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Do you avoid sending prospective clients to your interior design website? Is it outdated with little copy? Does your website bring in any leads? If your website isn’t working for you, you’ve got a problem that Katie O’Brien can help you fix. Katie O’Brien is a brand and website designer specializing in elevated branding and fuss-free websites for interior designers. In this episode of The Wingnut Social podcast, Katie shares the type of copy to use, the right way to direct a prospective client to your contact form, and how to know when it’s time to revamp your website. Check it out! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [2:47] Wingnut Academy and Wingnut Webinars! [4:06] Mini News Sesh: Instagram prioritizing original content [7:56] Learn all about website designer Katie O’Brien [10:34] Why “If I build it, they will come..” is the wrong mentality [14:32] How to get ideal clients from your website [17:20] What type of copy to avoid—and what to embrace [18:47] How to answer the budget question on your website [25:35] The proper amount of copy to have on each page [27:12] Why your portfolio page still needs copy to tell a story [29:10] 5 signs that an interior designer has outgrown their website [33:02] How to direct your client’s steps on your website [35:32] Strategic testimonials can propel customers toward you [36:40] How to make lead magnets valuable to your clients [38:13] The What Up Wingnut Round! [42:04] Blooper Reel! Connect with Katie O’Brien Katie’s Website Connect on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned Building a StoryBrand by Donald Miller Business Made Simple with Donald Miller Why “If you build it, they will come..” is the wrong mentality Is your website getting traffic? Are you getting traffic but it’s not converting? Or are you not getting traffic at all? Kate notes that many factors that can impact this. But the first question she usually asks is, “Are you doing anything to bring traffic to your website?” Your website should be where your social media, media appearances, new inquiries, DMs—everything should be directed to. Once there, your website needs to strategically guide visitors to take a desired action.  If someone is looking to increase traffic, the answer is SEO. Katie’s biggest recommendation is to add regular, relevant, and consistent content to your website. You must make sure it’s SEO optimized and then share it everywhere. People don’t understand that ongoing SEO is necessary. It means blogging (and updating blogs), writing metadata, adding photos, building your portfolio, link-building—and so much more—consistently.  How to get ideal clients to connect with you Katie says to look at your website copy. What are you saying? Is it strategically speaking to your ideal client? Who is your ideal client? Many people don’t have their ideal client nailed down and it’s a mistake. You need to get specific about your ideal client—who are they? What are their pain points? How are you helping them with that? Does your website content speak to that person? You need to direct them to the next step. The next step is usually to complete a contact form or book a discovery call. All of your calls to action should work toward that goal. Teach them who you are, qualify them, and give them information about you to direct their steps. Think about the end result first. How does every page work toward that? Keep listening to hear how Katie suggests structuring pages to drive visitors to your call to action. 5 signs it’s time to revamp your interior design website Kate shares 5 signs when you KNOW it’s time to hire a pro: Your business is running almost entirely on referrals: While referral business is positive, it’s also a red flag. It means your website isn’t generating leads for you. If it isn’t, something’s wrong.  You are getting leads—but they’re the wrong leads: Consider adding qualifiers to your contact form to combat this issue. Is something on your website (like pricing language) missing?  Your business has evolved: If your website hasn’t evolved with your business, it needs to be updated. Your website needs to reflect all of the changes your business has made.  You avoid sending people to your website: If you’re embarrassed to direct people to your website, that’s a clear sign that your website is outdated (or you hate it).  You’ve been thinking about rebranding for a while. If you’ve been eying a website you love for a while or are gathering inspiration, take the next step. Find a season in your business where it’s a good time to revamp your website. If it’s time to take the next step, connect with Katie! Until then, she shares a wealth of great ideas to brush up your website in this episode.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
How do you attract the perfect interior design client? How do you decide what type of client will be the best fit? After 30 years in high-end commercial and residential design, Pamela Durkin now helps other designers create a business they love by teaching them how to attract their ideal clients. In this episode of the Wingnut Social podcast, she shares how to design your perfect client, how to leverage your network for referrals, and how to “shock and awe” potential clients so they become actual clients.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [2:07] Wingnut Webinars and Wingnut Academy Updates [4:10] Mini News Sesh: NEW Instagram features being released [9:11] Learn more about Pamela Durkin [12:35] How to find your perfect client [17:11] Pamela’s tips for new interior designers [21:23] How niching down impacts your bottom line [27:58] How to leverage your network  [30:26] Pamela’s process of auditioning clients [35:10] Pamela’s “Shock and Awe” box [41:41] The What Up Wingnut Round! [45:05] How to connect with Pamela Durkin [50:42] Blooper Reel! Connect with Pamela Durkin Pamela’s website Connect with Pamela on Instagram Read Pamela’s book: Elevate! Resources & People Mentioned Wingnut Webinars Get Wingnut Academy Updates Follow us on Instagram and you just might win a scholarship to our Instagram for Designers courses! Get FREE shipping on your first order from Article The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks Sell the Way You Buy by David Priemer How to narrow down your perfect client Designers are scared to leave money on the table, so many don’t narrow down their focus and choose a niche for their design business. But you need to. Pamela shares that you should start the process by taking the best things about past clients that you’ve worked with and molding them into a persona.  What motivations did they have? What was their personality like? What work have you done that’s been profitable?  How much do you enjoy doing that type of project? These things create a goal for the type of client you’re trying to attract. Pamela is from NJ and realized that when she did her best work, it was with people who made decisions quickly. Executives are the best types of clients for her. They make thousands of decisions every day, they make them quickly, and they hire professionals. They appreciated her personality and they were on the same page. Knowing this allowed Pamela to create connections quickly. You want people to say, “I feel like I know you.”  What do you do if you’re new to the business? How do you choose considerate people to work with? How does narrowing your focus impact your bottom line? Listen to learn more! Pamela’s process: auditioning clients It may sound odd at first glance—but it’s genius. Pamela auditions her clients. She starts by having a 15-minute phone conversation with them (nine out of ten times it’s a referral). She asks them to tell her about the project. The goal is to get a feel for their personality and their style—not their budget.  Why does that matter so much? Because interior designers are in the most intimate parts of people’s homes. They need to build rapport and foster open communication. Pamela will turn down a job if she doesn’t think it will be a good fit. Most people appreciate that.  Pamela will also ask for the project address and look at photos of the home to talk more intelligently about what they want to do. This will also help her gauge the value of the property and if it’s within her scope of work. If everything lines up, Pamela will schedule an in-person meeting. Her next step is genius.  Pamela’s “Shock and Awe” box Before the meeting, she sends potential clients a “Shock and awe” box. The box will include a gift, a drink and snack, and a handwritten note that says, “Enjoy this snack while learning more about us.” She’ll include a few back issues of her monthly newsletter so they can get to know her. She shares her professional profile, an FAQ sheet, her project process, and more.  The key is to send this before they’ve hired her. Not only does it make an impact, but the box shows how organized you are, shows how you’re going to take care of them, and shares your communication style. You have to remember that people are buying the experience. Once you get to the in-person meeting, they’ve learned so much about you that they only ask questions about the things they actually have questions about. It leads to a more productive and intimate conversation.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, YouTube, or TuneIn  
