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The Journal.

Author: The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet

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The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

119 Episodes
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The Last Train Out of Wuhan

The Last Train Out of Wuhan

2020-01-2800:19:131

China has responded to the spread of a deadly new virus by locking down cities and quarantining tens of millions of people. WSJ's Shan Li reports from the epicenter, and science editor Stefanie Ilgenfritz analyzes China's response to the new coronavirus.
Who Hacked Jeff Bezos?

Who Hacked Jeff Bezos?

2020-01-2700:22:53

Investigators hired by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos claimed last week that his phone was hacked by Saudi Arabia. WSJ's Justin Scheck and Michael Siconolfi explain the history of leaks of Bezos's texts, and how Bezos and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman became archenemies.
270 people were killed when a dam owned by the mining giant Vale collapsed. After a year-long investigation, WSJ's Samantha Pearson and Luciana Magalhaes explain the negligence and coverup inside one of Brazil's biggest companies.
The Tug of War Over Tesla

The Tug of War Over Tesla

2020-01-2300:19:201

Tesla's stock has been on a tear since late last year, and this week the company's valuation reached $100 billion. Investors who believe in the stock couldn't be happier. But others think the company is overvalued. WSJ's Gunjan Banerji explains the divide.
Wall Street's Climate Gambit

Wall Street's Climate Gambit

2020-01-2200:16:032

BlackRock, the biggest money manager in the world, announced that it plans to make sustainability a focus of its investment strategy. WSJ's Geoffrey Rogow explains what the change means.
The President's Defense

The President's Defense

2020-01-2100:19:562

Opening arguments kick off this week in the Senate's impeachment trial. President Trump has assembled a legal team with a lot of star power to defend him. WSJ's Michael Bender introduces us to the team and explains their case.
The Boeing 737 MAX has been grounded for nearly a year after two deadly crashes. WSJ's Alison Sider explains how the plane's grounding has upended carriers like American Airlines and rippled through the aviation industry.
Attorney General William Barr criticized Apple on Monday for not helping the Department of Justice get into the iPhones of the Florida naval base shooter. WSJ's Robert McMillan explains Apple's philosophy on letting the government in.
How Airbnb Deals With Crime

How Airbnb Deals With Crime

2020-01-1500:19:07

After a deadly mass shooting, Airbnb faced questions about how much responsibility it has for safety at the properties listed on its site. WSJ's Kirsten Grind investigates Airbnb's efforts to fight crime on its platform.
The Democrats running for president this year have employed three different fundraising strategies to fuel their campaigns. WSJ's Julie Bykowicz breaks down the different tactics and explains how those strategies could shape the race.
The world desperately needs new antibiotics to tackle the rising threat of drug-resistant superbugs, but there is little reward for doing so. WSJ's Denise Roland explains problems facing antibiotics companies.
Google has struck deals with health providers that give the company access to millions of personal medical records without notifying patients. WSJ's Rob Copeland explains Google's plans for the data.
Facing questions about his escape from Japan, former auto executive Carlos Ghosn defended himself against charges of financial crimes in a blistering and emotional press conference. WSJ's Nick Kostov explains Ghosn's defense.
Iranian missiles struck two Iraqi bases housing U.S. troops last night, a response to the United States' killing of an Iranian general. WSJ's Sune Engel Rasmussen explains what went into Iran's decision.
Carlos Ghosn went from a globe-trotting top executive to international fugitive in a year. WSJ's Nick Kostov explains what led Ghosn to flee Japan in a box made for audio gear and how he pulled off his escape.
Goldman Sachs helped Malaysia raise over $6 billion for its economic development fund, 1MDB. Prosecutors say much of the fund's money was then stolen. WSJ's Liz Hoffman explains the scandal and why the bank may soon face punishment for its alleged role.
A U.S. strike in Baghdad killed Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani yesterday. WSJ's Michael Gordon explains Soleimani's significance, what's known about the killing and what it means for the region and the U.S.
Google has long held up its search results as objective and essentially autonomous, the product of computer algorithms. But WSJ's Kirsten Grind explains how Google has interfered with search more than the company has acknowledged.
WeWork: The Enablers

WeWork: The Enablers

2019-12-2300:21:395

Adam Neumann, WeWork's former CEO, has been under intense scrutiny since the company's fall from grace. But there's also another group of people behind the dramatic unraveling: WeWork's investors. WSJ's Maureen Farrell and Eliot Brown take us into the thinking of WeWork's biggest backers.
The U.S. announced a "phase one" trade deal with China last week, halting the trade war between the countries. WSJ's Jacob Schlesinger looks back on a year of escalating tariffs and explains what it was like for businesses caught in the middle.
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Comments (10)

Amy Byrket

This should have had a warning for content inappropriate for kids. Listeners often have kids in the car. This isn’t a podcast that would contain sensitive content

Jan 16th
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Pratap Nair

Y is this podcast not working. Unable to hear any of the episodes

Dec 13th
Reply

J.

taylor is just being taylor -- an immature little girl. no matter how much she has. nothing to see here.

Nov 20th
Reply (1)

J.

This also shows you these so-called socially conscious organizations like Hollywood and the NBA, doesn't give a damn about your social justice. it's what sells. when things really matter and they have to make a true stance between right and wrong, they pick money even if it goes against everything they allegedly believe in. left learning liberal groups are not more than hypocrites.

Oct 12th
Reply

J.

What's the solution? Bring the whole crumbling to the ground that's called the chinese communist government. That God-damnn government is brainwashing china into a loser country. Take it down. Take it all down!

Oct 12th
Reply

Elijah Claude

Not one mention of Andrew Yang's Freedom Dividend.... Which is one of the only programs where both the left and the right can agree on in some way. The only plan that holds corporations accountable... 🙄

Sep 14th
Reply (1)

Xiaotao Wang

is there text of this recording, would be better!

Aug 30th
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Bookshopedreams

great podcast!

Aug 13th
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