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The John Batchelor Show is a breaking-news program that focusses on global politics, economics, war-fighting, hard sciences, space exploration, literature and whimsy. Four hours a night, seven days a week; most rigorous news analysis in the New World; followed daily in 192 countries.
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Image:  Truman was so widely expected to lose the 1948 election that the Chicago Tribune had printed papers with this erroneous headline when few returns were in. The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months that Changed the World, by A J Baime            “A. J. Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color.”—Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company   Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death. The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan and, finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War. No other president had ever faced so much in such a short period of time. The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during a tumultuous, history-making 120 days, when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher.  https://www.amazon.com/Accidental-President-Truman-Months-Changed-ebook/dp/B01MQVT9TG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=accidental+president+baime&qid=1600564421&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Image:  Truman announces Japan's surrender, August 14, 1945 The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months that Changed the World, by A J Baime            “A. J. Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color.”—Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company   Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death. The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan and, finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War. No other president had ever faced so much in such a short period of time. The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during a tumultuous, history-making 120 days, when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher.  https://www.amazon.com/Accidental-President-Truman-Months-Changed-ebook/dp/B01MQVT9TG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=accidental+president+baime&qid=1600564421&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Image:  Two aerial photos of atomic bomb mushroom clouds, over two Japanese cities in 1945 The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months that Changed the World, by A J Baime            “A. J. Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color.”—Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company   Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death. The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan and, finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War. No other president had ever faced so much in such a short period of time. The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during a tumultuous, history-making 120 days, when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher.  https://www.amazon.com/Accidental-President-Truman-Months-Changed-ebook/dp/B01MQVT9TG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=accidental+president+baime&qid=1600564421&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Image:   Harry and Bess Truman on their wedding day, June 28, 1919 The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months that Changed the World, by A J Baime            “A. J. Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color.”—Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company   Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death. The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan and, finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War. No other president had ever faced so much in such a short period of time. The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during a tumultuous, history-making 120 days, when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher.  https://www.amazon.com/Accidental-President-Truman-Months-Changed-ebook/dp/B01MQVT9TG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=accidental+president+baime&qid=1600564421&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Image:  Truman in uniform, ca. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circa) 1918 The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months that Changed the World, by A J Baime            “A. J. Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color.”—Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company   Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death. The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan and, finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War. No other president had ever faced so much in such a short period of time. The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during a tumultuous, history-making 120 days, when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher.  https://www.amazon.com/Accidental-President-Truman-Months-Changed-ebook/dp/B01MQVT9TG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=accidental+president+baime&qid=1600564421&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Image:  Truman at age 13 in 1897 The Accidental President: Harry S. Truman and the Four Months that Changed the World, by A J Baime            “A. J. Baime is a master. His reporting and storytelling are woven to hypnotic effect. This is history and humanity in lush, vivid color.”