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Author: The Economist

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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

248 Episodes
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Badly run housing markets are linked to broader ills, from financial crises to the rise of populism. The first problem? The conviction that home ownership is an unambiguously good thing. While China clamps down on most religions, it encourages others; we meet the followers of a tenth-century sea goddess. And the decline of drinking a century after Prohibition began. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After Russia’s president proposed vast constitutional change, the whole government resigned. It seems to be another convoluted power-grab by Vladimir Putin—and it seems likely to work. Our correspondent finds that the tired stereotypes European Union countries have about their neighbours are pervasive even at the heart of the European integration. And the surprising and nefarious world of sand-smuggling.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Negotiators will sign a “phase one” pact today—but the trickiest issues remain unresolved, and plenty of tariffs will stay in place. Will the deal repair trading relations? As more young people head online, “cyberbullying” is on the rise, too. But why are some kids bullying themselves on social media? And why quirky Las Vegas weddings are on the wane. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The race for the Democratic nomination looks much like it did a year ago—but previous contests prove that once voting starts, momentum can reshuffle the pack. Iran has been roiling with protests following the accidental downing of an airliner; what should Iranians and the wider world expect now? And we examine how Bogotá’s once-adored public-transport system went so wrong. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
China has been getting more aggressive in its claims over the island, but voters have made it clear just how much they favour democracy. The relentless slipping of interest rates around the world isn’t recent: new research suggests it’s been going on since the Middle Ages. And why the language of scientific papers disfavours female authors. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Evacuations are expanding as fast as the flames, and worse may yet be to come. We visit the fiery extremes that climate change is making more likely. At a museum dedicated to disgust, our correspondent tries some repugnant stuff, learning that the reaction is about far more than food. And why Japan’s new, surname-first rule reveals a big shift in attitudes. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
He won a landslide victory campaigning on it, but like French presidents before him Emmanuel Macron is struggling to push through his grand pension reform; we ask why. The belief in guardian spirits in Myanmar is being cracked down on by increasingly intolerant monks. And the Canadian town of Asbestos considers a name-change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Attacks on bases that house American troops seem a dramatic retaliation to the killing of Iranian commander Qassem Suleimani—yet both sides seem to be tuning their tactics toward de-escalation. After nearly a year without one, Spain has a government. But amid fragmented politics, it may not get much done. And how darts is moving from British-pub pastime to American prime time. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After chaotic scenes in the National Assembly, it seems the country’s legislature has two leaders. Has Juan Guaidó’s chance at regime change run out of steam? Allegations against Harvey Weinstein sparked the #MeToo movement; as he stands trial in New York we examine how the movement is progressing. And unpicking the weird theories for Sudan’s nasty traffic. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Killing Iran’s top military commander does not seem likely to further America’s aims for the region. What should America and its allies expect now? Biologists have long struggled to explain why homosexual behaviour is so widespread in nature, but a new theory simply asks: why not? And the global comeback of dubbing in foreign films. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
It is increasingly clear that putting less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will not be enough to combat climate change; we take a look at the effort to actively remove the stuff from the air. Our correspondent takes a ride on Chicago’s Red Line, whose length represents a shocking level of inequality. And why a push to go organic in Turkey isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
No longer content just to assemble devices, Chinese firms want to design them and the infrastructure around them—and in some sectors they look set to succeed. Our correspondent visits indigenous communities along the icy sliver of water between Russia and America. And why North Korean students get illegal tutoring. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Death sentences are occasionally overturned in America; we meet a private detective responsible for saving many of those lives. We scour our foreign department taking nominations for The Economist’s country of the year. And our correspondent joins a shipment of Congolese beer for its long river journey from brewery to bars. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Lies and politics have always come as a pair, but the untruths keep getting bigger and more frequent; our correspondent digs into why. We speak with an adventurer who fought off the murderous boredom of a whole Antarctic winter with little more than books. And, the benefits and risks of home genetic-testing kits. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Next year, China’s median age will surpass America’s, but with just a quarter the median income; the government is nervous that China will get old before it gets rich. This weekend’s elections in Uzbekistan are another sign of astonishing change in the country—but plenty of political reform is still needed. And a sidelong glance at the tradition of the boss’s end-of-year memo. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Hindu nationalist government’s latest move pointedly excludes Muslims from immigration reform. Protesters reckon that is an attack on the country’s cherished secularism. Tuberculosis is still among the world’s biggest killers; we look at emerging new tools to fight an old disease. And a deep dive on the sex lives of eels. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
America’s impeachment battle falls along unhelpfully partisan lines—but the process has other shortcomings. We take some lessons from how the rest of the world does it. Cuba has long run an official two-currency economy; now, the once-banned American dollar is establishing itself as a third. And another take on American partisanship: our analysis shows intriguing divides in the country’s music tastes. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Now that the prime minister has a thumping parliamentary majority, Brexit is assured—but on what terms? And what other legislative shake-ups are in the works? President Donald Trump has relied heavily on financial sanctions, often in place of old-fashioned diplomacy. We ask whether that is an effective avenue of foreign policy. And an attempt to peek into Asia’s illegal tiger farms. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Again, the annual COP conference ran long and ended with disappointment. Why can’t countries agree on what so clearly must be done? One big contributor to the changing climate is meat-eating, and China looks ever more carnivorous. And a new, push-button system to land planes whose pilots are incapacitated. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
A thumping win for Boris Johnson’s Tory party is more complex than it seems; the returns cast a light on changes bubbling under the surface of the country’s politics. A renewed push for land restitution in Kenya is making life hard for foreign firms. And the hardcore safety training that Chinese students think they need before heading to the West. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Comments (59)