10 years ago, Robyn was a youth minister who couldn’t make ends meet. So she took $100 and started buying things at garage sales and reselling them on Craigslist, eBay, and Amazon.  In three years, she turned that $100 into a million-dollar business: Marketplace Blueprint. Robyn started an agency six years ago to help businesses—everything from companies that are pre-launch to publicly-traded companies—be successful on Amazon. Robyn is now one of the foremost leaders on the topic of selling products on Amazon. Her business specializes in listing optimization and advertising on Amazon. Robyn Johnson is nothing short of brilliant. In this episode of Wingnut Social, She shares some of her top tips and tricks to get visibility on Amazon.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:38] Wingnut Academy is launching SOON! [3:06] Mini News Sesh: Instagram’s “link in bio” tool [7:05] Learn more about Robyn Johnson [9:52] How an Amazon storefront benefits interior designers [12:38] What should an interior designer publish? [19:20] How to become a #1 Best-Seller on Amazon [25:46] The basics of SEO on Amazon [26:54] When you should launch an Amazon shop [33:14] Create a store or be an affiliate marketer? [34:26] How to set up an Amazon storefront [37:36] The What Up Wingnut Round! [39:21] How to connect with Robyn Johnson [43:39] Blooper Reel! Connect with Robyn Johnson Marketplace Blueprint Connect on LinkedIn Follow on Twitter Robyn’s Podcast Resources & People Mentioned Get FREE shipping on your first order from Article  Sign up for Wingnut Academy updates! Check out Episode #258 with Julianne Hendrickson Sign up for the next Wingnut Webinar Writers Access How to Become an Amazon Seller Amazon Seller University Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing The 14 Guiding Principles of Amazon Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination Get Robyn’s 20 page listing optimization guide for Amazon Get a FREE mini-audit of your listing How an Amazon storefront benefits interior designers The first thing you can do is self-publish a book on Amazon. Why does it matter? Because writing a book can catapult your career forward. Being a published author can help you get speaking engagements. It lends you credibility and brings in warm leads.  Robyn says you can’t short-change the power of Kindle. When Robyn published her first book, she printed books to give to people at a conference because they may throw away a business card but they won’t throw away a book. It was memorable and helped solidify her as an authority figure in the space. Secondly, you can create and sell your own branded products in an Amazon store. If you use the same piece repeatedly in your designs, you can contact the brand and see if they’ll let you sell a white-label version as part of your personal brand. Many companies are open to this.  If you’re looking for a brand that’s trying to find influencers, look for those that are active on Amazon. Many are embarrassed and afraid to seek out influencers. The worst they can say is no—but they’ll often say yes. When should you launch an Amazon shop? You can list as little as one item on Amazon. But Robyn notes that you need to aim to sell 40 items per month to break even on the $40 monthly fee it costs to be a professional seller. Amazon takes anywhere from 8–20% of the total cost of the product. If Amazon ships the item for you, you’ll pay storage fees as well as shipping fees based on the size and weight of the product (but likely still cheaper than shipping the product yourself). It can help you lower overall costs and increase your margins.  Any product you buy legitimately can be sold on Amazon. As long as the good is authentic, you’re welcome to sell it at any price you want. But take note—if Amazon feels the price is too high, they’ll make it more difficult for customers to buy.  Robyn points out that you will get better margins selling on your own website. However, if you have a high-demand product that people are looking for, keep in mind that some people will only shop on Amazon. Amazon has a ready-made base of buyers. It can help you grow your brand because users have already built a level of trust with Amazon.  What could you sell that differentiates you or is irreplaceable? How do you become a seller on Amazon? Robyn shares the secret to becoming a #1 best-seller on Amazon listen to find out what it is! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, YouTube, or TuneIn  
What does it take to attract luxury design clients? HINT: It doesn’t require being pretentious. It has everything to do with offering irreplaceable value. What can you bring to a project that a client can’t find anywhere else? It’s about providing a luxury experience coupled with what’s uniquely you. In this episode of Wingnut Socal, Melissa Sacco shares what she offers to attract luxury design clients that no one else can. She’ll help you think through what makes you irreplaceable.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [4:43] Mini News Sesh: TikTok has stories! [9:05] Learn all about Melissa Sacco [11:41] Melissa’s business model [18:37] How Melissa handles scope creep [21:40] The key to attracting luxury design clients [29:51] Specializing in high-end custom furniture [33:36] What a discovery call with Melissa looks like [35:05] Growing a business and delegating [38:36] The What Up Wingnut Round! [40:19] How to connect with Melissa Sacco [44:29] Blooper Reel! Connect with Melissa Sacco Melissa Sacco Interiors Follow Melissa on Instagram Resources & People Mentioned Get FREE Shipping on your first order from Article Sign up for Wingnut Academy updates! Check out the Google Ads webinar on April 26th at 11am Rocket Fuel by Gino Wickman and Mark Winters Working with luxury design clients From the first meeting, Melissa educates her clients about the design process and what makes her uniquely qualified to tackle their projects. Sacco Interiors focus on creating an elegance that’s never pretentious. Everything in your home will be cohesive—full of texture, dimension, and detail.  When you offer high-end luxury design, you must always be ahead of the game. There are endless moving parts and decisions to be made. It involves working out details and kinks to get a clear vision of what you’re trying to achieve. Interior designers bring value by being knowledgeable in all of the trades. You provide scaled drawings, elevations, specification sheets, paint schedules, complete on-site visits, and much more. Melissa gets to know her clients before she gets started with the design process. Her goal is for the client to be comfortable with her so she can nail their design. She’ll share images, ask deeper questions, and look at functionality—all with the goal to stay laser-focused throughout the project. Because once they start, they drive full force ahead. The only way that happens is if everyone is on the same page.  How Melissa attracts luxury design clients Melissa believes to attract the right people, you have to share who you are. Melissa’s ideal client is someone who’s worked hard to get where they are. They are down-to-earth and genuine people—just like her. That’s why these clients want their homes to be comfortable. Most have demanding jobs. They want to come home, walk through their front door, and feel at ease.  So Melissa shares inspirational quotes. She gives potential clients a glimpse behind the scenes. Lastly, she focuses on just being herself. If she’s on a jobsite doing an install, she’s in sneakers and a sweatshirt. She’s on the floor opening boxes, putting things together, and getting her hands dirty. She does whatever it takes to ensure a client’s project is amazing in the end. Don’t be fooled—high-end luxury clients are on social media. They’re people, just like anyone else. They’re professionals—doctors, lawyers, and CEOs of large companies. They talk. They network. They will share what you’ve done with other people.  Melissa’s irreplaceable customer furniture sets her apart If you become one of Melissa’s clients, you will see custom built-ins and one-of-a-kind furniture pieces that no one else will have. Why? Because she designs them herself, each piece different from the last. No one will ever have the same chair or built-in. Melissa’s custom pieces have positively impacted her bottom line. It differentiates her from other high-end interior designers and works to continually attract her ideal client.  How did Melissa start offering custom furniture? What has she done to delegate tasks and projects as she’s grown her business? Listen to the whole episode to hear her process. Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
John Dupra co-created Revel Woods, a platform that helps designers provide their clients with a luxury floor sourcing experience. Revel Woods elevates the traditional process so interior designers can offer a high-end service that can’t be replicated. In this episode of Wingnut Social, John shares how you can become a Revel Woods pro and become THE source for your client’s customer flooring (and maybe even create your own custom line of flooring).  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:28] Webinar and Wingnut Academy Announcements [4:12] Mini News Sesh: Instagram testing a new feed [7:45] Learn more about John Dupra and Revel Woods [12:53] The importance of offering a unique high-end experience [21:17] Revel Wood’s training and certification program [23:35] How to handle the relationship with your contractors [27:22] How Revel Woods works with eCommerce partners [30:27] Revel Woods is launching a NEW platform  [32:23] John’s take: The future of wood flooring [42:40] The What Up Wingnut Round [44:04] Where to learn more about Revel Woods [47:10] Blooper Reel! Connect with John Dupra Revel Woods Fine Hardwood Flooring Apply for Revel Woods Pro Account Revel Woodson Instagram Connect with John on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned Sign up for Wingnut Academy updates! How Interior Designers Leave Money on the Table with John Dupra Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion The importance of offering a unique high-end experience Sourcing floors typically includes taking clients to a flooring showroom they could have visited on their own. It’s been a necessary evil because there haven’t been options for designers to source trade options. Even trade-only showrooms offer brands available anywhere—unless you go truly custom and jump price levels. Most designers don’t need something that high-end. John points out that you wouldn’t go to Bob’s discount furniture outlet to source furniture for a high-end client. Why would you do it for flooring? You don’t want to offer a service or experience they could’ve done on their own. Revel Woods is a platform that sources flooring for you. Some of it might be available elsewhere but they private label everything.  Create your own line of luxury hardwood flooring Revel Woods is also developing a program with a manufacturer in Canada that will do a semi-custom made-to-order flooring. Flooring options are usually like the pizza aisle at the grocery store—you have premade cheese, pepperoni, supreme, etc. The program they’re developing is like a pizza shop where you choose your crust, sauce, cheese, and toppings.  You get to choose from 15 master colors, solid or engineered hardwood, and different widths, grades, lengths, and sheens. You can create your own collection exclusive to you and only available to your clients. They give you complete and total control over the process. John shares how pricing and wholesaling work, so keep listening.  Revel Woods is launching a NEW platform: Revel Woods Plus Revel Woods is partnering with a major manufacturer to build a visualization platform. You can use sample rooms or take a photo of a client's room and swap the flooring out. It will be built into the Revel Woods platform with hundreds of private-label trade-only options only accessible to designers. You can use this tool to show a client what the flooring will look like in their room. You can also send them the link to the product (without pricing).  Fine hardwood flooring will never go out of style, but luxury vinyl planks have been the go-to flooring option of late. What does John think will be the next trend? His answer may shock and will certainly surprise you! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Your interior design logo is a direct reflection of you and your brand. If you wanted to hire a photographer but the photos on their website were blurry or out of focus, you wouldn’t hire them, right? As an interior designer or architect, you are being judged on your branding more than many other professions.  Jason Byer—the Marketing and Partnerships Manager at Crowdspring—shares that strong brands attract more customers, justify premium price points, and build more resilient businesses. Your logo is an important part of your brand identity—is it up to snuff? Find out in this episode of Wingnut Social.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [0:58] Wingnut Webinar and Wingnut Academy announcements [3:04] Mini News Sesh: Moderator Feature for Instagram Live [6:07] Learn more about Jason Byer [8:28] How branding mistakes can negatively impact sales [10:38] The difference between brand and brand identity [13:31] The importance of your interior design logo [24:07] How to properly complete a brand refresh [32:10] The What Up Wingnut! Round [33:56] How to connect with Jason Byer and Crowdspring [37:23] Blooper Reel! Connect with Jason Byer Crowdspring Follow Jason on Twitter Connect with Jason on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned Check out the Google Ads webinar on April 26th at 11am Get updates on Wingnut Academy Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams The difference between brand and brand identity for interior designers Branding is a loosely used term that people often associate with logos. But branding is every interaction that a customer has with your company, your product, and your service. We know what certain brands deliver, right? Amazon customer service is top-notch. With companies like Starbucks or McDonalds, anywhere you go, you know the product will be consistent.  It’s not the same for architects and interior designers. There are many unknowns about your brand, your service, your price point, and your success. But a potential client does know you’re trying to sell them something. So you have to think about every touchpoint someone has with you. Your brand is being shaped whether you take an active role or not.  Your brand identity is everything that people see—logos, backgrounds, and filters on social media, image choices on your website, etc. Your brand identity should be informed by your brand. Because it conveys who you are, an interior designer's logo needs to be spot-on. A carefully crafted logo is key to consistent marketing of your design business The human brain can process images 1,000x faster than text. Many people poorly communicate what they do and who they serve. But a logo communicates that immediately. But what makes your interior design logo shine? Start with choosing the right color. You can easily Google the meanings of colors. The colors you choose are dictated by your brand and audience. If you want to create trust, you use the color blue. That’s why banks and financial advisors use blue. If you are serving the environment or want to create more profit you might use the color green. Red is used to make people pay attention. You want to think about how colors interact with your brand. Shape, style, and negative space are other aspects to consider. How do you play with different elements in your design? Will you use hard or soft angles? Are you trying to communicate strength and stability—or a closer connection with clients?  The actual logo icon can be a wordmark: the name of your business stylized in a unique and custom way. You can pair an icon with your wordmark that allows you to scale it. Why? Because a wordmark doesn’t usually fit well within a square. Logos have to be able to scale if you want them to look professional. A symbol paired with your wordmark works well in this. How to create an interior design logo that conveys your brand identity All of these things communicate your brand, So where do you start? With a creative brief. A good designer will ask: Who are your competitors? Who is your audience? What do you want them to know? How are you differentiated? Is trust more important than stability or growth? After answering these questions, you’d look at color, shapes, and icons that communicate your message. When you package that together, someone should intuitively understand who your audience is within fractions of a second. That’s what a visual brand identity should do.  If red is your color, you could make it your schtick—but it may not resonate with how everyone else views the color red. Red signifies danger, it makes you stop. It’s important to leave your preferences at the door and think about your market. What will trigger the right emotion in your customers?  Jason emphasizes that “Your logo is there to create an emotion. And it’s there to create intrigue. And it’s there to create consistency across all of your marketing.” How do you properly complete a brand refresh? Why should you hire a graphic designer instead of trying to create your logo yourself? Why should you avoid a logo generator at all costs? Jason answers all of your need-to-know questions about creating an interior design logo in this episode of Wingnut Social.   Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Hendrickson Interiors was born in 2016 when a friend asked Julianne to help design a new build. Julianne had no idea what she was doing but loved picking out pretty things. The builder loved her designs and hired Julianne to work together on more homes. Before she knew it, she had more clients than she knew what to do with.  Julianne had no business plan, no idea how to open an account with a furniture firm, and she was still teaching. After burning the candle at both ends for two years, Julianne decided to dive full-time into interior design. Since then, she’s grown from being a solopreneur to a team of six—a full-service custom interior design firm serving clients throughout Tampa Bay. She shares how she grew her team and learned to delegate in this episode of Wingnut Social! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:16] Check out our FREE webinars! [2:55] Mini News Sesh: Updated Creator Tags [6:10] Learn more about Julianne’s journey [10:16] Julianne’s philosophy on delegating and hiring [16:07] How to find a sweet spot with your waitlist [19:20] Why Julianne hired a business coach [21:36] Marketing before & After Wingnut Social [25:56] What’s next for Hendrickson Interiors? [28:34] Julianne’s strict budget [30:51] The What Up Wingnut Round! [32:29] How to learn more about Hendrickson Interiors Connect with Julianne Hendrickson Hendrickson Interiors Find Hendrickson Interiors on Instagram Resources & People Mentioned Check out our FREE webinars! Sign up for Wingnut Social Academy notifications The Fred Factor by Mark Sanborn  Dakota Design Co. Delegation is the key to scaling your business Julianne admits that she’s a control freak by nature. She likes to do things her way. But she learned that someone else could do things just as well as her, even if their choices are slightly different. When Julianne released control, they were able to get more work done. As the process became smoother, she decided to keep hiring and making more people happy. Julianne realized that you can delegate many different ways—it doesn’t have to be all or nothing. You can delegate someone to complete a task to be reviewed together. You can delegate through the design phase and review things together. Or you can delegate the design phase and review pricing together. Realizing this was eye-opening for Julianne. A good delegator knows how much someone is capable of. If you let someone do their job—without micro-managing them—it empowers them.  Building a time and hiring a business coach Julianne’s first large client gave her $50,000 to work with and she went straight to a bookkeeper and said, “Oh my God—what do I do with this?” She didn’t have any business accounts or QuickBooks. Her bookkeeper took the reins and has been with her ever since. Julianne also hired an operations manager (who handles the warehouse), a project coordinator, and someone who handles accessory purchasing full-time. Her most recent hire was a part-time team member to handle purchasing and tracking orders. Once Julianne had these people in place, she pulled herself out of the weeds. Then she hired a business coach. As a business owner, it’s easy to get enmeshed in the day-to-day of the business. Julianne’s business coach, Katie, has helped her gain a top-level view of her business. Katie helped Julianne walk through their design process from beginning to end. She pointed out missing pieces, helped her reformat things, and wrote every single thing Julianne gives a client. She has templates for everything—delayed items, trade days, apology letters, and more. It keeps the entire team on the same page, which is what elite clients want. It’s also important to scale and grow a team. A business coach can help unify your team and improve your efficiency. How to find a sweet spot with your waitlist Hendrickson Interiors is operating on a waitlist of six months or longer. When Julianne gets information from an inquiry, she’ll know if the potential client is a good fit immediately. Julianne is honest with people and lets them know if they’ll be on her waitlist. The clients that are worth it will wait. If they can’t wait, they’ll shop around until they can find someone that will do it the fastest—but it may not be the best quality. Julianne isn’t worried about turning down work because she knows the right people are already waiting for her.  How has Julianne’s interior design business grown since working with Wingnut Social? How does operating on a strict budget help her continue her upward trajectory? She shares more about her uber-successful design firm in this episode! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
