Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
This episode is available to everyone, though on some platforms there may be a short delay in availability between the version for subscribers (which is sponsor-free) and non-subscribers (which includes sponsor interruptions). Thank you for your patience! "The public's clear and powerful interest in understanding what occurred under these circumstances weighs heavily in favor of unsealing," said a filing from the Department of Justice related to the search of former president Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago home in Florida. Speaking to reporters Thursday afternoon, Attorney General Merrick Garland said he personally approved the warrant for the search, though it remains unclear when the warrant might be made public. This episode: political correspondent Ashley Lopez, justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Learn more about upcoming live shows of The NPR Politics Podcast at nprpresents.org.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
This episode is available to everyone, though on some platforms there may be a short delay in availability between the version for subscribers (which is sponsor-free) and non-subscribers (which includes sponsor interruptions). Thank you for your patience! Both major parties were surprised, for different reasons, by the results in this month's referendum in Kansas that could have ended the right to an abortion by amending the state constitution. What can Democrats and Republicans take away from the Kansas vote as they craft their messaging strategies for November's midterms? This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, political reporter Barbara Sprunt, and congressional correspondent Kelsey SnellLearn more about upcoming live shows of The NPR Politics Podcast at nprpresents.org.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
This episode is available to everyone, though on some platforms there may be a short delay in availability between the version for subscribers (which is sponsor-free) and non-subscribers (which includes sponsor interruptions). Thank you for your patience! FBI agents executed a search warrant on the Florida home of former president Donald Trump Monday, though it remains unclear what they were looking for. We explore and contextualize the implications of the search, both politically and historically, as Republicans and Democrats alike prepare for the midterm elections this fall. This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor & correspondent Domenico MontanaroLearn more about upcoming live shows of The NPR Politics Podcast at nprpresents.org.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
This episode is available to everyone, though on some platforms there may be a short delay in availability between the version for subscribers (which is sponsor-free) and non-subscribers (which includes sponsor interruptions). Thank you for your patience! The Department of Health and Human Services' declaration Thursday means the federal government can use additional resources in trying to combat the spread of monkeypox, of which there are more than 7,500 cases in the United States. But, what exactly is monkeypox, and who is most at risk of contracting it? And with vaccination rollouts moving slowly, is there a concern the country has not fully learned from mistakes made in the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic? This episode: White House correspondents Asma Khalid and Franco Ordoñez, and science correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff.Learn more about upcoming live shows of The NPR Politics Podcast at nprpresents.org.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
This week, the president all but secured the passage of his major policy priorities, oversaw a strike that took out a top terrorist, and got a strong economic report as gas prices fell. But tensions with China continue to rise after Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan.And Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán headlined a conservative political conference in Dallas. The authoritarian-minded leader has become a darling of the American right, echoing many of the same social priorities — while often veering into outright anti-Semitism and racism.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Deepa Shivaram, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, political correspondent Ashley Lopez, and media correspondent David Folkenflik.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
"We are taking the lessons we learned in 2020, and we are going forward to make sure they never happen again, ever," said Cleta Mitchell, a Republican election lawyer, during a meeting concerning "election integrity" efforts. Groups on the right who buy into the "big lie" concerning the 2020 election are trying to refocus and reform efforts ahead of upcoming elections, according to audio of these meetings obtained by NPR.Guy Reffitt, a person who went to the Capitol on Jan. 6, was sentenced to more than seven years in prison for his actions during the insurrection. How will his trial and sentencing influence further legal action for those charged in relation to the riots? This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and investigative correspondent Tom Dreisbach.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Kansas voters overwhelmingly rejected a measure that would have opened the door to abortion restrictions in the state. Election turnout was incredibly high, signaling the issue may spur increased Democratic turnout in November.And in Arizona, Mark Finchem, a state representative and election conspiracy theorist who was endorsed by former President Donald Trump, has secured the GOP's nomination for Secretary of State, according to the Associated Press. Should Finchem win in the general, he would oversee the state's voting systems.This episode: political reporter Miles Parks, political correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and KJZZ political reporter Ben Giles.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
A key 9/11 plotter, Ayman al-Zawahiri was killed on July 30, according to President Joe Biden. The president said that no one else was hurt in the strike, including al-Zawahiri's family.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi visits Taiwan today, She is the highest-ranking elected American official to visit Taiwan since then-Speaker Newt Gingrich in 1997. The island democracy governs itself, but China claims it as its territory and the speaker's visit has heightened tensions with the Chinese government in Beijing.This episode: politics reporter Miles Parks, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, and China correspondent Emily Feng.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
