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The John Batchelor Show

Author: John Batchelor

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The John Batchelor Show is a breaking-news program that focusses on global politics, economics, war-fighting, hard sciences, space exploration, literature and whimsy. Four hours a night, seven days a week; most rigorous news analysis in the New World; followed daily in 192 countries.
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Image: Colored lithograph (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithograph) of Washington Navy Yard, circa 1862.Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack, by Steve Twomey (https://www.amazon.com/Steve-Twomey/e/B01M9JM75R/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Holter Graham (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Holter+Graham) as narrator.  Simon & Schuster Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Simon+%26+Schuster+Audio) (Publisher).  Audible Audiobook – Unabridgedhttps://www.amazon.com/Countdown-Pearl-Harbor-Twelve-Attack/dp/B01M4KTL6P/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=steve+Twomey+countdown&qid=1575849535&s=audible&sr=1-1A fascinating look at the twelve days leading up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor—the warnings, clues and missteps—by a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. In Washington, D.C., in late November 1941, admirals compose the most ominous message in Navy history to warn Hawaii of possible danger, but they write it too vaguely. They think precautions are being taken, but never check to see if they are. A key intelligence officer wants more warnings sent, but he is on the losing end of a bureaucratic battle and can't get the message out. American sleuths have pierced Japan's most vital diplomatic code, and Washington believes it has a window on the enemy's soul—but it does not. In a small office at Pearl Harbor, overlooking the battleships at the heart of America's seafaring power, the Commander of the Pacific Fleet tries to figure out how much danger he really faces. His intelligence unit has lost track of Japan's biggest aircraft carriers, but assumes they are resting in a port far away. The admiral thinks Pearl is too shallow for torpedoes, so he never puts up a barrier. As he frets, a Japanese spy is counting the warships in the harbor and reporting to Tokyo. There were false assumptions, and racist ones: assumptions that the Japanese aren't very good aviators and they don't have the nerve or the skill to attempt a strike so far from their home. There were misunderstandings, conflicting desires, painful choices. And there was a naval officer who, on his very first mission as captain of his very first ship, did exactly the right thing. His warning could have averted disaster, but his superiors reacted in too leisurely a fashion. Japanese planes arrived moments later. Twomey's telescoping of the twelve days leading to the attack unravels the crucial characters and moments, and produces an edge-of-your seat drama with fascinating details about America at this moment in its history. By the end, the reader understands how assumption is the root of disaster, and how sometimes a gamble pays off.
Image: In Vladivostok, the Cruiser Varyag in Golden Horn Bay.   In late July 1937, the Asiatic Fleet's commander-in-chief, Admiral Harry E. Yarnell, took his flagship, the heavy cruiser Augusta (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Augusta_(CA-31)) , to the Soviet Union's main naval base in the Pacific, Vladivostok, along with four of the fleet's destroyers. The visit, urged by the Soviet government, was an attempt to display solidarity between the Soviet Union and the United States in the face of increasingly aggressive Japanese behavior in China and along the border between the Soviet Union and the Japanese puppet state of Manchu-kuo in Manchuria. The visit was unsuccessful in deterring further Japanese military operations in either area.Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack, by Steve Twomey (https://www.amazon.com/Steve-Twomey/e/B01M9JM75R/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Holter Graham (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Holter+Graham) as narrator.  Simon & Schuster Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Simon+%26+Schuster+Audio) (Publisher).  Audible Audiobook – Unabridgedhttps://www.amazon.com/Countdown-Pearl-Harbor-Twelve-Attack/dp/B01M4KTL6P/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=steve+Twomey+countdown&qid=1575849535&s=audible&sr=1-1A fascinating look at the twelve days leading up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor—the warnings, clues and missteps—by a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. In Washington, D.C., in late November 1941, admirals compose the most ominous message in Naval history to warn Hawaii of possible danger, but they write it too vaguely. They think precautions are being taken, but never check to see if they are. A key intelligence officer wants more warnings sent, but he is on the losing end of a bureaucratic battle and can't get the message out. American sleuths have pierced Japan's most vital diplomatic code, and Washington believes it has a window on the enemy's soul—but it does not. In a small office at Pearl Harbor, overlooking the battleships at the heart of America's seafaring power, the