When Jude Charles was 17, he took a video production class. At the end of the year, Jude’s teacher handed him a yellow envelope and told him that he had to start a business. Inside was his first set of business cards. Since then, Jude has dedicated his life to helping purpose-driven entrepreneurs tell their stories. He firmly believes that “Stories aren’t just how we connect as people and human beings but story is what differentiates you from someone else.” In this episode of Wingnut Social, Jude emphasizes that you have to start sharing your story. Video storytelling breaks through the noise and sets you apart. Jude shares how to overcome the intimidation factor, what type of stories to tell, and shares the best way to structure your story. Don’t miss it! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [0:58] Check out our FREE webinar with Stacey Martin [2:56] Mini News Sesh: Instagram’s Visual Discovery Tool [7:14] Learn more about videographer Jude Charles [11:19] Overcoming the intimidation of video  [15:30] Dramatic demonstration of proof [20:24] The importance of relatability in video content [24:04] Why you should just hit the record button [29:26] Jude’s videography tips for YouTube [31:54] Make testimonials part of your contract [36:12] The What Up Wingnut Round! [38:58] How to connect with Jude Charles [42:07] Blooper reel! Connect with Jude Charles Head on over to Jude’s Website Sign up for Jude’s Newsletter Connect with Jude on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned Sign up for Updates for Wingnut Academy March 24th at 11 am: Stacey Martin Webinar Hot Seat by Jeff Immelt Not Fade Away by Peter Barton Overcoming the intimidation of video Jude points out that everyone has three different stories that can be shared at any point. These stories are important to use every day on social media. You can repeat them over and over again. What are they?  Your origin story: How you got into the business you're in.  A transformational story: Testimonials, case studies, before & afters, etc. What does life look like after?  Why you’re doing the work you’re doing: Why should someone choose you over anyone else? But how do you get started? Jude has been a guest on over 70 podcasts. He’s studied storytelling for over 20 years. He still listens to himself tell his story so he can find new ways to tell it. It also helps him learn how to connect better with an audience. If you rehearse your story and practice recording it, it makes it less intimidating.  Jude’s video storytelling method: dramatic demonstration of proof You can’t just sit in front of a camera and tell your story. That’s boring, right? The way that you make your story interesting is by using the five different types of demonstrations: Behind the scenes: What happens as you’re sourcing materials? What does the design process look like? What is going on that people don’t usually get to see? Live illustration: How do you illustrate a point someone may not understand? Jude worked with someone who said, “Construction is like a puzzle.” So they got a large puzzle—of a project they had completed—and had the team put a puzzle together.  Social proof: This is testimonials, case studies, before and afters, etc.  Transformation: These are before and afters—how someone’s life is transformed after a change has been made. Unique mechanism: What makes you unique that someone else can’t copy? How can you demonstrate that on camera? Storytelling is about a specific moment in time. These moments have led you to where you are today. They influence how you’ve become a great designer. Jude points out many people believe that their story isn’t unique or interesting—that no one will care. But what debunks the idea that no one cares? Telling your story. You’ll realize that there will be someone it resonates with. Jude believes so strongly in the power of video storytelling that he only takes on five video production clients a year. Why? Because he works to understand who they are on a deep level. It takes time to be able to get to know someone and accurately portray the essence of who they are with video storytelling. Why you should just hit the record button Record yourself telling a story. Record yourself telling the story that you take for granted. Jude emphasizes that you shouldn’t sell yourself short—or overthink it. Your clients aren’t aware of everything you do to get a project completed. You want to create content so people understand what you do and can appreciate the value that you create. What you do will be different from the next interior designer. So where do you start?  Just document what you’re doing every day to get in the habit of creating content. You don’t need fancy equipment to get started because every smartphone is equipped with a great camera. You don’t even have to share it on social media. If you share a video of your process with a potential client, it makes them trust you more. It’s not only social proof but it’s a sales tool. You’ve made them part of the journey. Hearing something said 1,000 times is not as powerful as seeing it once.  Listen to the whole episode to hear Jude’s video storytelling tips for content on different social media platforms, including YouTube.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
What is a Google ad? How can you leverage Google ads to drive leads to your interior design business? How do you stand out against your competition? In this solo episode of Wingnut Social, Darla dives into the need-to-know basics of Google ads. It’s a great strategy—in conjunction with SEO—to drive traffic to your website and help you build your business.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [2:02] March 24th at 11 am: Stacey Martin Webinar [3:07] Mini News Sesh: The Career Gap feature on LinkedIn [5:47] Your marketing strategy: Google ads and SEO [8:17] Tip #1: Control what your audience sees with ad extensions [15:16] Tip #2: Leverage keywords in Google ads [17:08] Tip #3: Create a high-quality ad [20:40] TIp #4: Be specific [25:01] Blooper Reel!  Resources & People Mentioned March 24th at 11 am: Stacey Martin Webinar Episode #250 with Stacey Martin A good marketing strategy should leverage Google ads and SEO When you search on Google, the first four or five results say “ad” in the top left corner. Usually, you’ll see results related to the topic you searched for. Advertisers pay to get their ads on the page for that search.  Google ads are a great way to cut in line and get on the first page of Google and it’s a whole lot faster than SEO. SEO is still heavily important. You want the right keywords placed in particular places on your website. Why? So when someone searches for “Interior Designer Philadelphia” your business is in the top 10 search results. But proper SEO is a time-consuming process. It’s a long game, not a quick win. You have to invest a lot of time and often money to begin to see traction (sometimes it takes over a year). It’s a necessary evil—you have to do it—but Google ads are a great way to gain some traffic to your site now.  If your ad is structured properly, for the right amount of money, you can show up on the top of the first page. So when someone searches for “Susan McNuggets Interior Designer” they’ll find you. Even if your SEO is on par and you’re #1 in the search results, ads will still be placed above your business. That’s why ads are a great way to beat out the competition. Tip #1: Control what your audience sees with ad extensions At the top of the search results, you’ll see your headline. Underneath that, you’ll see categories that are called site extensions (i.e. for “Wingnut Social” you’ll see “podcast,” “social media marketing agency,” etc.). Google is searching the organic copy of your website and making the site extensions how they see fit.  But when you place an ad, you can dictate what the ad extensions will be. If I placed an ad for Wingnut Social, I don’t want “What’s happening” showing up on my ad. I want searchers to see how we can help them. I want to draw them to the website. You need to make sure whoever is creating your ad uses the proper extensions.  There are different types of extensions: Phone numbers: This will show the phone number plainly in the ad Location: This is super important if you’re relying on local traffic to find your design firm Image: When your ad shows up you see the square image to the right (too many people don’t use this!) Leveraging the ad extensions helps you get more qualified leads because someone is getting the information they need at first glance. If your ad is eye-catching and people click on it, Google will deem your ad more relevant. If that happens, sometimes Google will place your ad higher—even if you’re paying less. Tip #2: Leverage keywords in Google ads What keywords are people typing in the search bar that YOU want to be discovered for? These words NEED to be used in your ad. You can leave out flowery phrases like “The most luxurious designer” and focus on “Interior Designer Miami.” Keep the keywords in your ad straightforward. Secondly, make sure you use the keyword(s) in your title and description.  How do you find keywords? Google has a handy keyword planner you can use to look up keywords and see how many people are searching for a keyword. If the search volume is too low, Google won’t bother showing it.  Tip #3: Create a high-quality ad Where you rank on the results page can be bid on. You can outbid a higher-quality ad if you shell out more money. But it’s better to create a high-quality ad and pay less, right? Google looks at your quality score to determine how much you have to pay for your ad and how often they’ll show it.  A higher quality score will pay less for clicks because it enhances the user experience. Google wants people to get the results they’re searching for. It must be relevant. If that means showing your ad at $10 because the experience is better, it’s taken into consideration. If you have a lower score, you’ll pay more for the same exposure! What do they look at to determine your quality score? The speed at which your landing page loads How relevant your landing page is to your Google ad The keywords you’re optimizing your ad for on your landing page The most important aspect is the click-through rate. What is that? It’s how many people clicked on your ad. The average CTR in the home industry is 1.79%. So out of every 100 impressions, 1.79 of them are clicking on your ad. If a lot of people are clicking on your ad, you’ll get a higher score. Tip #4: Be specific Don’t try to rank for something generic that has heavy competition. What do you do? What is your positioning? What differentiates you from your competition? What is the experience someone can expect working with you? Choose something searchable. Don’t niche down so far into keyphrases that no one searches for. To master this, you have to do keyword research. It’s a lot of work but it can be lucrative when done right.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Is it time for you to grow your team? What are the signs it’s time to hire another team member? What process should you use to hire the best candidate for the job? Jamie Van Cuyk—the owner and lead strategist of Growing Your Team—is an expert in hiring and onboarding teams within small businesses. She shares some spectacular tips and strategies that you can implement immediately to grow your team the right way.