While voters and pundits alike wait to see which candidates will declare presidential runs, potential candidates on the Republican side are trying to distance themselves from former president Donald Trump. Many Democrats, meanwhile, remain skeptical of President Biden's chances in 2024 & wonder if he should not seek a second term. Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
President Biden scored a major legislative victory this week as West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin agreed to back the administration's Inflation Reduction Act in the Senate. But, what could the bill do if passed, and will it help an economy some argue is either close to — or already in — a recession?This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and business correspondent David Gura.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The Department of Justice's investigation into the events of January 6 has expanded to include testimony from more members of then-President Trump and then-Vice President Pence's inner circles, like former Pence chief of staff Marc Short. But does this investigation have any impact on how Republican voters say they plan to vote in the 2024 presidential primaries?Listen to our special report on the January 6th attacks.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
After Roe v. Wade was overturned in June, the issue of reproductive rights was returned to states to decide. In a special session currently taking place in the Indiana legislature, Republican lawmakers are pushing to ban most abortions in the state, with a few exceptions. But, not all Republicans are on board with the proposal, saying it goes too far, and the White House is also lobbying against the measure. This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and Indiana Public Broadcasting statehouse bureau chief Brandon Davis.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
After June's ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization overturned the constitutional right to an abortion established in Roe v. Wade, Democrats in Congress are trying to enshrine other protections into federal law in case they are subject to similar Supreme Court action. A bill seeking to protect the right to same-sex marriage has passed the House with bipartisan support, but faces a challenge in the evenly divided Senate. This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and political correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The former president and vice president held separate rallies for candidates in Arizona's August Republican gubernatorial primary election, drawing a contrast in how each wants to guide the direction of the party. Mike Pence's preferred candidate, Karrin Taylor Robson, is supported by the state's outgoing governor, Doug Ducey, while Donald Trump's pick, Kari Lake, is running a campaign that mirrors many of his policies and, his falsehoods about the 2020 presidential election. This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and KJZZ report Ben Giles.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
How did the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol come together? Who was involved in planning it? What did President Trump know and why did he take so long to respond? How much danger were lawmakers in? And, finally, who will be held accountable?In this hourlong special, the NPR Politics team breaks down the key insights from the public hearings.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
President Biden has tested positive for the coronavirus and is experiencing mild symptoms. Our coverage: https://n.pr/3zoCtkbIs there such a thing as "the Hispanic vote"? Is Latino a more suitable term? And who is Ben Fernandez, the first person of Hispanic origin to run for president?In our latest installment of the NPR Politics Book Club, Danielle Kurtzleben talks to Geraldo Cadava about his book The Hispanic Republican: The Shaping of an American Political Identity, from Nixon to Trump.Our September book selection is The Family Roe, by Joshua Prager. Join the conversation in our Facebook group, send your questions to @titonka on Twitter or via email to politicsbookclub@npr.org.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The president's support among young voters — who generally trend Democratic — is anemic, with their level of support comparable with his numbers among whites without college degrees and white evangelical Christians. Part of the problem for Biden may be his big promises: then-candidate Biden promised transformational change, but his narrow control of the Senate and intraparty opposition has constrained his progress on key goals like climate. Despite the president's posture as a deal-maker, he has been largely absent from efforts to break the legislative logjam.This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter..
The effort has further taxed local election officials, who have fielded worried calls from voters who believed that the canvassers were affiliated with the government.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, voting reporter Miles Parks, and Colorado Public Radio reporter Bente Birkeland.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter..
Black gun owners told NPR that they largely own guns for protection; many feel the government does not do enough to protect their safety. Unlike most white gun owners, most Black gun owners feel that it is more important to control gun violence than it is to protect gun rights.Read more: https://n.pr/3ze01rWThis episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, race and identity reporter Alana Wise, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The young candidates say they hope to fix broken institutions that they feel have let their generation down. And a quirk in how a half-century old voting rights provision is written means many Americans have trouble getting ballots in languages like Arabic and Haitian Creole.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, political reporter Elena Moore, political correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and voting correspondent Hansi Lo Wang.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Comments (625)

