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The Guardian's Audio Long Reads
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The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

Author: The Guardian

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The Audio Long Reads podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more
562 Episodes
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In 1971, an Old Firm derby at Ibrox ended with the death of 66 fans as they celebrated a late goal. John Hodgman survived the terrifying crush and, 50 years on, asks how Rangers avoided taking responsibility. By John Hodgman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory. By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
The race is on to find a steady source of lithium, a key component in rechargeable electric car batteries. But while the EU focuses on emissions, the lithium gold rush threatens environmental damage on an industrial scale. By Oliver Balch.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
How a trans woman found the surgery that could restore her sense of self. By Jenny Kleeman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: The oh-so-Instagrammable food movement has been thoroughly debunked – but it shows no signs of going away. The real question is why we were so desperate to believe it. By Bee Wilson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
The faithful chronicler of the aristocracy for 250 years is reinventing itself as an engine for social mobility, offering courses in manners and getting your foot in the door. Is this just snobbery rebranded? By Aida Edemariam. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Merry Christmas! We hope you’re having a good one. We are taking a short break but will be back on 4th January 2021. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: Fifa belongs to a select group of titles familiar to people who have no interest in gaming – or even real football. What’s the secret of its success? By Simon Parkin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
A drone sighting caused the airport to close for two days in 2018, but despite a lengthy police investigation, no culprit was ever found. So what exactly did people see in the Sussex sky? By Samira Shackle. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Strangely eventless, yet swelling with high drama, The Archers is the longest-running series in the world. But has this rural soap been teaching Middle England about itself, or inventing it from scratch? By Charlotte Higgins. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2016: All of our efforts to be more productive backfire – and only make us feel even busier and more stressed. By Oliver Burkeman. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Jake Haendel spent months trapped in his body, silent and unmoving but fully conscious. Most people never emerge from ‘locked-in syndrome’, but as a doctor told him, everything about his case is bizarre by Josh Wilbur. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: The ability of statistics to accurately represent the world is declining. In its wake, a new age of big data controlled by private companies is taking over – and putting democracy in peril. By William Davies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
When the Colombian army defeated the Farc guerrillas, ending decades of conflict, General Mario Montoya was hailed a national hero. But then it was revealed that thousands of ‘insurgents’ executed by the army were in fact innocent men. By Mariana Palau. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Acts of state violence, and repeated official denials, drove some Northern Irish Catholics to armed resistance. But not everyone in west Belfast supported the IRA’s methods. By Ian Cobain. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: The social network had a grand plan to connect millions of Indians to the internet. Here’s how it all went wrong. By Rahul Bhatia. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
After being offered a prestigious international literary residency, Nkiacha Atemnkeng was excited for his first visit to the US – until he turned up at the embassy for his interview. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
In the 1930s, thousands of men and women around the world enlisted to fight fascism in Spain. Many survivors went on to play a key role in the fight against the Nazis – but, in some cases, later became powerful servants of brutal regimes. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: For 25 years, invoking this vague and ever-shifting nemesis has been a favourite tactic of the right – and Donald Trump’s victory is its greatest triumph. By Moira Weigel. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
Many of the perpetrators have been jailed for their crimes. Now a number of survivors and their families claim that officials at Celtic knew about the sexual abuse and did nothing. By Henry McDonald. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
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Comments (67)

Sepehr Soleyman Fallah

If only the quality was as before....

Nov 9th
Reply

little boxes

Oh the irony. this episode was interrupted by an advert... for Asda.

Sep 26th
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Top Clean

Thanks for the good "article" / episode on how we treat pets and animals. i like this in the wild.!. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AicEBRYFTeI https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SzIb10D_5Rw

Sep 19th
Reply (1)

Bruno Vieira Pereira

Fortunately, as a result of this pandemic, more and more people are recognising the vital role which those who work in ICU play and also, the importance of their job in order to save as many lives as possible.

Aug 18th
Reply (1)

Top Clean

I think the kids in cages deserve more attention, care and there parents. In the long-term view they can be like any normal person with care, if not they can be damaged for life, with a lifetime of suffering. https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/07/11/written-testimony-kids-cages-inhumane-treatment-border