—Doug Stanton, author of The Odyssey of Echo Company   Heroes are often defined as ordinary characters who get pushed into extraordinary circumstances and, through courage and a dash of luck, cement their place in history. Chosen as FDR’s fourth-term vice president for his well-praised work ethic, good judgment, and lack of enemies, Harry S. Truman was the prototypical ordinary man. That is, until he was shockingly thrust in over his head after FDR’s sudden death. The first four months of Truman’s administration saw the founding of the United Nations, the fall of Berlin, victory at Okinawa, firebombings in Tokyo, the first atomic explosion, the Nazi surrender, the liberation of concentration camps, the mass starvation in Europe, the Potsdam Conference, the controversial decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the surrender of imperial Japan and, finally, the end of World War II and the rise of the Cold War. No other president had ever faced so much in such a short period of time. The Accidental President escorts readers into the situation room with Truman during a tumultuous, history-making 120 days, when the stakes were high and the challenges even higher.  https://www.amazon.com/Accidental-President-Truman-Months-Changed-ebook/dp/B01MQVT9TG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=accidental+president+baime&qid=1600564421&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Image:  Nixon displays the V-for-victory sign (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_sign) as he departs the White House after resigning, August 9, 1974 The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose from Defeat to Create the New Majority, by Patrick J. Buchanan After suffering stinging defeats in the 1960 presidential election against John F. Kennedy, and in the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's career was declared dead by Washington press and politicians alike. Yet on January 20, 1969, just six years after he had said his political life was over, Nixon would stand taking the oath of office as 37th President of the United States. How did Richard Nixon resurrect a ruined career and reunite a shattered and fractured Republican Party to capture the White House?    In The Greatest Comeback, Patrick J. Buchanan—who, beginning in January 1966, served as one of two staff members to Nixon, and would become a senior advisor in the White House after 1968—gives a firsthand account of those crucial years in which Nixon reversed his political fortunes during a decade marked by civil rights protests; social revolution; the Vietnam War; the assassinations of JFK, RFK, and Martin Luther King; urban riots; campus anarchy, and the rise of the New Left. Using over 1,000 of his own personal memos to Nixon, with Nixon’s scribbled replies back, Buchanan gives readers an insider’s view as Nixon gathers the warring factions of the Republican party—from the conservative base of Barry Goldwater to the liberal wing of Nelson Rockefeller and George Romney, to the New Right legions of an ascendant Ronald Reagan—into the victorious coalition that won him the White House. How Richard Nixon united the party behind him may offer insights into how the Republican Party today can bring together its warring factions. The Greatest Comeback is an intimate portrayal of the 37th President and a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of one of the most remarkable American political stories of the 20th century.
Image:   A photo of the Watergate Complex taken from a DC-9-80 inbound to Washington National Airport on January 8, 2006. The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose from Defeat to Create the New Majority, by Patrick J. Buchanan After suffering stinging defeats in the 1960 presidential election against John F. Kennedy, and in the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's career was declared dead by Washington press and politicians alike. Yet on January 20, 1969, just six years after he had said his political life was over, Nixon would stand taking the oath of office as 37th President of the United States. How did Richard Nixon resurrect a ruined career and reunite a shattered and fractured Republican Party to capture the White House?    In The Greatest Comeback, Patrick J. Buchanan—who, beginning in January 1966, served as one of two staff members to Nixon, and would become a senior advisor in the White House after 1968—gives a firsthand account of those crucial years in which Nixon reversed his political fortunes during a decade marked by civil rights protests; social revolution; the Vietnam War; the assassinations of JFK, RFK, and Martin Luther King; urban riots; campus anarchy, and the rise of the New Left. Using over 1,000 of his own personal memos to Nixon, with Nixon’s scribbled replies back, Buchanan gives readers an insider’s view as Nixon gathers the warring factions of the Republican party—from the conservative base of Barry Goldwater to the liberal wing of Nelson Rockefeller and George Romney, to the New Right legions of an ascendant Ronald Reagan—into the victorious coalition that won him the White House. How Richard Nixon united the party behind him may offer insights into how the Republican Party today can bring together its warring factions. The Greatest Comeback is an intimate portrayal of the 37th President and a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of one of the most remarkable American political stories of the 20th century. ,,  ,,  ,,