Cody Buttron

Is it possible that Clarence Tomas is doing the just to get out of being married to his crazy wife, if the court rules interracial marriage as a none protected right he can finally be free without having to tell God he got a divorce

Jul 27th
Reply

Brad Prenger

Please cite the (either still active or recently overturned) state or fed policy that intentionally prohibits certain skin colors from owning guns? I'm genuinely interested if I'm misinterpreting your statement or what actual piece of legislation does that?

Jul 21st
Reply (1)

an interested party

If the Democrats want to win the 2024 election they have to have another candidate besides Biden. He's going to be too old.

Jul 21st
Reply (1)

Francis Robert

Why are you trying to divide the 2A community? 2A advocates don't give two shots about the melanin concentration of their comrades, 2A is for everyone.

Jul 19th
Reply

rshackleford53

Inflation was caused by the Federal Reserve holding the interest rates below 2%, buying bonds and assets, and propping up the stock market with cheap credit. That interest used to mean something, but it's pennies. If you're an American, odds are you don't save money. You buy cars, houses, electronics all on credit. Your stocks are doing the same. When the Fed buys bonds created by the Treasury Department that's called debt monetization and it's what banana republics do. Your media doesn't acknowledge that because they are owned by the people that benefit. NPR is right. The president doesn't "control" inflation, but every one of them knows what does and they did nothing about it. In fact, they benefited from it. they like to campaign on a "strong economy" even if it's a bubble and when the market is supposed to crash they kick that can down the road with more spending which is almost guaranteed by the Federal Reserve. supply shortage? Sure, but more like artificially stimulated demand meeting the realities of the world.

Jul 14th
Reply

سعید محمدی

how can i see its transcript??

Jul 4th
Reply

Son of Ghazi (Ben Ghazi)

Libs should join the Libertarian party, it's in the name :)

Jun 23rd
Reply

squogg

This is absolutely fascinating!

Jun 15th
Reply

CPSTest BL

Former Attorney General Bill Barr said he became "demoralized" when discussing allegations of voting fraud tied to Dominion voting machines with former President Donald Trump because Trump had "become detached from reality if he really believes this stuff." click here to find out more https://clickspersecondtest.com/

Jun 14th
Reply

Åbn dine øjne

Trump is still the most powerful man in the solar system, one only has to look at his angelic features to see he is not of this earth. The LEFTISTS want you to believe that he doesn't care about the common man, but that's only because he has difficulty understanding Homo Sapien emotions. Get educated plebs.

Jun 13th
Reply

Åbn dine øjne

It's an undisputed FACT that LIEdon utilized robot humanoids to attack the capital, you can see in the footage some of them break down, some of them perform feats of inhuman strength. Do not use 5G, it has an interface with the Federal supercomputers. Get educated minimum wage trash, get educated.

Jun 13th
Reply

Åbn dine øjne

What Marxist/Antifa/Liedon doesn't want you to know is that all of America's population are being kept in saline solution pods, being kept alive through stem cells. Only Q and Donald Trump can see the granular edges of the simulation. I am not being metaphorical, although mouthbreathing insipid trolls will attempt to cast doubt on this real truth. We are not really doing anything, we are floating in pods in a government warehouse. America's population is only about 300,000 while the rest are staged programs. Awaken children, for this is a dream.t

Jun 6th
Reply

Cody Buttron

Either justice prevails and the system crumbles or justice fails and the system crumbles.

Jun 2nd
Reply

Tom Rooney

Which part of ''the federal government has no constitutional power to tell states that they must allow abortion'' does the malthusian Left not understand?

May 4th
Reply

Elliot Daly

"a lot to unpack here" doesnt even begin to describe the contents of this episode lol

Apr 22nd
Reply

Cody Buttron

Would also allow all religions to do this, or just Christians? I sure the church of Satan will have fun with this.

Apr 21st
Reply

Maureen Manning

I love SEX and I love to SUCK my photos 🔞 bio http://top.porked.me/MaureenManning

Apr 8th
Reply

an interested party

WHATT!!!! commercials selling products can't tell a lie about their products but politicians selling themselves can lie out there @#$! who makes these rules? And how do we stop them?

Apr 3rd
Reply

Cody Buttron

As long a the curriculum is approved by the department of vice and virtue you will be allowed to learn it... wait we're talking about the Taliban right?

Mar 30th
Reply

Alvin Burstein

business t

Mar 21st
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store