make the fair criticism of the FR and also make the fair criticism of that which some call 'Islamism'? you like to pretend that these imams and their followers don't exist, when you lose through omission like this all you do is add to the distrust and conspiracy theories of manipulation. it is backfiring, you help the FR with this islamophile apologetics.

Oct 13th
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Subhajit Das

The irony is I really want to share these words over Twitter.

Sep 19th
Reply

Magnus Wold

More an attack on neo-liberalism than mindfulness .. Misleading title.

Aug 22nd
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Mariejose

this well researched article is why I love The Guardian.

Jul 13th
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Matt Burke

weak at best

Jul 10th
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Mikey Scallywags

Why the fuck does she pronounce cocaine that way? Kahcane

Jul 1st
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Ralph OFUYO

Interesting listen

Jun 16th
Reply

James Duke-Evans

I enjoy guardian long reads, but it sounds like the natural gaps between sentences have been chopped out. Sounds weird, off-putting.

Apr 17th
Reply
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