Image:  Lieutenant Commander Richard Nixon, United States Navy (circa 1945) The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose from Defeat to Create the New Majority, by Patrick J. Buchanan After suffering stinging defeats in the 1960 presidential election against John F. Kennedy, and in the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's career was declared dead by Washington press and politicians alike. Yet on January 20, 1969, just six years after he had said his political life was over, Nixon would stand taking the oath of office as 37th President of the United States. How did Richard Nixon resurrect a ruined career and reunite a shattered and fractured Republican Party to capture the White House?    In The Greatest Comeback, Patrick J. Buchanan—who, beginning in January 1966, served as one of two staff members to Nixon, and would become a senior advisor in the White House after 1968—gives a firsthand account of those crucial years in which Nixon reversed his political fortunes during a decade marked by civil rights protests; social revolution; the Vietnam War; the assassinations of JFK, RFK, and Martin Luther King; urban riots; campus anarchy, and the rise of the New Left. Using over 1,000 of his own personal memos to Nixon, with Nixon’s scribbled replies back, Buchanan gives readers an insider’s view as Nixon gathers the warring factions of the Republican party—from the conservative base of Barry Goldwater to the liberal wing of Nelson Rockefeller and George Romney, to the New Right legions of an ascendant Ronald Reagan—into the victorious coalition that won him the White House. How Richard Nixon united the party behind him may offer insights into how the Republican Party today can bring together its warring factions. The Greatest Comeback is an intimate portrayal of the 37th President and a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of one of the most remarkable American political stories of the 20th century.
Image:  Nixon (second from right) makes his newspaper debut in 1916, contributing five cents to a fund for war orphans. His brother Donald (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Nixon) is to his right. The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose from Defeat to Create the New Majority, by Patrick J. Buchanan After suffering stinging defeats in the 1960 presidential election against John F. Kennedy, and in the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's career was declared dead by Washington press and politicians alike. Yet on January 20, 1969, just six years after he had said his political life was over, Nixon would stand taking the oath of office as 37th President of the United States. How did Richard Nixon resurrect a ruined career and reunite a shattered and fractured Republican Party to capture the White House?    In The Greatest Comeback, Patrick J. Buchanan—who, beginning in January 1966, served as one of two staff members to Nixon, and would become a senior advisor in the White House after 1968—gives a firsthand account of those crucial years in which Nixon reversed his political fortunes during a decade marked by civil rights protests; social revolution; the Vietnam War; the assassinations of JFK, RFK, and Martin Luther King; urban riots; campus anarchy, and the rise of the New Left. Using over 1,000 of his own personal memos to Nixon, with Nixon’s scribbled replies back, Buchanan gives readers an insider’s view as Nixon gathers the warring factions of the Republican party—from the conservative base of Barry Goldwater to the liberal wing of Nelson Rockefeller and George Romney, to the New Right legions of an ascendant Ronald Reagan—into the victorious coalition that won him the White House. How Richard Nixon united the party behind him may offer insights into how the Republican Party today can bring together its warring factions. The Greatest Comeback is an intimate portrayal of the 37th President and a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of one of the most remarkable American political stories of the 20th century.
Photo:1948 Filmming of "On an Island with You," Anna Maria Island, Florida..Date: ca. 1948..General note: "On an Island with You," is a 1948 musical romantic comedy directed by Richard Thorpe. It starred Esther Williams, Peter Lawford, Ricardo Montalban, Cyd Charisse, and Kathryn Beaumont...Physical descrip: 1 transparency - col. - 4 x 5 in...Series Title: Joseph Janney Steinmetz Collection ( http://floridamemory.com/photographiccollection/collections/?id=49 ) ..Repository:  State  Library and Archives of Florida ( http://www.floridamemory.com/ ) , 500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL  32399-0250 USA. Contact: 850.245.6700. Archives@dos.myflorida.com   http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Parler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow Dewey Defeats Truman: 4of4: The 1948 Election and the Battle for America's Soul Kindle Editionby A. J. Baime (https://www.amazon.com/A-J-Baime/e/B001IXO0YK/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1)   (Author)  . Format: Kindle Edition https://www.amazon.com/Dewey-Defeats-Truman-Election-Americas-ebook/dp/B07T1FX76H/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=baime&qid=1600566052&s=digital-text&sr=1-2 On the eve of the 1948 election, America was a fractured country. Racism was rampant, foreign relations were fraught, and political parties were more divided than ever. Americans were certain that President Harry S. Truman’s political career was over. “The ballots haven’t been counted,” noted political columnist Fred Othman, “but there seems to be no further need for holding up an affectional farewell to Harry Truman.” Truman’s own staff did not believe he could win. Nor did his wife, Bess. The only man in the world confident that Truman would win was Mr. Truman himself. And win he did. 1948 was a fight for the soul of a nation. In Dewey Defeats Truman, A. J. Baime sheds light on one of the most action-packed six months in American history, as Truman not only triumphs, but oversees watershed events—the passing of the Marshall plan, the acknowledgement of Israel as a new state, the careful attention to the origins of the Cold War, and the first desegregation of the military.  