Commander of the Pacific Fleet tries to figure out how much danger he really faces. His intelligence unit has lost track of Japan's biggest aircraft carriers, but assumes they are resting in a port far away. The admiral thinks Pearl is too shallow for torpedoes, so he never puts up a barrier. As he frets, a Japanese spy is counting the warships in the harbor and reporting to Tokyo. There were false assumptions, and racist ones: assumptions that the Japanese aren't very good aviators and they don't have the nerve or the skill to attempt a strike so far from their home. There were misunderstandings, conflicting desires, painful choices. And there was a naval officer who, on his very first mission as captain of his very first ship, did exactly the right thing. His warning could have averted disaster, but his superiors reacted in too leisurely a fashion. Japanese planes arrived moments later. Twomey's telescoping of the twelve days leading to the attack unravels the crucial characters and moments, and produces an edge-of-your seat drama with fascinating details about America at this moment in its history. By the end, the reader understands how assumption is the root of disaster, and how sometimes a gamble pays off.
Image: Photograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island shortly after the beginning of the Pearl Harbor attack. View looks about east, with the supply depot, submarine base and fuel tank farm in the right center distance. A torpedo has just hit USS West Virginia on the far side of Ford Island (center). Other battleships moored nearby are (from left): Nevada, Arizona, Tennessee (inboard of West Virginia), Oklahoma (torpedoed and listing) alongside Maryland, and California. On the near side of Ford Island, to the left, are the light cruisers Detroit and Raleigh, the target and training ship Utah and the seaplane tender Tangier. Raleigh and Utah have been torpedoed, and Utah is listing sharply to port. Japanese planes are visible in the right center (over Ford Island) and over the Navy Yard at right. U.S. Navy planes on the seaplane ramp are on fire. Japanese writing in the lower right states that the photograph was reproduced by authorization of the Navy Ministry.Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack, by Steve Twomey (https://www.amazon.com/Steve-Twomey/e/B01M9JM75R/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Holter Graham (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Holter+Graham) as narrator.  Simon & Schuster Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Simon+%26+Schuster+Audio) (Publisher).  Audible Audiobook – Unabridgedhttps://www.amazon.com/Countdown-Pearl-Harbor-Twelve-Attack/dp/B01M4KTL6P/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=steve+Twomey+countdown&qid=1575849535&s=audible&sr=1-1A fascinating look at the twelve days leading up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor—the warnings, clues and missteps—by a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. In Washington, D.C., in late November 1941, admirals compose the most ominous message in Naval history to warn Hawaii of possible danger, but they write it too vaguely. They think precautions are being taken, but never check to see if they are. A key intelligence officer wants more warnings sent, but he is on the losing end of a bureaucratic battle and can't get the message out. American sleuths have pierced Japan's most vital diplomatic code, and Washington believes it has a window on the enemy's soul—but it does not. In a small office at Pearl Harbor, overlooking the battleships at the heart of America's seafaring power, the Commander of the Pacific Fleet tries to figure out how much danger he really faces. His intelligence unit has lost track of Japan's biggest aircraft carriers, but assumes they are resting in a port far away. The admiral thinks Pearl is too shallow for torpedoes, so he never puts up a barrier. As he frets, a Japanese spy is counting the warships in the harbor and reporting to Tokyo. There were false assumptions, and racist ones: assumptions that the Japanese aren't very good aviators and they don't have the nerve or the skill to attempt a strike so far from their home. There were misunderstandings, conflicting desires, painful choices. And there was a naval officer who, on his very first mission as captain of his very first ship, did exactly the right thing. His warning could have averted disaster, but his superiors reacted in too leisurely a fashion. Japanese planes arrived moments later. Twomey's telescoping of the twelve days leading to the attack unravels the crucial characters and moments, and produces an edge-of-your seat drama with fascinating details about America at this moment in its history. By the end, the reader understands how assumption is the root of disaster, and how sometimes a gamble pays off.
