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In North Carolina, Rep. Ted Budd — boosted by Donald Trump's endorsement — secured a decisive win over the state's former two-term governor.And in Pennsylvania, Trump's pick for governor won the primary contest despite spreading false claims about the presidential election results. The state's GOP Senate primary remains too close to call.As expected, North Carolina's Cheri Beasley and Pennsylvania's John Fetterman comfortably won their states' Democratic primaries.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A prominent conference of American conservatives — the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) — will take place in Hungary this week. Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has curtailed institutional checks on his power and railed against immigration and LGBTQ rights, will be the keynote speaker.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The suspected gunman in Saturday's shooting in Buffalo, N.Y. is alleged to have written a racist screed explaining his motivations. One of the topics discussed is "replacement theory," a talking point that has made its way to statements made by Republican lawmakers and Fox News hosts despite its past as a fringe idea in racist forums. Today, a look at what replacement theory is, how it became amplified & what implications that has on the political process.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson and national security correspondent Odette Yousef.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: May 13th

Weekly Roundup: May 13th

2022-05-1327:171

Senator Minority Leader Mitch McConnell sat down with NPR's Deirdre Walsh for a conversation about the leaked Supreme Court draft that would spell the end of Roe v. Wade, his success at reshaping the federal judiciary, and what his relationship with the Biden White House will be if Republicans gain control of the Senate in November.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, acting congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, national political correspondent, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Senate Democrats failed to pass a bill that would have codified the right to an abortion Wednesday, with West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin voting with all Republicans in opposition. Polls show a majority of Americans support Roe V. Wade, but opinions vary widely when it comes to restrictions like waiting periods, required ultrasounds, and gestational cutoffs. Also, we look at how different religions define the beginning of life, and what that means for the thorny political debate on abortion. This episode: White House Correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national correspondent Susan Davis. Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Rep. Henry Cuellar is a conservative Democrat who has represented the 28th Congressional District in south Texas since 2005. Backed by Democratic congressional leaders, he's fighting to keep his seat against a primary challenge from progressive Jessica Cisneros who says the congressman's immigration and social policies are out of step with what Democratic voters believe. This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and voting reporter Ashley Lopez.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In an economic speech that felt like a campaign stump, Biden touted his administration's efforts to bolster the American economy. He said that inflation is his top domestic priority and suggested that though costs may be up, voters are still better off with Democrats in charge.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
After initially being reluctant to talk about the substance of the leaked Supreme Court opinion, GOP lawmakers have begun to campaign on the exaggerated notion that Democratic lawmakers support abortion until the moment of birth. And Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell raised the possibility of bringing a national abortion ban to a vote if Republicans take power in the midterms, though the Biden White House would almost certainly veto such a bill.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, acting congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Supreme Court may be on the cusp of overturning Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling which established abortion access as a constitutional right. In this edited conversation from September, Nina Totenberg and Tamara Keith discuss what the U.S. looked like before the Roe decision — and what it could look like if the high court strikes it down.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Lots of people have gotten jobs recently and paychecks are, on average, getting bigger. But what those paychecks can buy is shrinking because costs are going up. So, the Federal Reserve is taking steps to limit the amount of money bouncing around in the economy. That should help slow price increases — but risks a recession.And far-right group leaders are pleading guilty to serious charges tied to their involvement in the January 6th riot. And the congressional investigation has interviewed nearly 1000 people ahead of "primetime" hearings in June.Also: Keanu Reeves reports for the CBC, Blake Lively wears a dress, and Judge Judy makes money.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
It depends how the final opinion is written. And, President Biden said that voters need to elect more Democrats in order to ensure their rights are protected. The remark frustrated some young activists. Young voters turned out at near-record levels in 2020, but many have softened in their support of President Biden because they feel he has not delivered on the policy promises that are most important to them.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and politics and racial justice correspondent Juana Summers.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The primary race illustrated the state's dramatic conservative turn in recent years. If Vance bests Democrat Tim Ryan in November, the 37 year-old would join a wave of young conservative lawmakers inspired by Trump who will help to cement the former president's political legacy in the decades to come.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
According to a draft opinion obtained by POLITICO, there is a five-justice conservative majority ready to strike down Roe v. Wade, the case which established a constitutionally-protected right to an abortion. While, in theory, some justices could change their views before the ruling is formally issued, the leak signals a major shift in women's rights in the United States — and in the norms and reputation of the Supreme Court.Read more of our coverage at NPR.orgThis episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The White House pitch to provide consistent support for Ukraine through the end of September at a cost of $33 billion has broad support in Congress. Meanwhile, the administration's ask for additional COVID funds remains tied up in disagreements over where the money will come from. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, 47% of registered voters surveyed said they are more likely to vote for the Republican in their district, as opposed to 44% who said they preferred a Democrat. Because congressional districts across the U.S. are drawn in a way that broadly favors Republicans, Democrats need a national lead of at least a few points to break even. The last time Republicans were up in our poll, in 2014, the party won control of both the House and the Senate.Despite Democrats' projected losses, though, it could still be a good year for progressives — who have the upper hand in a number of party primary races.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political correspondent Juana Summers, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Supreme Court is considering a case that could significantly weaken the right to abortion — or even scrap it entirely. With Roe V. Wade on shaky ground, Republican-led states are already passing laws to ban or heavily restrict abortion, while Democratic state legislatures are taking steps to guarantee the right to end a pregnancy This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national correspondent Sarah McCammon, Catherine Sweeney of State Impact Oklahoma, and Bente Birkeland of Colorado Public Radio. Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A flurry of headlines out of the Sunshine State: Gov. Ron DeSantis — a rising star in the Republican party and apparent presidential hopeful — is feuding with Disney after it criticized a new law limiting dicussion of gender and sexual identity in schools, a severe GOP gerrymander that will limit Black political power in the state, and new voting restrictions.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, national correspondent Greg Allen, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a conversation with NPR, Reps. Ro Khanna of California and Jamie Raskin of Maryland said that while thin margins have limited Democrats' legislative agenda, the American Rescue Plan and infrastructure package have made a considerable difference in the lives of Americans — and that touting those wins to voters should buoy the party's chances in the midterms. In Arizona, Rep. Greg Stanton, a former Democratic mayor of Phoenix, won his district handily in 2020 but a redrawn map has put him in a tough fight to keep his seat against a crowded Republican field. The economy and immigration are central issues in the campaign and progressive politics are far from top of mind.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and acting congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Thirty-eight percent of Americans under 30 want to see student debt cancelled entirely. Despite a campaign trail promise to eliminate some debt, President Biden has yet to take any action beyond continuing Trump's pause on loan repayments. For years, an Education Department loan program has failed to live up to the promises it made to students — the department is now promising to make amends.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and education correspondent Cory Turner.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: April 22