Not only did Truman win the election, he succeeded in guiding his country forward at a critical time with high stakes and haunting parallels to the modern day.
Photo:1948 Local call number: JJS0007A ..Title: Brooklyn Dodgers spring training: Vero Beach, Florida..Date: March 1949..General note: The Brooklyn Dodgers were one of the first major league baseball teams to conduct spring training in Florida, establishing their operations at Vero Beach in 1948...Physical descrip: 1 photonegative - b&w - 60 mm...Series Title: Joseph Janney Steinmetz Collection ( http://floridamemory.com/photographiccollection/collections/?id=49 )   http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Parler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow Dewey Defeats Truman: 3of4: The 1948 Election and the Battle for America's Soul Kindle Editionby A. J. Baime (https://www.amazon.com/A-J-Baime/e/B001IXO0YK/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1)   (Author)  . Format: Kindle Edition https://www.amazon.com/Dewey-Defeats-Truman-Election-Americas-ebook/dp/B07T1FX76H/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=baime&qid=1600566052&s=digital-text&sr=1-2 On the eve of the 1948 election, America was a fractured country. Racism was rampant, foreign relations were fraught, and political parties were more divided than ever. Americans were certain that President Harry S. Truman’s political career was over. “The ballots haven’t been counted,” noted political columnist Fred Othman, “but there seems to be no further need for holding up an affectional farewell to Harry Truman.” Truman’s own staff did not believe he could win. Nor did his wife, Bess. The only man in the world confident that Truman would win was Mr. Truman himself. And win he did. 1948 was a fight for the soul of a nation. In Dewey Defeats Truman, A. J. Baime sheds light on one of the most action-packed six months in American history, as Truman not only triumphs, but oversees watershed events—the passing of the Marshall plan, the acknowledgement of Israel as a new state, the careful attention to the origins of the Cold War, and the first desegregation of the military.  Not only did Truman win the election, he succeeded in guiding his country forward at a critical time with high stakes and haunting parallels to the modern day.
Photo:1948 Persistent URL: floridamemory.com/items/show/53299 ( http://floridamemory.com/items/show/53299 ) ..Local call number: SP02408..Title: Unidentified men with the "Town Shopper" in San Diego, California..Date: 1948..Physical descrip: 1 photograph - b&w - 8 x 10 in...Series Title: Print Collections ( http://floridamemory.com/photographiccollection/collections/?id=37 ) ..Repository:  State  Library and Archives of Florida ( http://www.floridamemory.com/ ) .500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL, 32399-0250 USA, Contact: 850.245.6700, Archives@dos.myflorida.com   http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Parler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow Dewey Defeats Truman: 2of4: The 1948 Election and the Battle for America's Soul Kindle Editionby A. J. Baime (https://www.amazon.com/A-J-Baime/e/B001IXO0YK/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1)   (Author)  . Format: Kindle Edition https://www.amazon.com/Dewey-Defeats-Truman-Election-Americas-ebook/dp/B07T1FX76H/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=baime&qid=1600566052&s=digital-text&sr=1-2 On the eve of the 1948 election, America was a fractured country. Racism was rampant, foreign relations were fraught, and political parties were more divided than ever. Americans were certain that President Harry S. Truman’s political career was over. “The ballots haven’t been counted,” noted political columnist Fred Othman, “but there seems to be no further need for holding up an affectional farewell to Harry Truman.” Truman’s own staff did not believe he could win. Nor did his wife, Bess. The only man in the world confident that Truman would win was Mr. Truman himself. And win he did. 1948 was a fight for the soul of a nation. In Dewey Defeats Truman, A. J. Baime sheds light on one of the most action-packed six months in American history, as Truman not only triumphs, but oversees watershed events—the passing of the Marshall plan, the acknowledgement of Israel as a new state, the careful attention to the origins of the Cold War, and the first desegregation of the military.  Not only did Truman win the election, he succeeded in guiding his country forward at a critical time with high stakes and haunting parallels to the modern day.