Image:  USS Bremerton (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Bremerton_(SSN-698)) , USS Louisville (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Louisville_(SSN-724)) and USS Cheyenne (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Cheyenne_(SSN-773)) at the submarine base, in April 2018Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack, by Steve Twomey (https://www.amazon.com/Steve-Twomey/e/B01M9JM75R/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Holter Graham (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Holter+Graham) as narrator.  Simon & Schuster Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Simon+%26+Schuster+Audio) (Publisher).  Audible Audiobook – Unabridgedhttps://www.amazon.com/Countdown-Pearl-Harbor-Twelve-Attack/dp/B01M4KTL6P/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=steve+Twomey+countdown&qid=1575849535&s=audible&sr=1-1A fascinating look at the twelve days leading up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor—the warnings, clues and missteps—by a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. In Washington, D.C., in late November 1941, admirals compose the most ominous message in Naval history to warn Hawaii of possible danger, but they write it too vaguely. They think precautions are being taken, but never check to see if they are. A key intelligence officer wants more warnings sent, but he is on the losing end of a bureaucratic battle and can't get the message out. American sleuths have pierced Japan's most vital diplomatic code, and Washington believes it has a window on the enemy's soul—but it does not. In a small office at Pearl Harbor, overlooking the battleships at the heart of America's seafaring power, the Commander of the Pacific Fleet tries to figure out how much danger he really faces. His intelligence unit has lost track of Japan's biggest aircraft carriers, but assumes they are resting in a port far away. The admiral thinks Pearl is too shallow for torpedoes, so he never puts up a barrier. As he frets, a Japanese spy is counting the warships in the harbor and reporting to Tokyo. There were false assumptions, and racist ones: assumptions that the Japanese aren't very good aviators and they don't have the nerve or the skill to attempt a strike so far from their home. There were misunderstandings, conflicting desires, painful choices. And there was a naval officer who, on his very first mission as captain of his very first ship, did exactly the right thing. His warning could have averted disaster, but his superiors reacted in too leisurely a fashion. Japanese planes arrived moments later. Twomey's telescoping of the twelve days leading to the attack unravels the crucial characters and moments, and produces an edge-of-your seat drama with fascinating details about America at this moment in its history. By the end, the reader understands how assumption is the root of disaster, and how sometimes a gamble pays off.
Image:   Emperor Hirohito.  Public domainJapan 1941: Countdown to Infamy, by Eri Hotta (https://www.amazon.com/Eri-Hotta/e/B001KD4YNA/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Laural Merlington (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Laural+Merlington) as narrator. Tantor Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Tantor+Audio) is publisher. https://www.amazon.com/Japan-1941-Countdown-to-Infamy/dp/B00FW49PNM/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, argues Eri Hotta, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a conflict they were bound to lose. Availing herself of rarely consulted material, Hotta poses essential questions overlooked by historians in the seventy years since: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens in harm's way? Why did they make a decision that was doomed from the start? Introducing us to the doubters, bluffers, and schemers who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a Japan never before glimpsed—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, blinded by traditional notions of pride and honor, nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable...  ..  ..On 4 September 1941, the Japanese Cabinet (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabinet_of_Japan) met to consider war plans prepared by Imperial General Headquarters (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_General_Headquarters) and decided that:Our Empire (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empire_of_Japan) , for the purpose of self-defence and self-preservation, will complete preparations for war ... [and is] ... resolved to go to war with the United States (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) , Great Britain (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom) , and the French (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vichy_France) if necessary. Our Empire will concurrently take all possible diplomatic measures vis-à-vis the United States and Great Britain, and thereby endeavor to obtain our objectives ... In the event that there is no prospect of our demands being met by the first ten days of October through the diplomatic negotiations mentioned above, we will immediately decide to commence hostilities against the United States, Britain and France.The objectives to be obtained were clearly defined: a free hand to continue with the conquest of China and Southeast Asia, no increase in US or British military forces in the region, and cooperation by the West "in the acquisition of goods needed by our Empire."