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:05] Check out our next webinar with Stacey Martin! [3:03] Mini News Sesh: TikTok rolling out LONG videos [6:28] Learn more about Jamie Van Cyuk [9:36] 4 signs it’s time to hire another team member [13:54] Is your waitlist working for you—or against you? [16:11] How to craft the perfect job description [22:37] How to afford the help that you need [27:20] Myth-busting: Should you hire for passion over skill? [30:15] How to ensure someone is the right hire [38:42] Jamie’s opinion on the use of personality tests [42:27] How many candidates should you interview? [45:50] The What Up Wingnut! Round [49:03] How to connect with Jamie Van Cyuk [53:40] Blooper Reel! Connect with Jamie Van Cyuk Growing Your Team Friend on Facebook Follow on Instagram Check out her Pinterest Connect on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned Check out our next webinar with Stacey Martin! Stacey Martin’s Formula for Rockstar Interior Design Presentations Turn the Ship Around! by David Marquet Easy Render 4 signs it’s time to hire another team member Jamie shares that there are 4 things to watch out for that are clear signs you need to grow your team. But they aren't things that are normally top of mind during your day-to-day work. So Jamie recommends that you review these signs quarterly to see if it’s time to hire: Are you saying no to your ideal clients? If you’re saying no because your team is at capacity, it’s a problem. These people want to give you their money today. You don’t want to be losing clients that are the ideal fit for your business.  Are you losing customers due to poor customer service? Are customers pulling out of projects or backing out of contracts? If you’re not communicating and meeting their expectations throughout the process, you not only lose their business but you lose them as a referral source.  You want to do something new but you can’t. Maybe you want to start offering coaching, education, or open a retail store but you can’t because you don’t have time.  You lack skill or knowledge that is needed in your business. You can go and learn something yourself—or you can hire for that skillset. Are you the right person to learn and execute that skill? Sometimes paying the expert is worth the money because it lets you spend your time where it should be focused.  Once you’ve decided it’s time to grow your team, what are your next steps? A great hiring process.  How to craft the perfect job description (and where to post it) Jamie believes that you shouldn’t use a templated job description when creating a job description. The job post may attract someone who can do the skill you’re hiring for but likely doesn’t speak to the right fit for your team and culture. Their style and personality have to mesh with you and your team values. So what do you do? Walk through these questions: What is your ideal candidate?  What are their roles and responsibilities?  What does success look like in your business?  Who will you be happy to give your money to?  What’s unique about your company? What will make someone say, “Yes, this is the place for me!” The goal of a job posting is to attract the right candidate and turn away the wrong ones. Once you develop your ideal person your job posting should speak to that person.  You can design a room that you love. But is that the right room and right design for every client? No! It might not work in their home. You may use the same concepts, materials, and create a similar flow but things will look different. A role might have similar responsibilities but will look different in each company.  Where is the best place to post a job opening? Should you hire for passion over skill? Listen to hear Jamie’s take.  How to ensure someone is the right hire Ask questions that produce answers of value. You need to reduce the number of hypothetical questions you use, i.e. “What would you do if…?” Instead, ask questions that have them support their answers with examples: “So tell me about a time when…?” Ask them about something they will experience working for your business. Have they worked with high-end, demanding clients? How did they handle the experience? If you’re hiring someone entry-level, they may not have had those experiences in an interior design company but have had similar experiences where they have worked. They can transfer those skills to your business.  Develop a case study or opportunity for them to present their skill. If they say they know how to do CAD drawings, give them everything they need to sit down and complete a quick project. What are they able to put together? You have to know what you’re testing them on. Are you testing their ability to think through the information they’re given? Their ability to use a tool? Their thought process? You can’t test them on something that aligns with your brand because they don’t know that yet.  Move through the process quickly. Align a case study with an interview so they knock out everything immediately. But Jame is careful to note that you can’t ask too much of them before you’ve spent time with them. Don’t waste their time—and yours—if they won’t make it to the next round of interviews anyway.  What’s an easy way to weed talent out of the process (not necessarily in a good way)? Should you use personality tests in your hiring process? How many candidates should you interview? Jamie covers these questions—and so much more—in this episode! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
What is the metaverse? How will the metaverse impact the interior design industry? Is designing a virtual world the future of architecture and design as we know it? Tom Puukko joins Darla in this episode of Wingnut Social to have a conversation about virtual architecture and design. Don’t miss this futuristic conversation! Tom is a British entrepreneur who's been working in digital innovation since 1998. He founded interiors brand Feathr.com, a marketplace where artists monetize their artworks as wallpapers and fabrics. Most recently, he's created Metaverse Interior Design, the world's first interior design marketplace for the metaverse. What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:40] Upcoming webinar with Stacey Martin [2:55] Mini News Sesh: Instagram reels from stories [5:12] Learn more about Tom Puukko [9:00] Learn the basics of the metaverse [15:24] How the metaverse impacts the interior design industry [19:16] The necessary skills to succeed in the metaverse [24:04] Is metaverse design the design of the future? [26:51] Where designers and architects should get started [29:53] NFTs and Cryptocurrency in the metaverse [33:03] The What Up Wingnut! Round [34:17] Learn more about Tom and Metaverse Interior Design [38:22] Blooper Reel! Connect with Tom Puukko Metaverse Interior Design Feathr.com Connect on LinkedIn Follow on Twitter Resources & People Mentioned Check out our next webinar with Stacey Martin! Stacey Martin’s Formula for Rockstar Interior Design Presentations Good to Great by Jim Collins Oculus Quest 2 The Sandbox Decentraland Horizon Worlds Unity Blender So what IS the metaverse? The metaverse consists of 3D worlds where you can interact and live a digital life. You can choose a life that’s richer, more engaging, and more entertaining than a 2D platform. You can do almost all things that you can in the real world—gamble at casinos, dance at nightclubs, visit an art gallery, build a home, etc.  Currently, you’re able to experience the metaverse through some sort of headset. We currently have proto-metaverses—the early inklings of what’s to come. If you’re in the US, you may have access to Meta’s Horizon Worlds or Decentraland. But these worlds still lack functionality and the renderings are underwhelming. But the seeds of what will come have been planted.  So how is the metaverse applicable to interior designers and architects? Metaverse interior design: the impact on the interior design industry Digital technology has allowed architects and interior designers to connect with customers and market themselves transactionally. But the metaverse will open up a whole new world. The metaverse is currently being built but the people building it are coders. They don’t understand how spaces and subjects interact. They don’t understand how proportions can change a building. They don’t have the knowledge architects and interior designers are trained with. Because of this, the current experience in a metaverse feels like a gimmick.  Architects and designers should be the people designing and creating the spaces. Doing so will create a whole new revenue stream. There’s no limitation of the potential volume that can be put into the space. You can sell multiple versions of different models. Designers become content creators. You can sell spaces to hundreds of thousands of people. Tom’s community—Metaverse Interior Design—will be the destination to source interior design and architect services and products.  The necessary skills to succeed in the metaverse Luckily, metaverse interior design doesn’t necessarily rely on coding. But designers do need to have an advanced understanding of how 3D models work. If you are competent with 3D modeling and own space in a metaverse, you can move a 3D model from a computer to the metaverse. The challenge in moving between the real world and metaverse design is understanding the technical limitations of space.  Each “world” has its own set of technical specifications. Tom points out that it all boils down to low poly count (polycount is the total number of polygons found in a three-dimensional model). 3D models in the real world have a high polycount. Currently, everything in the metaverse must be simplified to a lower polycount. So you have to learn how to take a 3D model and simplify it.  Just as in real-world design, you must understand the creative vision of the client and make their vision a reality in the space you have to work with. The limitations of the real world—building codes, fire regulations, gravity, etc.—can go out the window in the metaverse. People will buy creative and conceptual ideas that can't exist in the real world. Design in the metaverse is both artwork and architecture. Is this the design of the future? Where should designers and architects get started? Learn why you should become an early adopter of metaverse interior design in this episode! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Do you need an interior design degree to successfully run an interior design firm? If you don’t get a formal education, where do you get an education? KD Reid is a successful interior designer with a passion for art and architecture and a reputation for crafting beautiful and functional spaces. Guess what? Zero formal design education. He shares how he grew from intern to business owner in this episode of the Wingnut Social podcast!  