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The Intelligence

Author: The Economist

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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

 Episodes
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A massive, rolling, national strike begins today, in protest against proposed reforms of the sprawling pension system. But details of the changes haven’t even been published yet. Our correspondent visits the conflict-ravaged Darfur region, and sees a historic opportunity for peace. And a look at how best to let entrepreneurial immigrants get back in business. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The House Judiciary Committee will now take up the inquiry into President Donald Trump. But will any of it matter to uninterested voters? The probe into the mysterious death of an investigative journalist is now haunting Malta’s halls of power. And a look back on the life of a beloved athlete who never quite won cycling’s biggest prize. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey.  For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
It will be all smiles at the NATO summit today in London--but many of them will be forced. Behind the scenes, the alliance’s leaders are arguing about what its purpose should be. We also look at the disputed data behind the idea that inequality has been rising inexorably in recent years. And how a novel way to reduce cow and sheep burps could help in the fight against climate change. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Islamic militant who killed two people in London last week was supposedly being monitored by the authorities. That revelation has prompted a fierce debate about what went wrong. We take a look at the state of the global AIDS epidemic. And as their country goes to wrack and ruin, Venezuelans have been turning to video games, but not for the reasons you might think. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Mexico’s president, is wildly popular, in part because of his determination to wipe out corruption. But is his crusade against graft everything it’s cracked up to be?  We also look at the debate around randomised control trials, a popular but controversial tool in economics. In Congo, caterpillars are considered a delicacy. We explain why they deserve to be the next superfood. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Donald Trump used to lionise generals, but this week he had a falling out with the top brass. Are the armed forces becoming as politicised as America’s other institutions? We also take a look at the emergence of a new narco-state in West Africa, Guinea-Bissau. And Silicon Valley has been trying to shed a reputation for sexism, but many of its products remain ill-suited to women. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The UN has just released its annual report on how well the fight to slow climate change is going. It finds that efforts to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions are going from bad to worse. We also look at a surprising new lease on life for China’s regional dialects. And while people debate about the merits of Uber, one thing is clear -- it drives people to drink -- or so new research suggests. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York, has announced he is running for president. But he is late to join the race and not very popular with Democratic primary voters. We also look at TikTok, a wildly successful video-sharing app, that some see as a threat to security in the Western world. And much of Switzerland is up in arms--about the reliability of the country’s coffee supply. Want to weigh in on our podcasts? Please fill out our survey at economist.com/podsurvey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After almost six months of protests and street battles, Hong Kongers have had a chance to vote in local elections. They sent a clear message of support to those agitating for greater democracy. We look at how the impeachment hearings in Washington are undermining the fight against corruption in Eastern Europe. And deep below Jerusalem, a high-tech cemetery is under construction. Would you like to weigh in on our podcasts? Complete our podcast survey at economist.com/podsurvey For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After years of investigations, Israel’s prime minister has been indicted. A fraught legal case will complicate the already messy business of cobbling together a government. We examine the work of a pioneering sociologist to understand the causes and consequences of eviction in America. And Leonardo da Vinci’s vineyard has been faithfully recreated, and his wine is enjoying its own renaissance.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After petrol subsidies were slashed, protests of surprising ferocity have flared up across the country—and neither the government nor the demonstrators seem to be backing down. The illicit trade in rhinoceros horn threatens the animals’ survival, but scientists have come up with a convincing fake that could collapse the market. And the surprisingly subtle choices to balance meat-eating and environmentalism. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The American administration’s shifting position on Israeli settlements in the West Bank will have little immediate effect—but may end up sharply crimping hopes for a Palestinian state. The first debate ahead of Britain’s general election didn’t leave much room for the two main candidates to get past canned talking points. And how high-end gin is displacing the rot-gut variety in India.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The early vision for a borderless, unregulated internet has not panned out as its pioneers hoped. How to handle the “splinternet”? Doug Jones is Alabama’s first Democratic senator in a quarter of a century; in his moderate ways our correspondent finds broader lessons for the Democratic Party. And air pollution is a threat the world over—most of all to the well-being of children.Additional audio courtesy of Department of RecordsFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Democrats have a hard task as the hearings’ public stage proceeds: not uncovering new evidence, but building a robust public case for impeachment. The online-grocery business is tough—but that isn’t stopping e-commerce players big and small from trying to crack it. And it’s getting harder for artists to hang around on the album charts; new talent is coming in, and heading out, ever faster. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After multiple suicide bombings in April, much campaigning has been about security. Will Sri Lankans vote tomorrow for the authoritarian-but-effective candidate, or the more untested peacemaker? We examine the growing nostalgia for Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted as Egypt’s president as part of the Arab Spring. And a trawl through historical records shows how long it took for William Shakespeare to reach real fame.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
There is widespread terror in the largely Francophone country’s English-speaking region. Both hardline separatists and the army target civilians with shocking brutality. In a Central Asian valley, a tangle of borders and exclaves that stretch back to Soviet times is making travel difficult—and sometimes deadly. And an experiment in Estonia to punish lead-footed drivers not with a fine, but with a time-out.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Molotov cocktails are flying and live rounds have been fired. Once-peaceful pro-democracy demonstrations are transforming into violent confrontations—and neither side seems willing to back down. The agricultural revolution that has swept much of the world has still not reached much of Africa; we look into the seeds of the problem. And why Colombia has a growing difficulty with a druglord’s hippos.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Trump administration has long wanted to scrap the “Dreamers” scheme, which allowed illegal immigrants who came as youths to stay in America. The question is whether the programme’s founding was legal. An emissions debate has infuriated Dutch farmers, and the debacle may threaten Holland’s long history of calm negotiation. And we ask why Disney wants to enter the cut-throat business of video-on-demand. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After weeks of protests following a disputed election, Evo Morales has stood down. Who is in charge, and how can the country escape its gridlock? On a visit to a military hospital our correspondent wonders why Americans seem so disengaged from their veterans. And the campaign to clear Bangladeshi streets of a beloved mode of transport. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
This weekend marks three decades since the wall fell, yet stark divides remain between East and West. We revisit that moment of hope that remains unfulfilled. Ethiopia’s Somali state was until recently the country’s most repressive; a visit to one of its prisons reveals a tremendous transformation for the better. And China’s effort to boost its national football team: naturalising foreign talents. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Comments (53)