Image:  Hideki Tojo.  This image is a work of a U.S. Army soldier or employee, taken or made as part of that person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy, by Eri Hotta (https://www.amazon.com/Eri-Hotta/e/B001KD4YNA/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Laural Merlington (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Laural+Merlington) as narrator. Tantor Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Tantor+Audio) is publisher. https://www.amazon.com/Japan-1941-Countdown-to-Infamy/dp/B00FW49PNM/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, argues Eri Hotta, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a conflict they were bound to lose. Availing herself of rarely consulted material, Hotta poses essential questions overlooked by historians in the seventy years since: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens in harm's way? Why did they make a decision that was doomed from the start? Introducing us to the doubters, bluffers, and schemers who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a Japan never before glimpsed—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, blinded by traditional notions of pride and honor, nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable.
Image:  Japanese soldiers creeping in front of wrecked Soviet tanks, Nomonhan (Battle of Khalkhin Gol). Public domain.Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy, by Eri Hotta (https://www.amazon.com/Eri-Hotta/e/B001KD4YNA/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Laural Merlington (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Laural+Merlington) as narrator. Tantor Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Tantor+Audio) is publisher. https://www.amazon.com/Japan-1941-Countdown-to-Infamy/dp/B00FW49PNM/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, argues Eri Hotta, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a conflict they were bound to lose. Availing herself of rarely consulted material, Hotta poses essential questions overlooked by historians in the seventy years since: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens in harm's way? Why did they make a decision that was doomed from the start? Introducing us to the doubters, bluffers, and schemers who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a Japan never before glimpsed—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, blinded by traditional notions of pride and honor, nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable.
Image: View of Edo (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edo) , from a 17th-century screen painting.Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy, by Eri Hotta (https://www.amazon.com/Eri-Hotta/e/B001KD4YNA/ref=dp_byline_cont_all_1) ; with Laural Merlington (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_2?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Laural+Merlington) as narrator. Tantor Audio (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_all_3?ie=UTF8&search-alias=&field-keywords=Tantor+Audio) is publisher. https://www.amazon.com/Japan-1941-Countdown-to-Infamy/dp/B00FW49PNM/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, argues Eri Hotta, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a conflict they were bound to lose. Availing herself of rarely consulted material, Hotta poses essential questions overlooked by historians in the seventy years since: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens in harm's way? Why did they make a decision that was doomed from the start? Introducing us to the doubters, bluffers, and schemers who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a Japan never before glimpsed—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, blinded by traditional notions of pride and honor, nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable..
Photo: Wyndham Lewis  (1882–1957)   TitleA Canadian Gun-pitObject typepaintingDate1918Mediumoil on canvasDimensionsHeight: 363.2 cm (11.9 ft); Width: 304.8 cm (10 ft) CollectionNational Gallery of Canada   Accession number8356Object history1921: transferred to National Art Gallery from Canadian War Memorials collectionExhibition historyCanada War Memorials Exhibition, Burlington House, London, January 1919–February 1919Referencesdescribed at URL:  https://www.gallery.ca/collection/artwork/a-canadian-gun-pitdescribed at URL:  https://www.gallery.ca/collection/artwork/a-canadian-gun-pit-0Source/Photographerhttps://www.gallery.ca/collection/artwork/a-canadian-gun-pitPermission(Reusing this file)First published in Canada in 1919 (PD in that country) and prior to 1923 (PD in the US).This Canadian work is in the public domain in Canada because its copyright has expired due to one of the following:1. it was subject to Crown copyright and was first published more than 50 years ago, orit was not subject to Crown copyright, and2. it is a photograph that was created prior to January 1, 1949, or3. the creator died more than 50 years ago.http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowSydney and Violet: 1 of 4: Their Life with T.S. Eliot, Proust, Joyce and the Excruciatingly Irascible Wyndham Lewis Hardcover – Deckle Edge, September 3, 2013 by Stephen Klaidman (https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-Klaidman/e/B001IQUJYC/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1)   (Author)https://www.amazon.com/Sydney-Violet-Excruciatingly-Irascible-Wyndham/dp/0385534094/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Stephen+Klaidman+sydney+Violet&qid=1575767420&s=books&sr=1-1"I write primarily to pay homage to a beloved friend, but also in the hope that some future chronicler of the history of art and letters in our time may give to Sydney and Violet Schiff the place which is their due."