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:24] Check out our FREE photography webinar [2:40] Mini News Sesh: Liking stories on Instagram [5:50] Learn all about interior designer KD Reid [9:21] A unique way to gain interior design experience [14:53] How KD broke out on his own [17:51] Advice for designers without an extensive network  [19:50] How KD delegates large projects  [24:54] Where KD’s innate talent stems from [26:52] Where will KD’s future lead?  [29:21] The What Up Wingnut! Round [30:41] How to learn more about KD [33:27] Blooper Reel! Connect with KD Reid KD Reid Interiors Follow KD on Instagram Resources & People Mentioned FREE Webinar with Linda Holt on 2/24: How to Take Magazine-Worthy Smartphone Photos  Dekar Design Mikel Welch B Squared Harlem Gail Doby Coaching Parsons Yellowbrick Program Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem: A Memoir From Craigslist to creator KD graduated with a degree in Sociology from Montclair State University. After graduating, he spent eight years providing mental health services in the LGBT community. Throughout his career, interior design was a hobby he enjoyed. But he never saw it as a lucrative career path. He would design spaces for friends and family. At a time when Craigslist was popular, KD came across some design internship opportunities. He'd snag one here and there which allowed him to learn some interior design skills. Then he came across Dekar Design, a woman-led design firm focusing on hospitality and commercial projects. It was his first real look into the world of interior design. They saw that he had an eye for design and immediately let him jump on projects and learn hands-on.  KD’s journey from design assistant to principal interior designer  After working with Dekar Design, KD had the opportunity to meet Mikel Welch. One of Mikel’s first projects in NYC was a Harlem restaurant called B Squared. KD had the opportunity to work on the project which led to working with Mikel for five years. He started as a design assistant, transitioned to project manager, and became a lead designer.  Mikel gave him hands-on experience and allowed him to learn other facets of interior design. KD got to dive into set design, staging, virtual merchandising, and more. This job gave him the confidence he needed to take on projects by himself. Because of COVID, many people in KD’s network wanted to invest in building out home offices, which propelled KD to start his own business.  Where will KD’s future lead? KD wants to be clear that he is not anti-education. He simply learned that it’s not necessary to find success in the industry. But KD has goals. To reach them, he’s attending Parson’s Yellowbrick Design Program to take a product design course. One of his strengths is home decor, accessories, and styling. They’re the jewelry of a space, right? KD’s dream is to launch his own home accessory line. What is KD’s advice for designers who don’t have an extensive network? What does his team look like? What marketing strategy does he employ? Listen to the whole episode to learn more! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331(connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Are you an interior designer just clamoring to work with the rich and famous? Do you want to be the designer to the stars? If you’re ready to work with affluent clients, Melissa Galt is the business coach to turn to. She loves the business of design more than design itself, which is why coaching is 95% of her business. She helps designers learn how to earn more in less time—and love their businesses a whole lot more in the process. In this episode of Wingnut Social, she shares the unique strategy she uses to attract her ideal clients (HINT: It’s all about doing what you love).  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social: Interior Design Podcast [1:23] Check out our FREE photography webinar [3:27] Mini News Sesh: Pinterest’s augmented reality feature [6:15] Learn more about Melissa Galt [9:02] The top three personas of affluent clients [17:32] The key to attracting affluent clients [20:18] How to determine a persona’s value system [23:55] What these clients look for when hiring a designer [25:52] How to work smarter, not harder [29:19] Hooking affluent clients on social media [35:25] The What Up Wingnut! Round [36:40] How to connect with Melissa Galt [40:32] Blooper Reel! Connect with Melissa Galt Melissa’s website Connect on LinkedIn Follow on Instagram Get Melissa’s book Resources & People Mentioned FREE Webinar with Linda Holt on 2/24: How to Take Magazine-Worthy Smartphone Photos  It's Not How Good You Are, It's How Good You Want to Be by Paul Arden The top three personas of affluent clients Most affluent clients aren’t obvious. In many cases, they’re the ones that are earning and saving. They are selective in where they invest their money. Melissa has nailed down five groups of avatars and nine overall personas of affluent clients based on personal experience. What are the three most common she’s come across?  The “millionaires next door.” These are the clients that are easy to educate on why next-level services are warranted. They are always learning and growing their knowledge base. They are grounded, down to earth, and make the best choices for themselves. They are the perfect clients to have because they’re loyal.  The “got rich quick.” These are the fast spenders. They’re often star athletes, musicians, startup entrepreneurs, etc. They tend to select things that are flashy and lower-quality. Melissa’s tip? Make sure they pay you upfront. Melissa has had multiple clients who were swindled out of their money.  The “Sinks and Dinks.” They are either single-income or dual-income families with no kids. Kids are a large investment, right? When you don’t have them, it makes a huge difference. Melissa’s best clients were sinks and dinks.  You select your clients as much as they select you. Melissa emphasizes that “It doesn’t matter how much money I make if I’m not proud of it.” Rich or not—choose wisely.  How to work smarter—not harder—to attract your ideal client You need to be clear on your ICP and only work to attract those clients. The millionaires next door are low-key, private, and confidential. Marketing to them is going to be far different than the fast-spenders who are flashy in everything they do. You have to choose one persona to chase to position yourself correctly in the market.  Then you need to get clarity on where to meet and connect with your avatar. Who is already serving them that isn’t competing with you? Then you work to build your own circle of influence (or what Melissa likes to call your “Profit Posse”) and connect with these people. Co-market, co-promote, and create opportunities for introductions.  Another simple strategy? Look at your lifestyle. What do you like to do? What if you took that to the next level? If you love wine-tasting, skip the free tasting and shell out for the $250 dinner with wine pairings. You’re far more likely to rub elbows with affluent clients there. Melissa considers this “net-living” not networking. She states that “Doing what you love at a higher level will deliver the affluent clients that you most want in a very aligned and authentic way.”  How do you determine a persona’s value systems? What do affluent clients look for when hiring a designer? How do you hook them on social media? Check out the whole episode to learn more! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn
When Renée Biery entered the interior design industry, she thought everyone did renovations. It wasn’t until she moved back home to Delaware that she realized she—especially as a woman—was the anomaly. She had to work hard to show how much value she could add to a renovation project for both the client and the contractors. She believes that Interior designers CAN and should do more. In this episode of Wingnut Social, she shares how you can learn to master those tricky renovation projects (and the clients that come with them). What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:25] Check out our FREE photography webinar [3:30] Mini News Sesh: Scheduled live displays on Instagram [5:10] Learn more about Renée Biery [7:29] Why you should be an expert in project management [15:33] Why don’t more designers take on renovation projects [23:46] How this business model can fill your pipeline [26:26] How Renée charges for her projects [30:10] Market your services with social media + networking [36:55] The What Up Wingnut round! [38:22] How to learn more from Renée Biery [44:35] Blooper Reel! Connect with Renée Biery Only Girl on the Jobsite podcast Only Girl on the Jobsite course Follow Renée on Instagram Friend on Facebook Resources & People Mentioned FREE Webinar with Linda Holt on 2/24: How to Take Magazine-Worthy Smartphone Photos  Atomic Habits by James Clear The Book of Boba Fett Why you should become proficient in project management As the owner of deVignier design, Renée has almost 30 years of experience in the industry. She’s formally trained in practical interior architecture with advanced technical and rendering proficiency. She sought to be a one-stop-shop that offers everything from project management and design to decorating. She loves being part of the design and build. It also sets her apart from other women in the industry.  Despite her formal education, Renée believes that it isn’t necessary nor should it be a barrier to entry. She learned more from the women she’s worked with over the years. You simply learn as you go. You can find contractors, architects, etc. who will work with you to get a permit or draw a design.  Renée believes that offering renovation projects will sustain the industry. Why? Because procurement is becoming a problem. Many firms are giving up that revenue stream. But what does that leave them? There are only so many billable hours in design. If you’re trying to salvage your billable hours, managing renovation projects is a great way to get started.  Why don’t more designers take on renovations? Renée believes that many designers lack confidence in their skills. Plus, it can be intimidating. Everyone watches HGTV and every episode of any show features some great challenge to overcome. Those challenges get expensive. That’s why Renée encourages people to gain experience in numerous ways. She started “The Only Girl on the Jobsite” because as the only woman among 20 guys on a worksite, you feel like the odd man out. So you have to build skills to level the playing field.  Where do you get your feet wet? Do you intern under someone with the experience necessary? Some people have renovated their own spaces and feel comfortable learning as they go. Plus, if you have some experience, you can build on it. Price yourself at an obtainable level until you’ve built a portfolio. There will be clients that are excited about getting a great price and don’t mind that you’re learning. But above all, do not fake it til you make it or you’ll end up making expensive mistakes.  