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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
1026 Episodes
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The president's Civilian Climate Corps proposal is a reboot of a New Deal era program that employed young men to build trails, parks, and other nature projects. While it is hard to say what will get through Congress, the initiative appears popular with a diverse set of voters.SEE PHOTOS OF NATE'S TRIPThis episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and national correspondent Nate Rott.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
House Republican bomb throwers Marjorie Taylor Greene and Matt Gaetz threw a rally at The Villages retirement community in Florida this weekend. It showcased how the Republican Party's base has dropped its ideological core to define itself by loyalty to Trump, even after his defeat.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, demographics and culture reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: May 7th

Weekly Roundup: May 7th

2021-05-0726:444

Wyoming Representative Liz Cheney currently sits as the third highest ranking Republican in the House, but that may not last long. She's at odds with her party over one thing: that former President did in fact lose the election. A rising star and Trump loyalist is now poised to take her position. Plus, as Biden punts on immigration reform, activists worry that no substantial change will come during his term.This episode: political reporter Juana Summers, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Technical expertise and supply chains shortages will pose huge challenges for global manufactures hoping to manufacture coronavirus vaccines, despite President Biden's support in waiving patents. Plus, how to convince more Americans to get vaccinated.This episode: political correspondent Juana Summers, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and pharmaceutical correspondent Sydney Lupkin.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Facebook's moderation board has upheld the company's decision to suspend Donald Trump's account because of posts expressing support for rioters, though the board says Facebook should determine whether or not the ban is permanent within six months.This episode: political correspondent Juana Summers, tech correspondent Shannon Bond, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Reeling from the political fallout after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, some liberal groups are pushing for Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer to retire from the high court while Democrats control the nomination and confirmation process.This episode: political correspondent Juana Summers, demographics and culture reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Biden has touted his desire to bring transformational change to American society, but his pursuit of compromise might curb what's possible on infrastructure.This episode: political correspondent Juana Summers, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This week, California's secretary of state confirmed that there are enough valid signatures to trigger a recall election of Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat. Newsom was praised last spring for his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in the state, so how did the tides turn against him? Also, federal investigators raided Rudy Giuliani's apartment this week as part of a probe into the former New York city mayor's activities involving Ukraine.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales and CapRadio's Nicole Nixon.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.Watch our 4/27 NPR Politics After Dark live show
The first round of Census numbers out this week will help to determine each community's electoral clout and share of federal resources. An ongoing audit will help to determine if groups were correctly counted and the margin of error.This episode: demographics and culture reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and Census correspondent Hansi Lo Wang.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In his first address to a joint session of Congress, President Biden detailed how he says his two multi-trillion dollar legislative proposals will reshape American society.READ OUR COVERAGEThis episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and political correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Docket is a new ongoing series from The NPR Politics Podcast where we examine the major legal questions of our time. Where does a law come from, and how does it impact daily life?This year the Supreme Court will decide whether or not a student cussing out her school on Snapchat is free speech. The decision could have wide-reaching implications for students across the country.This episode: legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
As President Biden nears his 100th day in office, how much credit is he due for curbing the pandemic and what challenges remain?This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and health correspondent Allison Aubrey.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a 94-to-1 vote, the Senate passed a bill aimed at reducing hate crimes directed at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. And more than half of American adults have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine; reaching the rest will be harder.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional reporter Claudia Grisales.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Ahead of the meeting, the US announced its goal to halve emissions from 2005 levels by the end of this decade. It was one of a number of pledges announced by world leaders at Thursday's Earth Day summit.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and science correspondent Lauren Sommer.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
One day after a jury convicted former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on murder charges, the U.S. Justice Department launched an investigation into possible patterns of discrimination and excessive force among the police department there. President Biden, the oldest man to occupy the nation's highest office, is conspicuously concerned with how history will remember him.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, national correspondent Cheryl Corley, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The jury has found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all the counts he faced over the death of George Floyd. After the verdict, President Biden and Vice President Harris joined Floyd's family in calling on the Senate to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, political correspondent Juana Summers, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
How will the US slash emissions by 2030? White House climate adviser Gina McCarthy talks to NPR's Scott Detrow ahead of this week's climate summit with world leaders.This episode: White House correspondents Ayesha Rascoe and Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Members of the House and Senate, all former governors and mayors, attended a meeting at the White House today to talk infrastructure priorities with the president. A second infrastructure plan, in addition to the current $2 trillion plan under consideration, will focus on paid leave and childcare issues.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Testimony ended Thursday in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, facing charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in George Floyd's death.After the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was halted in the United States, conspiracy theorists leveraged news articles to spread disinformation online.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, national correspondent Adrian Florido, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, political reporter Miles Parks, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found that Americans generally support making things like broadband part of infrastructure, but they don't agree on how to pay for it. Plus, Republicans shift away from corporations to shore up their support from the white working class.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (524)

alli lent

wasn't there already a company that partnered with one of the approved companies to help make more? why can't they just do those with other countries to skip all this figuring it out stuff? just be actually good people and help countries get vaccines!!

May 6th
Reply

A Turner

(Yes- I delayed my #MaineCoonCat coat stripping b/c of COVID...Mama did it at home-SMH)

May 3rd
Reply

alli lent

but slow population growth is good for the planet.......

Apr 30th
Reply

alli lent

senator Tim Scott was frustrating to listen to. I didn't make it very far. gave up once he said getting rid of the tax cuts (that did *not* lead to higher wages) would cause wages to drop. no logic anywhere.

Apr 29th
Reply

Caleb Shuler Sr

good

Mar 25th
Reply

Caleb Shuler Sr

you mean, historic inaccurate vote count election

Mar 17th
Reply

Carlene dean

Also, My heart goes out to those people suffering in Texas. One hours that their energy companies and people in influential positions will learn from this disaster to help prevent a similar event in the future. Also, I'm sick to death of "cancel culture" and fervently wish that it would get cancelled.

Feb 22nd
Reply

alli lent

I got chills listening to the whispering...... can't even imagine how scary that must have been.... how can almost half the Congress just forget living through that?

Feb 12th
Reply

Jayann Chipman

oh no, they've cut off the end 😢

Feb 6th
Reply

Leslie Nathan

so funny that sen. portman warns of the dangers of the biden administration starting out on a partisan foot, yet it's the only way the repubs operate. the typical repub hypocrisy

Jan 29th
Reply

Kurben Nnm

definitely don't feel like listening to a Trump enabler

Jan 28th
Reply (4)

Ariel Reynante

I totally agree that the poem was the best performance

Jan 22nd
Reply

Alejandro Razcon

too many big words. can't compute

Jan 22nd
Reply

alli lent

do. not. give. in. to. mitch. at. all. he is only one man in the Senate. he is not in charge anymore.

Jan 21st
Reply

Suzanne Hubbard Gerken

A fabulous day! #NPRPolitics

Jan 20th
Reply (1)

lynn

Ahhhhhhh LOVE HER

Jan 15th
Reply

alli lent

would the 25th amendment stop Trump from running again in 2024? 'cause if not, that doesn't seem like enough to me..

Jan 13th
Reply (2)

Noel Gonzalez

Just watch as impeachment becomes routine and uneventful.

Jan 13th
Reply

Andrew Stimpson Gee

I don't know everything but I think this rhetoric is disrespectful to the police officer who died in defending the capital.

Jan 8th
Reply

Vicky Riddle

I don't understand how Trump has power when he's not president anymore. how can he run the Republican party if he's not in the Republican party? call me ignorant but I don't understand why he has such power even when he's out of office.

Jan 5th
Reply (6)
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