DiscoverThe New Yorker Radio Hour
The New Yorker Radio Hour
Claim Ownership

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Author: WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

Subscribed: 17,609Played: 128,062
Share

Description

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios
262 Episodes
Reverse
Emilia Clarke on a Near-Death Experience Scarier than “Game of Thrones”
Emilia Clarke was an unknown young actor when she landed the part of Daenerys, of the House of Targaryen, on a show called “Game of Thrones.” After an eventful first season—capped by her walk into a funeral pyre and rebirth as the Mother of Dragons—Clarke’s future looked bright. But after filming wrapped, Clarke faced a crisis more frightening than anything on the show: a life-threatening stroke called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the aftermath of an emergency surgery, she experienced verbal aphasia and was unable to say her name. “It was the scariest thing I’ve ever experienced,” she told David Remnick. “It wasn’t that I didn’t think I was going to make it, it was that I wasn’t prepared to make it.” She feared that the impairment was permanent and would end her life as an actor. “It was in that moment I asked them to just let me die.” Clarke was still recovering from the aftermath of the stroke and the surgery when she began doing a press tour—lying down between appearances and sipping from a morphine bottle, and keeping the crisis a secret. “No one knows who the hell I am,” she recalls thinking. “I was a young girl who was given a huge opportunity. I did not for any reason want to give anyone a reason to think I was anything other than capable of fulfilling the duties they had given me. And I didn’t know what the show was at that moment. All I knew was I had a job.” Emilia Clarke wrote about her experience for the first time in an essay for newyorker.com.
Getting Detained by ICE—on Purpose
In 2012, two young activists from the National Immigrant Youth Alliance went on an undercover mission to infiltrate the Broward Transitional Center, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in Florida. NIYA had been contacted by the son of a man named Claudio Rojas, who was taken from his home by immigration agents and brought to Broward. NIYA has been compared to ACT UP; its members try to force confrontations with authorities over immigration policy. The two activists, who are themselves undocumented, pretended to be newly arrived, confused immigrants who spoke little English. They got themselves arrested by somewhat perplexed Border Patrol agents. The story of those activists is told in a new film called “The Infiltrators,” which recently showed at the Sundance Festival and South by Southwest. It is a kind of quasi-documentary, the directors Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera tell David Remnick; because they were not able to film inside the ICE facility, they staged a reënactment of the events inside a decommissioned mental hospital. Rojas, who had been released from detention after staging a hunger strike, advised the production for verisimilitude. But after the movie’s release, Rojas was suddenly re-detained during a routine check-in with ICE, which he attended with his lawyer. “For eight years I presented myself for supervision visits,” Rojas tells The New Yorker’s Camila Osorio, speaking on the phone from detention. “Why didn’t they detain me before? . . . I am completely sure that this is a reprisal against me, that they want to deport me no matter what.”Note: In regard to Rojas’s suspicion of retaliation on the part of ICE, a spokesman for the agency sent this statement after the story went to air: “ICE detains individuals according to federal law and makes custody decisions based upon the facts of their case. Any accusation that ICE uses retaliatory tactics is patently false.”
loading
Comments (11)

Toby Barraud

Why aren't the prosecutors named in this radio program? I agree with John Thompson : they are guilty of attempted murder. It's an outrage the legal system refuses to hold them accountable. The very least punishment they suffer should be the public recognition of what they did.

Jan 30th
Reply

Rachel McVey

Thanks for having David Bentley Hart on the show to talk about his translation of the New Testament! I was a member of a Bible church until age 24 and was "in the word" every day, instructing others in the scriptures -- while trying my best not to think too much about research on the history of the Bible and its translation that suggested my leather bound NIV might not be precisely God's truth. After listening to this episode, I immediately bought a copy of Hart's translation. It will be the first Bible I'll have opened in more than two years!

Dec 23rd
Reply

Peter Chaloner

Call them Arabs. Call them owners of 22 countries. There are no 'Palestinians.'

Sep 25th
Reply

Modus Pwnens

Peter Chaloner well i guess sort of since theyre being colonized by israel

Nov 30th
Reply

L.S. Mitchell

The ending of this podcast made irony incarnate.

Jul 7th
Reply

Drea Griffin

I think Mark is right. Unless DEMS win being "on my side" serves no purpose

Jun 1st
Reply

Bridget Rathman

it's a little hard to listen to two men talk about women hiding their sexual assault. at one point the interviewer says that one of the women lied to Ronin about her sexual assuault. that's a harsh word choice to apply to a survivor. it's every survivor's choice as to whether or not they want to speak about what happened to them. it's no one's place to judge them for that decision. also the comment Ronin made that it's surprising that pretty, poised women also get sexually harassed is gross on multiple levels. I appreciate what you're doing and am glad this story is out, and am grateful for the part these journalists played. I'm so thankful that you had the woman come on and point out at that it's men listening that had changed. I feel like so much of the focus was on blaming women for not speaking out rather than on men not listening.

May 11th
Reply

David Charbonneau

Schwartz's perspective seems to be that all heterosexual relations are hopelessly f'd up by the bad habits of men. If alien anthropologists picked up this interview on their galactic short wave, they'd have to conclude that the vast majority of men and women are unmarried or desperately sexually unhappy in their relationships because of the bad sexual ideology of men. Please, give me a break. By all means, let's create a culture where abusers and harassers feel ostracized and are so effectively and consistently punished that the deterrents are decisive. But to try and legislate the bedroom is cultural fascism and not only can only lead to pervasive sexual alienation but also completely abdicates the equal responsibility for the state of sexual relations in a non-abusive, consensual relationship, which, by the way, are the vast majority of relationships in this country.

Feb 3rd
Reply

B Knapp

David Charbonneau Cosby is a BIG start

May 1st
Reply

marlon cxxx

LOVE The TNYRD

Dec 31st
Reply

Noor Al Wattar

my favourite thing on the internet

Nov 9th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store