Taking on renovation projects sets you apart and gives you a leg up. What else can you do to break the mold? If you decide to add renovations and project management to your portfolio, how do you market yourself? Renée shares a plethora of advice in episode #251—don’t miss it! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331 connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Interior design presentations are not easy to knock out of the park. If you’ve spent hours on a presentation only to receive a lackluster response from a client, you’re not alone. Stacey Martin has a mind-boggling 95% approval rating—without revisions—on her presentations. What’s the secret to her success? She shares the mind-blowing systems and processes she uses in this episode of the Wingnut Social podcast!  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [2:07] Check out our FREE photography webinar [3:15] Mini News Sesh: Subscriptions on Instagram [7:22] Learn more about Stacey Martin [12:02] Stacey’s interior design presentation [20:44] Brand storytelling is the key [26:06] Feeling out a client’s budget [30:42] 3 pitfalls to avoid in your presentations  [34:53] The What Up Wingnut Round! [40:38] Blooper Reel!  Connect with Stacey Martin Follow Stacey on Instagram Stacey’s design business: The Freshmaker Resources & People Mentioned FREE Webinar with Linda Holt on 2/24: How to Take Magazine-Worthy Smartphone Photos  BOOK: The Legacy of Luna BOOK: How to Win Friends and Influence People Nikki Amodio Take your potential clients on a journey Before Stacey became an interior designer, she was in trend forecasting and design for sports brands. The higher-ups were notorious for being naysayers—many designers didn’t get their designs approved. But Stacey soon realized that the blame wasn’t always on the management. The designers didn’t know how to present their ideas in a manner that would get them a “yes.”  So Stacey took note. When it was her turn to present, she started with the “why.” She started her presentation focusing on the brand’s pain points before she shifted to the goals of the line. By the time she got to her ideas and solutions, the VP had already been agreeing with everything she said. She took him on a journey.  She sold him on why her idea was the solution to their problems. He knew how it would lead them to make them more money. When Stacey transitioned to interior design, she used this same process with her clients. It’s about the design AND the client In addition to hearing someone’s design woes, Stacey asks questions that are NOT related to design. She wants to learn who they are. What music do they like? Favorite song? Favorite band?  Where do they like to travel? What are their favorite trips? Where do they want to visit? What do they do for fun? Do they like to cook? Is yoga their jam? Do they have kids or pets?  These things help Stacey build a visual story and build an aesthetic direction. She distills what she’s learned down to three images that define the direction they’ll take. So when they get to the design presentation, she knows who they are and what problems they want to solve.  How to nail your interior design presentation She labels their project with three keywords that hone in on the goal for the design. It might be modern, timeless, and family-friendly. This sets the tone for the presentation. She iterates the problem they’re looking to solve (i.e. lack of storage space) and shares her solution.  Stacey may include a “tortoise-shell side table” as a nod to this person’s trip to Aruba where they swam with sea turtles. As she explains the choices she made, she talks specifically about how each element reflects and solves their problem(s). The details tie back to their memories and things that make them happy. It’s creating a story about who they are and how the room reflects their personality. The more you can show your client the “why” of your selections and how you’re making choices based on who they are, the more they feel understood. That leads to trust. Every piece is a thoughtful choice based on who they are. As a designer, Stacey emphasizes that “You’re using your talents and your skillset to curate those choices to create an immersive environment that really feels like who they are.” What are three pitfalls you should avoid in your presentations? Listen to the whole episode for more of Stacey’s strategy.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Robin Wilson grew up in Austin, TX with awful asthma and allergies. Her parents found a holistic pediatrician that said, “You can raise a strong child or you can raise a child on strong medicine.” So she started swimming, biking, walking, track, etc. to strengthen her lungs instead of taking strong medication. Because of her background, she became an advocate for clean construction. Any number of things on a site can lead to an asthmatic episode. So she dove deep into hypoallergenic design. Now, Robin Wilson is a U.S. lifestyle brand, author, designer and real estate developer. Named to the Inc. magazine Female Founders 100 List in 2020, she is a world-class thought leader on hypoallergenic, sustainable and eco-conscious options for the B2B and B2C marketplace. She is a two time #1 Amazon bestselling author and has been featured on multiple news segments as an expert on eco-friendly design and allergy-focused segments. What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [4:29] Mini News Sesh: Vertical Stories on Instagram [6:40] Designer Robin Wilson’s origin story [14:21] Robin’s thoughts on design school [22:20] From project management to Clean Design Home [33:42] Robin’s marketing process [36:47] Clean Design Home x Martex [47:57] How Robin’s marketing focus has shifted [54:38] The What Up Wingnut! Round [56:50] How to connect with Robin Wilson [58:45] Blooper Reel! Connect with Robin Wilson See an overview of Robin’s company at https://ablueegg.com/ Robin’s Book: Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle Clean Design Home x Martex Follow Robin Wilson Home on Instagram Resources & People Mentioned Photography webinar coming up Feb. 24th! Wingnut Social Episode #12 with Linda Holt The Dream Giver by Bruce Wilkinson Resource Furniture Robin’s story: following her passion Robin had a wonderful mentor/sponsor that helped her navigate her future. He asked her, “What would you do if you knew you could not fail?” followed by, “What is your passion?” Her answer was real estate. So he taught her how real estate worked and how to build wealth. She went on to get her Master’s in Real Estate Finance. She was one of three women in the graduate program.  One of her professors told her that she wasn’t going to have an easy road because she was a black woman in a man’s world. Instead of being offended, she decided to listen to him. He advised her to figure out something she could do immediately to make her degree worth something. He recommended she become a project manager—the busy homeowners’ best friend. She made $1.2 million in her first year in project management. From project management to Clean Design Home Part of Robin’s design signature started because she worked on tiny New York apartments that had doors everywhere. So she started implementing pocket doors in her design. On one particular project, she bought a Murphy bed that looked like a desk. She found a table that expanded to fit six people. She treated this client like royalty, not realizing she had connections in the industry.  After this project, Robin got a phone call from Adam Glassman, the creative director for Oprah. She didn’t return his phone calls because she thought she was being pranked. He called three times before she realized it was the real deal, so she called him back. One project changed the trajectory of her future career.  Robin firmly believes, “If you do great work, people will tell four people. If you do poor work and you’re nasty, mean, and rude—they will tell 20 people at a dinner party…If you do great work they will tell someone that’s a likely customer in the future.” Clean Design Home Clean Design Home came about when Robin wrote her book, “Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle.” It became a #1 best-seller on Amazon. Clean design is everything she does. She puts clean products in people’s homes. She supports hypoallergenic lifestyles.  Robin had a legacy brand, Robin Wilson Home. But she saw a shift in consumer spending from paying for quality to paying for cheaper products on Amazon. She felt her brand was gone and she was close to quitting. But Robin ended up being featured in articles about the top 10 black businesses to support.  She changed to a generic name (Clean Design Home) to speak to her niche. She dug deep into the hypoallergenic space and created luxury products. She found a licensing partner and saw a 3,000% sales increase after the New York Magazine article. She made $80,000 in 30 days. Then she was signed by West Point Home (Martex) and they created “Clean Design X Martex.” In 2020, she was ready to quit. Now she has a global brand in Macy’s.  What does Robin believe was the secret to her success? How has Robin’s marketing focus shifted since she launched her businesses? What tips does she share to help your business grow? Listen to the whole episode to hear more of her awe-inspiring journey.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331 (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Does the thought of raising your rates leave you saying “Uh-uh, no way?” Are you worried that the covid-induced interior design “bubble” may pop? What if you raise your prices and the bubble does burst? These questions contribute to the mindset struggles designers face when considering raising their rates. So how do you determine if you should make a change? In this episode of Wingnut Social, Danielle Hayden shares some exercises that can help you make the decision. Danielle is a reformed CFO on a mission to help rule-breaking female entrepreneurs understand their numbers to gain confidence to create sustainable profits. She’s the co-owner of Kickstart Accounting, where she helps her clients with bookkeeping, financial analysis, and provides education to help them make informed decisions.  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [3:22] Mini News Sesh: An algorithm-free Instagram feed?  [8:20] Learn more about Danielle Hayden [15:28] Thinking about raising your rates? Do these exercises. [22:50] Determining your take-home pay depends on your goals [30:12] It’s time to change your mindset about raising your rates [36:47] The What Up Wingnut! Round [41:38] Blooper Reel! Connect with Danielle Hayden Kickstart Accounting Inc.  