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The Next Picture Show

Author: Filmspotting Network

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A biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. Part of the Filmspotting family of podcasts.
170 Episodes
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#169: Muscled Memories, Pt. 2 - Captain Marvel
Our pairing of sci-fi action films with a side of meditation on memory and identity brings in the new CAPTAIN MARVEL to see how Carol Danvers’ journey of lost and reclaimed memories looks next to the very different (and much bloodier) journey taken by Douglas Quaid in Paul Verhoeven’s TOTAL RECALL. We share our reactions to CAPTAIN MARVEL and its choice to center its narrative on an amnesiac hero, then bring in TOTAL RECALL to compare the two films’ approaches to their central ideas about memory, how they function as science-fiction stories, how they treat their female characters, and more. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about TOTAL RECALL, CAPTAIN MARVEL, or anything else in the world of film by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. *Show Notes*Works cited:• Captain Marvel’s Cat Wrangler Explains How Goose Became a Flerken Hero on Set, by April Wolfe (Vulture.com)Your Next Picture Show: • Scott: Cristina Gallego and Ciro Guerra’s BIRDS OF PASSAGE, and Movie Premieres Unlimited (@NightOpening)• Keith: Robert Aldrich’s VERA CRUZ• Genevieve: Robbie Thompson and Niko Henrichon’s MEET THE SKRULLS comic, and FX’s WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWSOutro Music: Smashing Pumpkins, “Today”Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
#163: Chris Smith's Charismatic Dreamers, Pt. 2 - American Movie
Chris Smith’s new Netflix doc FYRE tells the story of huckster Billy McFarland and his doomed Fyre Festival as a compelling piece of meat-and-potatoes journalism that’s far from the verité of Smith’s portrait of Mark Borchardt in 1999’s AMERICAN MOVIE. But for all their surface differences, at heart FYRE is another movie about a charismatic leader who overpromises and under-delivers. After dissecting what FYRE shows us — and doesn’t show us — about McFarland’s history of scammy endeavors, we dig into what connects and separates Smith’s two protagonists in terms of their ambitions, their approaches, and their intent. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about AMERICAN MOVIE, FYRE, or anything else in the world of film by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.Show Notes / Works cited:• Fyre Fest Fiasco GoFundMe (gofundme.com/exuma-point-fyre-fest-debt)• Fyre Fight: The Inside Story of How We Got Two Warring Fyre Festival Documentaries in the Same Week, by Scott Tobias (TheRinger.com)• Amateurs, Con Artists, and Vanishing Movie Stars: Inside the World of Chris Smith’s Documentaries, by Scott Tobias (TheRinger.com)• The Best Movies That Lost Best Picture at the Oscars, by Keith Phipps (Vulture.com)Your Next Picture Show: • Keith: George Hill’s THE BIG HOUSE• Scott: Talal Derki’s OF FATHERS AND SONS• Genevieve: Jason Reitman’s TULLYOutro Music: Beth Ditto, “Fire”Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
#161: Enter the Shyamalaniverse, Pt. 2 - Glass
The evolution of a divisive auteur.We return once more to the Shyamalaniverse to dig into the culmination of the so-called Eastrail 177 trilogy, the new GLASS, which purports to be the thrilling conclusion of a story that began with 2000’s UNBREAKABLE. Has divisive auteur M. Night Shyamalan discovered a new trick up his sleeve, or is GLASS and its climactic parking lot fight yet another example of the diminishing returns that have plagued his filmography? After breaking down our reactions to GLASS, we bring in UNBREAKABLE to talk over what the films reveal about Shyamalan’s evolution, or lack thereof, what they have to say about the idea of determination vs. free will, and whether Shyamalan’s female characters will ever catch a break. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about UNBREAKABLE, GLASS, or any other corner of the Shyamalaniverse by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Your Next Picture Show: • Genevieve: Barry Jenkins’ IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK• Scott: Chris Smith’s COLLAPSE• Tasha: The Odd Splice podcast and Karyn Kusama’s DESTROYER and THE INVITATIONOutro Music: Annie Lennox, “Walking on Broken Glass”Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (8)

Martin Riggs

nice vocal fry.

Oct 22nd
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Rruben Rrz

los grey

Oct 7th
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Nunia Bizzness

dont even know how I ended up with this app. it, and this podcast sucks donkey balls

Oct 4th
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Jonathan Sandoval

w. non

Oct 3rd
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Jonathan Sandoval

CVCCC XXXXXXC . ? Q W X. X. .

Oct 3rd
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Mathew Moody

An aspect to the Coens that one of you very briefly touched on, but seems glaring to me, is their absolutely relentless use of religious symbolism. In A Serious Man, we have a modern version of a Job-esque story. In Hail, Ceasar, we can see a clear Christ figure in Eddie Mannix. Whether he is taking orders from an unseen boss somewhere unknown, fixing the lives of those put under his care, or having to choose the studio, i.e. fasting for forty days and forty nights, instead of choosing to give all that up and work for Lockhead, i.e Satan, to the literal mount of transfiguration in the studio amongst the set for Hail Ceasar, the Coens are using religious symbolism as one of the sharpest tool of their craft. I believe they had religious upbringings that lend a very clever and deep pengant for telling stories that everyone can relate to, in one way or another. Thanks for making a binge-worthy podcast for me to start from the beginning :)

Sep 30th
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Safiullah Sarwari

India

Sep 27th
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The One

I really like this podcast!

Sep 21st
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