—T. S. Eliot, in a letter appended to Violet Schiff's obituary, Times of London, July 9, 1962Largely forgotten today, Sydney and Violet Schiff were ubiquitous, almost Zelig-like figures in the most important literary movement of the twentieth century. Their friendships among the elite of the Modernist writers were remarkable, and their extensive correspondence with T. S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield, Proust, and many others strongly suggests both intimacy and intellectual equality. Leading critics of the day considered Sydney, writing as Stephen Hudson, to be in the same literary league as Joyce, Eliot, and D. H. Lawrence. As for Violet, she was a talented musician who nurtured Sydney's literary efforts and was among the first in England to recognize Proust's genius and spread the word. Sydney and Violet tells the story of how the Schiffs, despite their commercial and Jewish origins, won acceptance in the snobbish, anti-Semitic, literary world of early twentieth-century England, and brings to life a full panoply of extravagant personalities: Proust, Joyce, Picasso, Mansfield, Wyndham Lewis, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, and many more. A highly personal, anecdote-filled account of the social and intellectual history of the Modernist movement, Sydney and Violet also examines what divides the literary survivors from the victims of taste and time.
Photo: English: Drawing of Aldous Huxley.Date1929SourceAldous Huxley: A Man of Two Minds by William Leon Smyser. The Sphere Newspaper. October 12, 1929.AuthorDrawing by Eric Pape (1870-1938).This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or fewer.http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowSydney and Violet: 2 of 4: Their Life with T.S. Eliot, Proust, Joyce and the Excruciatingly Irascible Wyndham Lewis Hardcover – Deckle Edge, September 3, 2013 by Stephen Klaidman (https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-Klaidman/e/B001IQUJYC/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1)   (Author)https://www.amazon.com/Sydney-Violet-Excruciatingly-Irascible-Wyndham/dp/0385534094/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Stephen+Klaidman+sydney+Violet&qid=1575767420&s=books&sr=1-1"I write primarily to pay homage to a beloved friend, but also in the hope that some future chronicler of the history of art and letters in our time may give to Sydney and Violet Schiff the place which is their due."—T. S. Eliot, in a letter appended to Violet Schiff's obituary, Times of London, July 9, 1962Largely forgotten today, Sydney and Violet Schiff were ubiquitous, almost Zelig-like figures in the most important literary movement of the twentieth century. Their friendships among the elite of the Modernist writers were remarkable, and their extensive correspondence with T. S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield, Proust, and many others strongly suggests both intimacy and intellectual equality. Leading critics of the day considered Sydney, writing as Stephen Hudson, to be in the same literary league as Joyce, Eliot, and D. H. Lawrence. As for Violet, she was a talented musician who nurtured Sydney's literary efforts and was among the first in England to recognize Proust's genius and spread the word. Sydney and Violet tells the story of how the Schiffs, despite their commercial and Jewish origins, won acceptance in the snobbish, anti-Semitic, literary world of early twentieth-century England, and brings to life a full panoply of extravagant personalities: Proust, Joyce, Picasso, Mansfield, Wyndham Lewis, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, and many more. A highly personal, anecdote-filled account of the social and intellectual history of the Modernist movement, Sydney and Violet also examines what divides the literary survivors from the victims of taste and time.
Photo: Fiat is an Italian make, but this postcard was mailed by their agent in Paris in 1905. Advertising postcard.Fecha20 de noviembre de 2011, 15:22Fuente1905 Fiat 24-32 HP TonneauAutorAlden JewellLicenciaEste archivo está disponible bajo la licencia Creative Commons Atribución 2.0 Genérica.Eres libre:de compartir – de copiar, distribuir y transmitir el trabajode remezclar – de adaptar el trabajoBajo las siguientes condiciones:atribución – Debes otorgar el crédito correspondiente, proporcionar un enlace a la licencia e indicar si realizaste algún cambio. Puedes hacerlo de cualquier manera razonable pero no de manera que sugiera que el licenciante te respalda a ti o al uso que hagas del trabajo.Esta imagen, originalmente subida a Flickr, fue revisada el November 21, 2011 por el administrador o revisor File Upload Bot (Magnus Manske), quien comprobó que el archivo se encontraba disponible en Flickr bajo la licencia nombrada en dicha fecha.Este archivo está en el dominio público en los Estados Unidos. Esto se aplica a los trabajos de Estados Unidos donde ha expirado el copyright, a menudo porque su primera publicación ocurrió antes del 1 de enero de 1924. Véase esta página para explicación adicional.