Photo:1948 The Olympic Games 100 metres final at Wembley Stadium with Harrison Dillard of USA winning in 10.3 seconds. This equals the previous best Olympic performances of Eddie Tolan in 1932 and Jessie Owens in 1936. Dillard (b.1923) failed to qualify for the 110 metres hurdles, his speciality, at the Olympic trials but did qualify in third and last place for the 100 metres event. Dillard went on to qualify for the 110 metres hurdle event at the Olympics in Helsinki in 1952 and won gold.     ..Daily Herald Archive at the National Media Museum.....We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions of the original physical version of apply though; if you're unsure please visit the National Media Museum website ( http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/ ) ......For obtaining reproductions of selected images please go to the Science and Society Picture Library ( http://www.scienceandsociety.co.uk/ ) .   http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Parler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow Dewey Defeats Truman: 1of4: The 1948 Election and the Battle for America's Soul Kindle Editionby A. J. Baime (https://www.amazon.com/A-J-Baime/e/B001IXO0YK/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1)   (Author)  . Format: Kindle Edition https://www.amazon.com/Dewey-Defeats-Truman-Election-Americas-ebook/dp/B07T1FX76H/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=baime&qid=1600566052&s=digital-text&sr=1-2 On the eve of the 1948 election, America was a fractured country. Racism was rampant, foreign relations were fraught, and political parties were more divided than ever. Americans were certain that President Harry S. Truman’s political career was over. “The ballots haven’t been counted,” noted political columnist Fred Othman, “but there seems to be no further need for holding up an affectional farewell to Harry Truman.” Truman’s own staff did not believe he could win. Nor did his wife, Bess. The only man in the world confident that Truman would win was Mr. Truman himself. And win he did. 1948 was a fight for the soul of a nation. In Dewey Defeats Truman, A. J. Baime sheds light on one of the most action-packed six months in American history, as Truman not only triumphs, but oversees watershed events—the passing of the Marshall plan, the acknowledgement of Israel as a new state, the careful attention to the origins of the Cold War, and the first desegregation of the military.  Not only did Truman win the election, he succeeded in guiding his country forward at a critical time with high stakes and haunting parallels to the modern day.
Image:  Joseph Campbell and Jean Erdman (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Erdman) c. 1939 The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern, by Tod Lindberg      What does it mean to be a hero? In The Heroic Heart, Tod Lindberg traces the quality of heroic greatness from its most distant origin in human prehistory to the present day. The designation of “hero” once conjured mainly the prowess of conquerors and kings slaying their enemies on the battlefield. Heroes in the modern world come in many varieties, from teachers and mentors making a lasting impression on others by giving of themselves, to firefighters no less willing than their ancient counterparts to risk life and limb. They don’t do so to assert a claim of superiority over others, however. Rather, the modern heroic heart acts to serve others and save others. The spirit of modern heroism is generosity, what Lindberg calls “the caring will,” a primal human trait that has flourished alongside the spread of freedom and equality. Through its intimate portraits of historical and literary figures and its subtle depiction of the most difficult problems of politics, The Heroic Heart offers a startlingly original account of the passage from the ancient to the modern world and the part the heroic type has played in it. Lindberg deftly combines social criticism and moral philosophy in a work that ranks with such classics as Thomas Carlyle’s nineteenth-century On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History and Joseph Campbell’s twentieth-century The Hero with a Thousand Faces.
Image:  Japanese print depicting Carlyle's horror at the burning of his manuscript of The French Revolution: A History (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_French_Revolution:_A_History) The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern, by Tod Lindberg      What does it mean to be a hero? In The Heroic Heart, Tod Lindberg traces the quality of heroic greatness from its most distant origin in human prehistory to the present day. The designation of “hero” once conjured mainly the prowess of conquerors and kings slaying their enemies on the battlefield. Heroes in the modern world come in many varieties, from teachers and mentors making a lasting impression on others by giving of themselves, to firefighters no less willing than their ancient counterparts to risk life and limb. They don’t do so to assert a claim of superiority over others, however. Rather, the modern heroic heart acts to serve others and save others. The spirit of modern heroism is generosity, what Lindberg calls “the caring will,” a primal human trait that has flourished alongside the spread of freedom and equality. Through its intimate portraits of historical and literary figures and its subtle depiction of the most difficult problems of politics, The Heroic Heart offers a startlingly original account of the passage from the ancient to the modern world and the part the heroic type has played in it. Lindberg deftly combines social criticism and moral philosophy in a work that ranks with such classics as Thomas Carlyle’s nineteenth-century On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History and Joseph Campbell’s twentieth-century The Hero with a Thousand Faces.