Connect with Danielle on Instagram The Entrepreneur Money Stories Podcast Resources & People Mentioned Built to Sell by John warrilow  Wingnut Social Episode #26 Thinking about raising your rates? Do these exercises. Exercise #1: How much of your time and energy goes into a single project? What are your average operating expenses per month? Multiply the time you spend in your business by your hourly rate. Add your operating expenses to that number. This is your break-even number. Divide that by your number of clients each month. This gives you an idea of whether or not you’re profitable. Secondly, what are your goals? Is it your goal to outsource parts of your business, such as social media or bookkeeping? Do you want to be hands-on with every project? Or do you want to oversee a team of designers? What will that cost you?  Grab a piece of paper now and add up how many clients you need to take on to hit the numbers you need to reach your goals. You may see that if you don’t raise your rates, you’ll never meet those goals. It’s a clear way to see whether or not you need to raise your prices.  Exercise #2: Danielle recommends that you go into your accounting system and run a P&L report for the last 24 months. Looking at your history helps you determine your average spend per account and what you need to spend to keep your business moving forward. Your history helps determine the steps you take today.  Change your mindset about raising your rates If you don't want to raise your rates, that’s okay. But think about your goals. What if you can serve fewer clients at a higher price tag and be happier doing it? You may lose a client in the short term but the long-term impact will be worth it. Your mindset will change. The client paying more for your service will value you and your brand.  Darla doubled her rates after she gained some experience which helped her land more clients. Their perception of her value increased with her rates. You don’t have to make a bold move like Darla’s. Figure out what works and what doesn’t, track the numbers, and make an adjustment. There’s no such thing as failure—there is learning and growing. Changing your mindset and changing your rates can be transformative.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331  (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
The pandemic shutdown sent so many of us home to work but designers were a bit ahead of that curve, generally speaking, since many worked from home already. But regardless how we got there, home can become a bit lonely and distracting when it comes to productivity and accomplishment. How do you deal with it? Mara Hauser says a CoWorking space may be your solution. Mara is a designer herself. She guides her client’s big ideas into executable designs that focus heavily on brand-building and high-level analysis, including programming, product and amenities mix, adjacency diagrams, and determining “who you serve.” But she’s also CEO of 25 North CoWorking Spaces and understands the powerful benefits a coworking space can be to anyone, including designers and their teams. On this episode we discuss the possibilities, how to make the transition, how to benefit the most from involvement at a CoWorking space, and more. Listen up, Wingnuts! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:02] This episode’s topic: Gettin’ out of the house! [2:48] The Mini-News Sesh!: Facebook profiles can become professional profiles [6:51] Who is Mara Hauser? [11:09] Is the trend toward home-working going to continue? [13:12] A hybrid work approach interior designers may be able to use [20:08] How large of a design firm could use this model? [22:20] How important is the design aspect of a coworking or office space? [25:22] Mitigating the sense of anxiety that can occur making this transition [30:15] Reasons you will benefit from utilizing a coworking space [33:20] The WHAT UP WINGNUT? round Connect with Mara Hauser 25 North Coworking Spaces - Mara’s company Workplace Studio Interior Design - Mara’s design studio Follow Mara on Twitter  Resources & People Mentioned BOOK: Shoe Dog by Phil Knight Wingnut episode with Rex Rogasch - Hospitality Design The Advantages and Disadvantages of Working From Home If you’ve worked at home, you know the pain. Fido is barking outside your door. The cat walks across your keyboard when you’re out of the room. Netflix is right out there in the living room, beckoning you to continue your latest binge. These are some of the irritations but there are also limitations. It’s hard to host professional meetings at home, especially with clients. It’s also problematic to have your team work out of your home without turning your street into a used car lot every day. Mara says these are exactly the things a CoWorking space is designed to solve. Listen to learn if a CoWorking option is a good fit for you. You might be surprised how adaptable and collaborative it could be for you and your team. Multipurpose spaces are massively important in your working space and the CoWorking space you choose Most designers understand the principles behind good design (of course), so they get the realities around spaces designed to serve specific purposes. That reason alone may have you on the skeptical side of the fence when it comes to using a CoWorking space. But it doesn’t have to, especially when it comes to Mara’s locations. Being a designer, she’s done everything in her team’s power to create flexible spaces that can be transformed into what each client needs. They utilize casters to move things around and remake the space. The lighting, HVAC, and amenities are provided with comfort and productivity in mind. They also include outdoor work and meeting spaces to enable teams to make the most of fresh air and natural surroundings. If you were to visit one of her locations you would be impressed with the flexibility and effectiveness of the spaces she’s created. Listen to this episode to learn if a CoWorking space is right for you and your team! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-786-206-4331  (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
One of the many challenges for up-and-coming designers (and those of us who have been in the industry for a while, too) is in the area of “working knowledge.” There’s a LOT to know and it seems like nothing but time is going to help you know it. But the guest on this episode proves that even though she’s been in the industry for over 20 years, there are clear things you can do to accelerate your learning curve. Andrea Hysmith of A.S.H. Designs (in Ellicott City, MD) is an Interior Specialist, Kitchen and Bath Designer, Manufacturer Representative, Speaker, and Presenter, and has been sharing her knowledge of luxury design for over 20 years. She focuses on residential and light commercial spaces and recently opened her own design space in Ellicott City as the first woman of color to do so. She’s a hard-working, hustling woman who has done the work necessary to educate herself about her craft, all for the sake of serving her clients with excellence. You’ll learn a lot about developing your own working knowledge, faster, from her intentional approach, so be sure you listen. What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [0:42] Where I’ve been… answering the common question, “Why the break???” [2:09] The Mini-News session: Instagram Reels (reply with another reel) [5:16] Andrea Hysmith: Designer extraordinaire [13:04] The movement to curate antiques and how Andrea got into it [21:25] What is “Certified Aging in Place?” [28:27] How did Andrea become an independent manufacturer rep? [36:58] Why it’s important to be true to yourself as you being your design career Connect with Andrea Hysmith Andrea’s company: ASH Design in Ellicott City, MD Andrea on Instagram Resources & People Mentioned Andrew Joseph Toma Clark Haines  Certified Aging In Place Specialization T.D. Jakes Highpoint Market What They Don’t Teach You In Design School Facebook Group BOOK: Wild by Cheryl Strayed (affiliate link) Taking a proactive approach to design by getting into the trenches It’s easy to feel that you are handicapped when you need to know more about a specialized area of design but simply don’t. Andrea never let that stop her. She’s a “go get it” kind of woman. She takes the initiative to find the resources and open the doors that will provide her with the knowledge she needs — and you can do the same. For example, at one point in Andrea’s career, she needed to know more about custom cabinetry so she reached out to establish a relationship with a custom cabinet builder and worked shifts in his facility to learn what she needed to learn. She’s done the same with painters, a plumbers, and other specialized tradesmen, all for the sake of educating herself at the source. Though it may seem that’s a lot of irons in the fire, Andrea says it’s all cohesive if you keep things integrated within a common goal or mission. Special certifications can help you stand out in a crowded area Andrea holds a special certification that Darla had never heard of. The National Association of Home Builders offers a “Certified Aging in Place Specialist” certificate and Andrea is one of those who have completed the course they offer. It’s a specialty in the design and refurbishment of homes to enable those who are aging or otherwise disabled to continue to live in their homes rather than having to move. Andrea says this is especially important to her because she has clients who have been with her for many years. Her certification enables her to serve them in new, fitting ways as they age and the relationship continues. She’s also had people reach out to her specifically because she holds the certification, and at one community event a realtor who works primarily in retirement communities asked if Andrea would serve as a recommended service provider for those the realty group serves. Are there certifications that would serve the community where you work or the clientele you specialize in serving? If so, go get them! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-877-WINGNUT (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Carol Cox is the founder of Speaking Your Brand®. Her mission is to help women create thought leadership platforms to have the impact they desire in their field. But how do you get to that point? Is becoming a thought leader worth the time and effort? In this episode of Wingnut Social, Carol speaks about the power of sharing your personal experiences, what container you should use for your thought leadership, and the basics of her VOICE method. Don’t miss this awesome replay. 1v7P9R7TkavQBnV12gvh
Comments (4)

Stacy Hernandez

Loved this episode! But truly, what is there not to love about Corey Damon Jenkins!? He is so talented, informative and genuine. 🍎🍎🖊️🖊️ I get so much out of your podcast!! keep'em coming, love to laugh and learn with you and Natalie.

Jul 31st
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