________________________________Esta imagen puede estar protegida fuera de los Estados Unidos —especialmente en Canadá, China (excepto Hong-Kong, Macao, o el área de Taiwán), Alemania o Suiza—. El creador y el año de publicación son información esencial y deben ser proporcionados. Véase Wikipedia:Copyright para más detalles.http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowSydney and Violet: 3 of 4: Their Life with T.S. Eliot, Proust, Joyce and the Excruciatingly Irascible Wyndham Lewis Hardcover – Deckle Edge, September 3, 2013 by Stephen Klaidman (https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-Klaidman/e/B001IQUJYC/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1)   (Author)https://www.amazon.com/Sydney-Violet-Excruciatingly-Irascible-Wyndham/dp/0385534094/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Stephen+Klaidman+sydney+Violet&qid=1575767420&s=books&sr=1-1"I write primarily to pay homage to a beloved friend, but also in the hope that some future chronicler of the history of art and letters in our time may give to Sydney and Violet Schiff the place which is their due."—T. S. Eliot, in a letter appended to Violet Schiff's obituary, Times of London, July 9, 1962Largely forgotten today, Sydney and Violet Schiff were ubiquitous, almost Zelig-like figures in the most important literary movement of the twentieth century. Their friendships among the elite of the Modernist writers were remarkable, and their extensive correspondence with T. S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield, Proust, and many others strongly suggests both intimacy and intellectual equality. Leading critics of the day considered Sydney, writing as Stephen Hudson, to be in the same literary league as Joyce, Eliot, and D. H. Lawrence. As for Violet, she was a talented musician who nurtured Sydney's literary efforts and was among the first in England to recognize Proust's genius and spread the word. Sydney and Violet tells the story of how the Schiffs, despite their commercial and Jewish origins, won acceptance in the snobbish, anti-Semitic, literary world of early twentieth-century England, and brings to life a full panoply of extravagant personalities: Proust, Joyce, Picasso, Mansfield, Wyndham Lewis, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, and many more. A highly personal, anecdote-filled account of the social and intellectual history of the Modernist movement, Sydney and Violet also examines what divides the literary survivors from the victims of taste and time.
Photo: Français : La Musique à la Mi-Carême à Paris 1905.Date1905SourceCarte-postale d'époqueAuthorC. L. C.Permission(Reusing this file)Domaine publicThis work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or fewer.http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowSydney and Violet: 4 of 4: Their Life with T.S. Eliot, Proust, Joyce and the Excruciatingly Irascible Wyndham Lewis Hardcover – Deckle Edge, September 3, 2013 by Stephen Klaidman (https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-Klaidman/e/B001IQUJYC/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1)   (Author)https://www.amazon.com/Sydney-Violet-Excruciatingly-Irascible-Wyndham/dp/0385534094/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Stephen+Klaidman+sydney+Violet&qid=1575767420&s=books&sr=1-1"I write primarily to pay homage to a beloved friend, but also in the hope that some future chronicler of the history of art and letters in our time may give to Sydney and Violet Schiff the place which is their due."—T. S. Eliot, in a letter appended to Violet Schiff's obituary, Times of London, July 9, 1962Largely forgotten today, Sydney and Violet Schiff were ubiquitous, almost Zelig-like figures in the most important literary movement of the twentieth century. Their friendships among the elite of the Modernist writers were remarkable, and their extensive correspondence with T. S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield, Proust, and many others strongly suggests both intimacy and intellectual equality. Leading critics of the day considered Sydney, writing as Stephen Hudson, to be in the same literary league as Joyce, Eliot, and D. H. Lawrence. As for Violet, she was a talented musician who nurtured Sydney's literary efforts and was among the first in England to recognize Proust's genius and spread the word. Sydney and Violet tells the story of how the Schiffs, despite their commercial and Jewish origins, won acceptance in the snobbish, anti-Semitic, literary world of early twentieth-century England, and brings to life a full panoply of extravagant personalities: Proust, Joyce, Picasso, Mansfield, Wyndham Lewis, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, and many more. A highly personal, anecdote-filled account of the social and intellectual history of the Modernist movement, Sydney and Violet also examines what divides the literary survivors from the victims of taste and time.
Photo: Uranus: NASA Voyager 2http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowThe Known Unknowns of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune: 1 of 2: Uranus sideways. Ken Croswell @SkyandTelescope
Photo: Neptune NASA Voyager 2http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowThe Known Unknowns of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune: 2 of 2: Neptune's Rogue Moon Triton. Ken Croswell @SkyandTelescope
Photo: Inauguration of President Lincoln. U.S. Capitol dome under construction in background. Print on salted paper.Date | 4 March 1861Source | Library of Congress CALL NUMBER: LOT 12251, v. 2 [P&P]Author | UnknownLicensinghttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowNew American Civil War: 1 of 2: Congress spies on Congress. Michael Vlahos  @JHUWorldCongresshttps://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/dec/7/devin-nunes-definitely-taking-legal-action-after-p/