Image:  The Yarnell Fire began on Jun. 28, 2013, from a lightning strike and is approximately 1.5 miles from Yarnell, AZ.  On June 30, it overran and killed 19 members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granite_Mountain_Hotshots) . Just one of the hotshots on the crew survived—he was posted as a lookout on the fire and was not with the others when the fire overtook them.  U.S. Forest Service photo. The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern, by Tod Lindberg      What does it mean to be a hero? In The Heroic Heart, Tod Lindberg traces the quality of heroic greatness from its most distant origin in human prehistory to the present day. The designation of “hero” once conjured mainly the prowess of conquerors and kings slaying their enemies on the battlefield. Heroes in the modern world come in many varieties, from teachers and mentors making a lasting impression on others by giving of themselves, to firefighters no less willing than their ancient counterparts to risk life and limb. They don’t do so to assert a claim of superiority over others, however. Rather, the modern heroic heart acts to serve others and save others. The spirit of modern heroism is generosity, what Lindberg calls “the caring will,” a primal human trait that has flourished alongside the spread of freedom and equality. Through its intimate portraits of historical and literary figures and its subtle depiction of the most difficult problems of politics, The Heroic Heart offers a startlingly original account of the passage from the ancient to the modern world and the part the heroic type has played in it. Lindberg deftly combines social criticism and moral philosophy in a work that ranks with such classics as Thomas Carlyle’s nineteenth-century On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History and Joseph Campbell’s twentieth-century The Hero with a Thousand Faces.
Image:  Odysseus and the Sirens (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siren_(mythology)) , Ulixes mosaic (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosaic) at the Bardo National Museum (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bardo_National_Museum_(Tunis)) in Tunis (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunis) , Tunisia, 2nd century AD The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern, by Tod Lindberg      What does it mean to be a hero? In The Heroic Heart, Tod Lindberg traces the quality of heroic greatness from its most distant origin in human prehistory to the present day. The designation of “hero” once conjured mainly the prowess of conquerors and kings slaying their enemies on the battlefield. Heroes in the modern world come in many varieties, from teachers and mentors making a lasting impression on others by giving of themselves, to firefighters no less willing than their ancient counterparts to risk life and limb. They don’t do so to assert a claim of superiority over others, however. Rather, the modern heroic heart acts to serve others and save others. The spirit of modern heroism is generosity, what Lindberg calls “the caring will,” a primal human trait that has flourished alongside the spread of freedom and equality. Through its intimate portraits of historical and literary figures and its subtle depiction of the most difficult problems of politics, The Heroic Heart offers a startlingly original account of the passage from the ancient to the modern world and the part the heroic type has played in it. Lindberg deftly combines social criticism and moral philosophy in a work that ranks with such classics as Thomas Carlyle’s nineteenth-century On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History and Joseph Campbell’s twentieth-century The Hero with a Thousand Faces.
Photo:1903 This illustration entitled, "Presidential Callers", by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, which appeared in the Washington Post on October 18, 1903, shows squabbling Republican Party leaders of Maryland coming to the White House, where they have been invited by President Roosevelt to find a way to iron out their differences. Berryman Political Cartoon Collection   http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Parler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow What can go wrong and why with a virus vaccine by November: 2of2:   @HehryIMiller @PacificResearch http://www.henrymillermd.org/24564/why-a-coronavirus-vaccine-october-surprise-could
Photo:his illustration entitled, The Democratic "Elaine", by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, which appeared in the Washington Post on July 3, 1904, shows Judge Alton B. Parker, as the Democratic nominee for President, steering the Democratic Party toward heartbreak in the 1904 Presidential Election. This is a direct comparison to Elaine of Astolat of Arthurian legend. Berryman Political Cartoon Collection   http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Parler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow What can go wrong and why with a virus vaccine by November: 1of2:   @HehryIMiller @PacificResearch http://www.henrymillermd.org/24564/why-a-coronavirus-vaccine-october-surprise-could
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Comments (31)

