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The Journal.

Author: The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet

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The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

386 Episodes
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The oil industry's top lobbying group is poised to embrace a climate policy it had fought for years. WSJ's Timothy Puko explains what's behind that reversal, and what it says about the new political reality facing fossil fuels.
Where Jobs Are Booming

Where Jobs Are Booming

2021-03-0417:241

Even with high unemployment, certain industries are having a hard time finding enough workers. WSJ's Sarah Chaney Cambon explains why some companies are increasing wages and benefits as a result. We also talk to Aaron Jagdfeld, the CEO of a generator company, about the lengths he's taken to recruit workers.
WeWork's biggest shareholder, Softbank, has been dogged by its obligations to the coworking company's co-founder, Adam Neumann. WSJ's Maureen Farrell tells the story of how, after a year, the company severed ties with Neumann and why going public may now be on the horizon.
AMC, the world's largest movie theater chain, was facing possible bankruptcy after the pandemic dried up moviegoing. But early this year, retail investors rallied to #SaveAMC. WSJ's Alexander Gladstone spoke with AMC CEO Adam Aron about how he set the company up to benefit from an unexpected stroke of luck.
Novavax is a vaccine company that for decades never brought a vaccine to market. Before the pandemic, they were on the verge of bankruptcy. WSJ's Gregory Zuckerman and Novavax's Dr. Gregory Glenn explain how the company's fortunes are now changing thanks to its Covid-19 vaccine, which is delivering promising results.
Major film studios are starting to embrace a strategy never before seen in Hollywood: releasing films directly to streaming. Director Lee Daniels joins us to discuss what that change has meant for his new film, "The United States vs. Billie Holiday," and what it could mean for the future of filmmaking.
Facebook's new oversight board is preparing to rule on whether Donald Trump should be banned from Facebook permanently. We talk with one of the board's co-chairs, former Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, about how the board is weighing the decision and what it means for free speech on the platform.
Billy Markus created the cryptocurrency Dogecoin on a lark, based on a viral dog meme. Eight years later, his creation is worth billions of dollars. Markus and WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff explain how crypto's jokiest coin went to the moon.
Dominion Voting Systems, the voting-machine maker, was swept up in a storm of allegations about its role in the 2020 election. We speak with Dominion's CEO, and WSJ's Alexa Corse describes how the company is fighting back.
Texas's deregulated power sector was considered a model for delivering cheap electricity, but the power outages last week revealed shortcomings. WSJ's Russell Gold unpacks what went wrong.
Last year, President Trump banned most new visas for foreign workers, arguing unemployed Americans would take those jobs instead. But as WSJ's Alicia Caldwell explains, even with high unemployment, many of those positions were left unfilled.
Robinhood is able to offer free trading on its app thanks to a practice known as payment for order flow. WSJ's Alexander Osipovich explains how it works and why Congress has questions about it.
As a federal judge, John Gleeson would have to impose decadeslong sentences for certain crimes. Now, he's on a mission to undo some of those same sentences. We talk to the WSJ's Corinne Ramey, Gleeson and one man who's been freed by Gleeson's strategy.
Australia is poised to pass a law that would compel tech companies like Google and Facebook to pay news organizations for links. In response, Google threatened to turn off search, and Facebook said it wouldn't let users share articles. WSJ's Mike Cherney explains what's at stake.
Apple is launching a new privacy feature that Facebook says could severely hurt its business by making it harder to target consumers with ads. WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman explains why the dispute has been years in the making.
Five WallStreetBets members tell the story of how they ended up on the Reddit forum and how they felt when it upended the stock market.
Companies with no business plan, no profit, and no revenue are flooding Wall Street. They're called SPACs, and investors are pouring money into them. WSJ's Maureen Farrell explains the forces behind the market's SPAC boom and what it could mean for investors.
GM's All-Electric Bet

GM's All-Electric Bet

2021-02-0915:472

General Motors has committed to making all its vehicles electric by 2035. WSJ's Mike Colias explains GM's history making electric vehicles and why it's now going all-in.
Donald Trump is the first president to be impeached twice. Now, the Senate will vote on whether or not to convict him. WSJ's Siobhan Hughes outlines what's different about this impeachment and what problems it could raise on both sides of the aisle.
When Vincent Orr decided to buy a house, he didn't get a mortgage. He paid cash, and he's not alone. WSJ's Ben Eisen explains why Black Detroiters still have a tough time getting mortgages decades after racist redlining policies officially ended.
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Comments (33)

Charlie Spierto

Elon Musk is not the founder of Tesla, incorrectly noted in this episode.

Feb 25th
Reply

J.

because he is hypocritical politician who cares more about keeping his job than actually caring about the people. bidens for prison.

Jan 30th
Reply

J.

fauci is not a real doctor. He is a medical politician. He has literally reversed and then reversed again on mask policies, school opening, mass gathering/looting, ICUs, ventilators, HCQ, vaccine development timeline. He's a man without moral or even medical principles.

Dec 27th
Reply

J.

if you respect your fellow countrymen as rational adults, they will behave as such.

Dec 18th
Reply

Tony

Projected to win* Throwing ongoing litigations out the window is not prudent.

Nov 7th
Reply

William Beshlian

This will end the gig economy

Nov 2nd
Reply

William Beshlian

Good idea. Finding the "Typhoid Mary's" of the 21st century.

Oct 23rd
Reply

Claudio Rodriguez Valdes

this kid is the least relatable hero you could have picked for this story

Oct 6th
Reply

Walter

New member. You must have a goal and stay within your means!

Sep 10th
Reply

Chris Considine

haha Trump staying on message? this aged like milk

Sep 9th
Reply

Curt Coleman

since they have such strong opinions... I wonder how they feel about the people being oppressed and murdered in China?

Sep 2nd
Reply

Charlie Spierto

why not discuss the elephant in the room? Cut public pensions like the private sector has done?

Jul 21st
Reply

J.

It's a European company, you stupid jackass. Are you going to tell Li Ning that their sports brand lacks diversity because it features mostly chinese people?!

Jul 1st
Reply

Somnambulist_23

'trump came in and lied about his polling, then lied about the virus, and continued to lie for the entire interview' WSJ why give the lying criminal any platform?

Jun 24th
Reply

J.

What did you think was gonna happen when you invested in a commie company, dumbass!

Jun 13th
Reply

J.

His business got looted, he's still protesting. Anti-riot protesting?

Jun 6th
Reply

Lisa D

Excellent program. Solid questions that I wanted to ask Dr. Fauci. Thank you for this.

Apr 8th
Reply (1)

J.

It's a pissing contest. The saudis are rich, they will last. The russians are taking money from the chinese, they will also last.

Mar 14th
Reply

J.

If a Republican declares he's running on a "democratic nazism" and those millions of deaths in the 20th century were not the result of "real nazism." I think that guy would have been burned on a stake.

Feb 29th
Reply (1)

wendy awiti

Very insightful episode.

Feb 1st
Reply
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