Photo: UnknownTitle | Inauguration of Mr. Lincoln, March 4, 1861Description | English: Photograph shows participants and crowd at the first inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln, at the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. Lincoln is standing under the wood canopy, at the front, midway between the left and center posts. His face is in shadow but the white shirt front is visible. (Source: Ostendorf, p. 87) "A distant photograph from a special platform by an unknown photographer, in front of the Capitol, Washington, D.C., afternoon of March 4, 1861. 'A small camera was directly in front of Mr. Lincoln,' reported a newspaper, 'another at a distance of a hundred yards, and a third of huge dimensions on the right ... The three photographers present had plenty of time to take pictures, yet only the distant views have survived." (Source: Ostendorf, p. 86-87) The 1861 inauguration is believed to be the first ever photographed, and some sources credit it to Scottish photographer, Alexander Gardner[1] (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Abraham_Lincoln_inauguration_1861.jpg#cite_note-1)Date | Taken on 4 March 1861Medium | 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowNew American Civil War: 2 of 2: Congress spies on Congress. Michael Vlahos  @JHUWorldCongresshttps://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/dec/7/devin-nunes-definitely-taking-legal-action-after-p/
Photo: The Golden Gate and Mount Tamalpais in 1900 — from Telegraph Hill in San Francisco, California.Date1900SourceThis image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs divisionunder the digital ID ppmsca.18302.This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.________________________________العربية | беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎ | čeština | Deutsch | English | español | فارسی | suomi | français | עברית | magyar | italiano | lietuvių | македонски | മലയാളം | Nederlands | polski | português | português do Brasil | русский | sicilianu | slovenčina | slovenščina | Türkçe | українська | 中文 | 中文(简体)‎ | 中文(繁體)‎ | +/−Restoration by trialsanderrors: The Golden Gate and Mount Tamalpais from Telegraph Hill, San Francisco Bay Area, California, 1900AuthorDetroit Publishing Co.Camera location37° 48′ 10.68″ N, 122° 24′ 22.25″ W View this and other nearby images on: OpenStreetMap - Google EarthLicensing[edit]This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1924.________________________________ Public domain works must be out of copyright in both the United States and in the source country of the work in order to be hosted on the Commons. If the work is not a U.S. work, the file must have an additional copyright tag indicating the copyright status in the source country.http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowPacific Watch: 10,000 drug related deaths in the Bay Areas while homeless encampments thrive. Jeff Bliss.https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1/#search/jeff.bliss1%40gmail.com/WhctKJVjNdzXwBBsJfhJqPWpmPHSWRjTLMLBsffWtZBMPSXxBXzHmCpxsVwRqGcFGbDWJLL
Photo: 1900-02 Fessenden made his first radio broadcast from his lab in Brant Rock, MA on 24 December 1906 (Courtesy of the North Carolina State Archives) ITU Pictures (https://www.flickr.com/photos/itupictures/)http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowRecession Search: November Jobs report sensation. @McTagueJim, author "Follow the Leader."https://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2019/12/06/newsletter-special-edition-now-thats-a-jobs-report/
Photo: venska: Hästspårvagn vid Berzelii park.Date | circa 1900Source | Horse drawn tram in Stockholm around 1900 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/stockholmtransportmuseum_commons/6052315175/)Author | Unknown, Stockholm Transport Museum (https://www.flickr.com/people/62173425@N02)Camera location | 59° 19′ 58.13″ N, 18° 04′ 32.93″ E (https://tools.wmflabs.org/geohack/geohack.php?pagename=File:Horse_drawn_tram_in_Stockholm_c._1900.jpg&params=059.332814_N_0018.075814_E_globe:Earth_type:camera_source:Flickr&language=en)   | View this and other nearby images on: OpenStreetMap (https://tools.wmflabs.org/wiwosm/osm-on-ol/commons-on-osm.php?zoom=16&lat=059.332814&lon=0018.075814) - Google Earth (https://tools.wmflabs.org/geocommons/earth.kml?latdegdec=059.332814&londegdec=0018.075814&scale=10000&commons=1)http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowSpaceX the workhorse and the race horse. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.comhttps://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/spacex-successfully-launches-cargo-dragon-to-iss/
Photo: These are images of the four candidate sample collection sites on asteroid Bennu: Nightingale, Kingfisher, Osprey and Sandpiper. One of these four sites will ultimately be the location on which NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will touch down to collect a sample. Credit: NASA/Goddard/University of Arizonahttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesTwitter: @BatchelorShowTouching down on perilous Bennu. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.comhttps://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/osiris-rex-completes-reconnaissance-of-four-candidate-sample-sites/https://www.asteroidmission.org/?latest-news=nasas-osiris-rex-in-the-midst-of-site-selection
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Comments (22)