Joe Raia

love the show, only wish when the ads at the end come on they didnt blow out my speakers. nothing inspires a listener to make sure they dont listen to the ads like making the volume of them louder

Sep 12th
Reply

Dean Edwards

Tiptoe around the tulips with JB ....

Jun 3rd
Reply

David West

The United States has been duped by China. China power is the sheer volume of people they produce.

Apr 28th
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dchamberss dchamberss

Great reporting - find current deaths/(deaths+recovered) and you will find the actual mortality rate is much higher than is being reported. Exclude numbers from China and it is even higher.

Mar 6th
Reply (2)

David West

A very necessary clarification. Even though the status of the Democratic party is obvious. This airing and publication of the difference between Socialism and redistribution in a Capatalist country was very necessary.

Mar 5th
Reply

Ryan Kirschner

The existence of God is not a scientific issue, it is a philosophical one. It is part of the study of metaphysics. You don't "calculate" or "run an experiment" to determine if God exists. You apply the art of logic to the question. The fact is that existence exists, and only existence exists. All of existence can be tied back to sensory perception. Fabricating another realm that is outside the realm of existence and cannot be gleaned from sensory perception is a contradiction, and contradictions can't exist.

Aug 21st
Reply (1)

sixfeetfree

Wrong title. This podcast is John Gordon's book, Fighting for MacArthur.

May 12th
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Scott Ehrman

Don't forget operation Preying Mantiss

Mar 21st
Reply

Juan Restrepo

yes, folks love to move from NY and California to places like North Carolina, Virginia and Texas... but then they screw it up and vote Democrat. then those states turn into the garbage they left initially.

Jan 5th
Reply (3)

Juan Restrepo

Richard Epstein is brilliant.

Nov 5th
Reply

Tom Shea

it is interesting that so close to the midterms, you hear no thing about this connection

Oct 18th
Reply (1)

Tom Shea

john.. I am a new convert to your excellent podcast. thank you.

Oct 18th
Reply

Jim Abbett

This guest was way off base about automation creating higher wages. You automate tasks so you don't need skilled workers. Lower skilled workers = lower wages.

Oct 16th
Reply

Sean

I enjoy The John Batchelor Show but I hate the bombarded of so many individual short segmented pieces.

Sep 9th
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Juan Restrepo

I really enjoy Bob Zimmerman on the John Batchelor show.

Sep 2nd
Reply

Ami Gewolb

John batchelor

Jul 20th
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Juan Restrepo

excellent explanation of this issue

Mar 31st
Reply

Juan Restrepo

Eerily true...great show.

Mar 31st
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George Mednick

m

Mar 31st
Reply

Ron Lewenberg

Thank you for these two segments. They really spoke to me.All of my grandparents and father are survivors of the Shoah, and my father's family were from Galicia.

Feb 3rd
Reply
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