Mahmud Gadauji

Lebanese are extremely fun.

Nov 10th
Reply

shekhu verma

Totally biased, not properly researched, host doesnt have the understanding of the issue of how India has been suffering the pakistani terrorism for past 70 yrs and how kashmiri pandits were butchered in 90s. Article 370 abrogation noe give equal rights to every kashmiri and the internet ban is to save people from terrorists attacks and that too have been relaxed. And stop calling this as hindu nationalist govt as indians from every sect voted this party and wanted this measure to be taken in kashmir.

Oct 16th
Reply (2)

Ryan Chynces

nobel prize interviewee was unlistenable

Oct 10th
Reply

TruthSeeker

Unsurprisingly the episode does not discuss how non-Muslims minorities were treated in Kashmir when the insurgency commenced and how Hindus were exiled from the place they had called home for many generations.

Oct 9th
Reply

Kunal Mathela

I really dislike the correspondent speaking for the emotions/views of all/most Indians. State facts, cite sources, don't just make idle claims like the people want to show the Muslims who's strong or whatnot 😒 Really disappointed by this irresponsibility with which you're representing Indian communities.

Oct 9th
Reply

Kunal Mathela

Hindu nationalism has nothing to do with this issue 🙄 That is a whole different can of worms. This decision is not about Hindus or Muslims, it's about the government taking steps to assert that Jammu and Kashmir is part of India, giving the central government more power to make decisions concerning the state and bringing it into the same system of governance which is present in other parts of the country.

Oct 9th
Reply

TruthSeeker

Typical anti Hindu and Indian sentiment from the Economist. Do you refer to the US or UK govt as Christian nationalist?

Oct 9th
Reply

Sofia Romero

Dear american citizens don't worry about Peru, there will be election soon and the corrupted congress has been adjourned, we peruvians are glad

Oct 4th
Reply

Ralph OFUYO

Great quote regarding planet status on how it's fine and the people are f#$%@

Sep 22nd
Reply

Zhenhui Lyu

Another good episode of China threat theory! Trump can force any western company to cooperare with his military movement and now you believe what google says? Hahah

Sep 19th
Reply

Anil Shah

very fascinating discussed the current on going events.

Sep 13th
Reply

Zhenhui Lyu

Why dont u report the Brexist protect and internal economic problems more?

Sep 7th
Reply

Zhenhui Lyu

You didn't show the whole truth~the mosque was dismantled in Ningxia because it didn't get the certificate of construction approval and land usage approval. The cosmetic is just a small part of the problem. If you dont have the certificate at the very beginning, it will be normal to see the building disappear.

Sep 7th
Reply

Lewis Short

Caribbean islands and cruise impacts :they are dumping treated waste. Would the correspondent prefer dumping untreated waste?

Aug 26th
Reply (1)

Zhenhui Lyu

Why did u only report what punishment Cathay took but not what they did putting the passengers in danger?

Aug 25th
Reply

Long Nguyen

another smear piece on Baltimore that places its woes on the populace and not the corrupt leadership and systems that led to the widespread poverty that afflicts the city. go listen to the 99% invisible episode on Baltimore

Aug 24th
Reply

Ibrahim Khader

Claiming that STC took over Aden just because UAE pulled out leaving power vaccum is misleading. UAE withdrawal has became obvious that it was part of a plan to push royal gov out of Aden.

Aug 14th
Reply

Neil Painter

. ,

Aug 12th
Reply

Neil Painter

,

Aug 12th
Reply

Neil Painter

9

Aug 12th
Reply
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