Ryan Kirschner (RyanKirschnerImages)

The existence of God is not a scientific issue, it is a philosophical one. It is part of the study of metaphysics. You don't "calculate" or "run an experiment" to determine if God exists. You apply the art of logic to the question. The fact is that existence exists, and only existence exists. All of existence can be tied back to sensory perception. Fabricating another realm that is outside the realm of existence and cannot be gleaned from sensory perception is a contradiction, and contradictions can't exist.

Aug 21st
Reply (1)

sixfeetfree

Wrong title. This podcast is John Gordon's book, Fighting for MacArthur.

May 12th
Reply

Scott Ehrman

Don't forget operation Preying Mantiss

Mar 21st
Reply

Juan Restrepo

yes, folks love to move from NY and California to places like North Carolina, Virginia and Texas... but then they screw it up and vote Democrat. then those states turn into the garbage they left initially.

Jan 5th
Reply (3)

Juan Restrepo

Richard Epstein is brilliant.

Nov 5th
Reply

Tom Shea

it is interesting that so close to the midterms, you hear no thing about this connection

Oct 18th
Reply

Tom Shea

john.. I am a new convert to your excellent podcast. thank you.

Oct 18th
Reply

Jim Abbett

This guest was way off base about automation creating higher wages. You automate tasks so you don't need skilled workers. Lower skilled workers = lower wages.

Oct 16th
Reply

Sean

I enjoy The John Batchelor Show but I hate the bombarded of so many individual short segmented pieces.

Sep 9th
Reply

Juan Restrepo

I really enjoy Bob Zimmerman on the John Batchelor show.

Sep 2nd
Reply

Ami Gewolb

John batchelor

Jul 20th
Reply

Juan Restrepo

excellent explanation of this issue

Mar 31st
Reply

Juan Restrepo

Eerily true...great show.

Mar 31st
Reply

George Mednick

m

Mar 31st
Reply

Ron Lewenberg

Thank you for these two segments. They really spoke to me.All of my grandparents and father are survivors of the Shoah, and my father's family were from Galicia.

Feb 3rd
Reply

Juan Restrepo

Thank you for this 4 part interview John. Colonel Reeder is a true American hero.

Oct 20th
Reply

Juan Restrepo

scary, seems like the US and China will have a come to Jesus moment. I hope our military is ready!

Oct 19th
Reply

Juan Restrepo

John Batchelor is awesome! I've been listening to his show for years now.

Oct 12th
Reply
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