Weekly Roundup: April 22

2022-04-2228:584

The United States will welcome up to 100,000 Ukrainians and will streamline their immigration and vetting process, the White House told reporters this week. The news comes as Russian violence continues to roil the country's east. Another possible mass grave with as many as 9,000 bodies has been found near the besieged city of Mariupol. And in both France and the United States, inflation is making paychecks feel smaller—and it has become an animating issue for conservative voters. French President Emmanuel Macron faces populist Marine Le Pen in a runoff election this weekend.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, white House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and France correspondent Eleanor Beardsley.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Comments (606)

D Fiala

Such rank, disingenuous nonsense. None of this is a fucking mystery if you aren't an idiot or a liar

May 6th
Reply

Tom Rooney

Which part of ''the federal government has no constitutional power to tell states that they must allow abortion'' does the malthusian Left not understand?

May 4th
Reply

Elliot Daly

"a lot to unpack here" doesnt even begin to describe the contents of this episode lol

Apr 22nd
Reply

Cody Buttron

Would also allow all religions to do this, or just Christians? I sure the church of Satan will have fun with this.

Apr 21st
Reply

Maureen Manning

I love SEX and I love to SUCK my photos 🔞 bio http://top.porked.me/MaureenManning

Apr 8th
Reply

an interested party

WHATT!!!! commercials selling products can't tell a lie about their products but politicians selling themselves can lie out there @#$! who makes these rules? And how do we stop them?

Apr 3rd
Reply

Cody Buttron

As long a the curriculum is approved by the department of vice and virtue you will be allowed to learn it... wait we're talking about the Taliban right?

Mar 30th
Reply

Alvin Burstein

business t

Mar 21st
Reply

Pætrïck Lėő Dåvīd

what about when Poland goes?

Mar 17th
Reply

rshackleford53

These people are disgusting propagandists.

Mar 8th
Reply (16)

kade estill

You just lost a listener, and you're as corrupt as the left NPR. So much shit going on in the world and you post this garbage and you have nothing to support it. FUCK THE ELITE. Fuck the deep state

Mar 5th
Reply (2)

Cody Buttron

I had an idea about this the other day. I wonder if if it would be possible to create a pandemic mobile emergency quatine mask. This would look like a open glass diving mask connected to an airfilter and purification device that can also capture samples of breath to test for infections, if detected alerting the user to seek medical help. Now place these at border crossings, airports and other terminals of migration just hang on wall chagers like a life vest on a boat. If the WHO issues a high threat of a new outbreak people could voluntarily dawn the masks as they continue to move around the world without fear of spreading it unknowingly, slowing it down enough to possibly isolate and eliminate.

Mar 3rd
Reply

squogg

"I know some demonic stuff when I see it." - Ayesha Rascoe on birds falling from the sky 🤣🤣

Feb 19th
Reply

rshackleford53

"How did we get here?" NPR: "It's all about race" typical. Read Revolt of the Elites by Lasch, at least.

Jan 14th
Reply (3)

rshackleford53

is Covid the same as polio?

Jan 14th
Reply

squogg

Thank you for taking a moment to be real at the end.

Jan 6th
Reply

an interested party

Manchin sucks!

Dec 20th
Reply (5)

an interested party

inflation if because we were going last year & not were out & about & the goods are stuck at ports of entry. supply & demand

Dec 19th
Reply

rshackleford53

Lol. This fucking cope.

Dec 15th
Reply

an interested party

hey how about a law that lets regular citizens sue those political people or anyone who gives out disinformation on vaccines that leads to the death of someone, let them be sued for wrongful death! how about that!

Dec 11th
Reply
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