Mike Andre

what do china want to do Taiwan and Hong kong

Jan 14th
Reply

Jugjit Kairo

A good episode.

Jan 2nd
Reply

Yahya Jama

Intersting episode!

Dec 26th
Reply

Kunal

The Jammu and Kashmir division was not "against Muslims"/"anti-Muslim". What are you even basing that on?

Dec 19th
Reply

TruthSeeker

Typical anti Indian and anti Hindu rubbish from you. You really should do more research. The laws are provide refuge to minorities who are being terribly persecuted in the neighbouring Muslim majority countries

Dec 19th
Reply

Mahmud Gadauji

Lebanese are extremely fun.

Nov 10th
Reply

shekhu verma

Totally biased, not properly researched, host doesnt have the understanding of the issue of how India has been suffering the pakistani terrorism for past 70 yrs and how kashmiri pandits were butchered in 90s. Article 370 abrogation noe give equal rights to every kashmiri and the internet ban is to save people from terrorists attacks and that too have been relaxed. And stop calling this as hindu nationalist govt as indians from every sect voted this party and wanted this measure to be taken in kashmir.

Oct 16th
Reply (2)

Ryan Chynces

nobel prize interviewee was unlistenable

Oct 10th
Reply

TruthSeeker

Unsurprisingly the episode does not discuss how non-Muslims minorities were treated in Kashmir when the insurgency commenced and how Hindus were exiled from the place they had called home for many generations.

Oct 9th
Reply

Kunal

I really dislike the correspondent speaking for the emotions/views of all/most Indians. State facts, cite sources, don't just make idle claims like the people want to show the Muslims who's strong or whatnot 😒 Really disappointed by this irresponsibility with which you're representing Indian communities.

Oct 9th
Reply

Kunal

Hindu nationalism has nothing to do with this issue 🙄 That is a whole different can of worms. This decision is not about Hindus or Muslims, it's about the government taking steps to assert that Jammu and Kashmir is part of India, giving the central government more power to make decisions concerning the state and bringing it into the same system of governance which is present in other parts of the country.

Oct 9th
Reply

TruthSeeker

Typical anti Hindu and Indian sentiment from the Economist. Do you refer to the US or UK govt as Christian nationalist?

Oct 9th
Reply

Sofia Romero

Dear american citizens don't worry about Peru, there will be election soon and the corrupted congress has been adjourned, we peruvians are glad

Oct 4th
Reply

Ralph OFUYO

Great quote regarding planet status on how it's fine and the people are f#$%@

Sep 22nd
Reply

Zhenhui Lyu

Another good episode of China threat theory! Trump can force any western company to cooperare with his military movement and now you believe what google says? Hahah

Sep 19th
Reply

Anil Shah

very fascinating discussed the current on going events.

Sep 13th
Reply

Zhenhui Lyu

Why dont u report the Brexist protect and internal economic problems more?

Sep 7th
Reply

Zhenhui Lyu

You didn't show the whole truth~the mosque was dismantled in Ningxia because it didn't get the certificate of construction approval and land usage approval. The cosmetic is just a small part of the problem. If you dont have the certificate at the very beginning, it will be normal to see the building disappear.

Sep 7th
Reply

Lewis Short

Caribbean islands and cruise impacts :they are dumping treated waste. Would the correspondent prefer dumping untreated waste?

Aug 26th
Reply (1)

Zhenhui Lyu

Why did u only report what punishment Cathay took but not what they did putting the passengers in danger?

Aug 25th
Reply
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