Aug 7th
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Top Clean

During his first State of the Union address, President Donald Trump vowed to keep the Guantanamo Bay detention center open – a move that starkly contrasts the plans of his predecessor. ... Since its opening 16 years ago, the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba has imprisoned nearly 800 people. It has been decried by critics on both sides of the aisle who say the prisoners – alleged terrorists and people with suspected ties to terrorist organizations – suffer from human rights violations within its walls. https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/02/13/guantanamos-ugly-taint-us-diplomacy Definition of gestapo: a secret-police organization employing underhanded and terrorist methods against persons suspected of disloyalty. See, e.g., the Trump/Barr activities in Poland - sorry in Portland. ... And the slavery is still here in the U.S. disguise as the profitable state, federal and private Prison's, where prisoners they work for less so they make outside free working people being a obsolete workforces. ... And yes perhaps one reason detainees are not being released is that over 70 percent of detainees are held in private, for-profit facilities⁠. Two of the largest of those, GEO Group and CoreCivic (Corrections Corporation of America). Despite their failure to provide safe conditions for detainees, the GEO earned $2.3 billion in 2018, mostly from U.S. government contracts, which is more than any other ICE contractor. AmeriKKKa and Canada have the most people incarceration in the world. https://allthatsinteresting.com/private-prisons-us-stats ... We see that Profit is the main game here. Then ask yourself how, during a global pandemic, in the worst economy since the Great Depression, with 45.5 million Americans filing for unemployment, the total net worth of U.S. billionaires has climbed from $2.9 trillion to $3.5 trillion. And a Trillion is freaking BIG.!. https://www.thecalculatorsite.com/images/articles/20170628-trillion-dollars-in 1 million seconds equal 11 and 1/2 days. 1 billion seconds equal 31 and 3/4 years. 1 trillion seconds equal 31,710 years. GOP is Greedy Oppressive Predators! But thanks for a good episode and podcast. 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

Aug 7th
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Joanna Linley

What a powerful and emotional story. How brave of Jenny to share what she's been through. Wishing you all the very best for the rest of your pregnancy.

Aug 3rd
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Lizzie Sherwood-Smith

Absolutely loved this, particularly about the screen posed to be providing a new level of safety for clients to disclose.

May 23rd
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Gabriel

Thank you again for this article. Also, as a fan of the long reads, it's nice to hear a new voice reading the articles. The voice of the orator is gentle and clear. However, without wanting to be at all offensive, and I want to state that I do really love the Irish accent, it is often quite confusing that he intonates the ends of each sentence upward, as one would at a question in other English accents. And it makes listening to the articles a bit more of a challenge.

Apr 25th
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Robert Mol

This time, I had to stop listening. Not because of the story - it's the voice. It sounds as if it's a computer voice. Couldn't listen to it, I'm very sorry.

Apr 17th
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Nonker

Who does the author work for? Could be Monsanto, or some coalition of agribusinesses nervous that profits associated with the chemicals and proprietary genetics used in industrial farming practices might decline. Much information goes mysteriously unmentioned here. While the growth in population means we will need more food, how it is grown is important. The piece pretends the choice is between industrial agriculture and “rewilding” and does not mention the significant dangers of industrial agricultural practices. Neonicotinoids are associated with the decline in honeybees, and without them, farming is in trouble. Similarly, no-till practices have major flood-protecting properties that will be more and more essential during climate change. Conventional farming erodes soil. What good is big ag if we doesn’t have enough soil to farm? And the article conveniently does not mention that the lower yields that happen when farmers switch to no-till and cover cropping are similar to those of industrial farming after a transition period of a two to three years - a transition that will require government support, but will be well worth it given the benefits of preserving healthy soil, reducing erosion and flooding and pollution, and keeping our valuable pollinators alive and healthy.

Apr 2nd
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W South

ugh ..not somewhere I'm sure I want to explore

Mar 10th
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Dianne

What a brilliant story about a wonderful couple. This must be one of my favourite podcasts I've heard on castbox to date. A refreshing escape from the harsh media spotlight of late.

Feb 28th
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James

Fantastic article/episode. Very special people.

Jan 31st
Reply

Omid Shy

Interesting read

Jan 12th
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Ali Smith

,,.,

Dec 31st
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Lucie Rymer

this is stupid and sexist and not engaging

Dec 5th
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Sean Cody

I read this to test myself for any latent anti Islam prejudice. The author appears to suffer from an equal but opposite set of prejudices making for a long yet pointless read. Why is it so hard to hear both sides of the argument without obvious bias toward a personal conviction.

Oct 30th
Reply

Willem van Gogh

Do you remember George Bush bringing "democracy" to the middle east and the big waver on a warship stating "mission accomplished"??

Oct 19th
Reply

Richard Fisher

it is articles like this why I don't pay subscription to the Guardian. whilst I absolutely agree that there is this Islamic takeover trope in the Far Right, this author completely ignores the reality that for some muslims it is true! the Far Right didn't invent this idea of takeover by breeding and immigration, I've head imams telling their flock to do just this! Why can't you make the fair criticism of the FR and also make the fair criticism of that which some call 'Islamism'? you like to pretend that these imams and their followers don't exist, when you lose through omission like this all you do is add to the distrust and conspiracy theories of manipulation. it is backfiring, you help the FR with this islamophile apologetics.

Oct 13th
Reply
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