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The Peter Attia Drive

Author: Peter Attia, MD

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Expert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.
140 Episodes
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In this episode, Peter sits down with his daughter to answer questions from her and other kids about COVID-19. We discuss: What is a virus? [1:45]; How did this version of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) start? [4:30]; How does COVID-19 compare to SARS and MERS (previous coronaviruses)? [6:00]; Will COVID-19 come back again after we resolve the current issue? [7:15]; When will kids go back to school? [7:45]; How has the US surpassed China in total cases, and how could we have been better prepared for this? [8:30]; Should have we started to quarantine sooner than we actually did? [11:45]; What about herd immunity? Would it be easier if we all just got the virus so we could be immune? [13:45]; Which age groups are the least and most at risk for getting a deadly version of the virus? [15:00]; Why do we have to wipe down packages that are delivered to our homes? [16:30]; How a lack of preparation and discipline led to this troubling situation [18:45]; Is China to blame for all of this? [24:15]; What did Olivia think when her parents pulled her out of school before it was mandated? [26:30]; What's been the hardest part of this for Olivia? [27:50]; What does Olivia appreciate now that she probably didn't appreciate in the past? [28:50]; How are Olivia’s zone 2 workouts going? [30:00]; and More Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/covid-19-for-kids Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
In this episode, originally recorded to be the 100th episode of The Drive, Peter discusses topics that he has changed his mind about since starting the podcast as a result of preparing for interviews as well as from the actual conversations. Peter also reviews some of his favorite moments from the first 99 episodes, shares what books he’s currently reading, and much more. Initially scheduled to be released as episode 100, this was delayed due to recent podcasts covering COVID-19. We discuss: Definition of “strong convictions loosely held,” and the value in trying to shoot down your own hypotheses [2:20]; Metformin—How Peter’s strong convictions have changed since 2018 [8:00]; Getting a dog—Why Peter caved and how it’s going so far [15:45]; Rapamycin—How Peter’s feelings have evolved, and the questions still needing to be answered [20:45]; Archery, the joy of pursuing mastery, and the importance of stillness [26:50]; Zone 2 training—Why Peter has made it a big component of his exercise regimen [37:30]; Deadlifts—Why Peter now believes it’s extremely beneficial to longevity when done properly [41:45]; Read any good books lately? [50:00]; Baby aspirin for preventing blood clotting—Why Peter no longer takes it, and a few alternative options [53:15]; Generic drugs—How and why Peter’s mind has shifted on generic drugs [55:45]; Omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA—How Peter’s long-held views have changed [58:15]; How Peter got better at saying “no” [1:02:30]; Does Peter have any favorite episodes of The Drive? [1:07:15]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/strong-convictions-loosely-held Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
In this episode, Michael Osterholm, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and author of Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, provides an overview on the COVID-19 pandemic in regards to what has happened to date, what we’ve learned about how the disease spreads, and his optimism and pessimism about what potentially lies ahead. Michael gives his take on the true case fatality rate, why it differs around the world, and which underlying conditions, such as obesity, impact risk of severe illness and death. We also discuss the outlook regarding vaccines, repurposed drugs/antivirals for treatment, and Michael’s growing concern about supply chain limitations with respect to drugs, vaccines, n95 masks, and testing kits. We discuss: Recapping the brief history of COVID-19 and what potentially lies ahead [2:15]; Some positive news about immunity and reinfection [10:45]; Case fatality rate—The challenge in finding the true rate, difference by country, and the impact of age, underlying conditions, and obesity [13:00]; What has to be true for less than 100,000 Americans to die from COVID-19? [24:30]; How do we best protect healthcare workers? [29:45]; Concerns about testing capability—Reagent shortfall and a supply chain problem [39:30]; Vaccines and antivirals—The outlook, timing, and challenges [47:45]; Long term health of survivors of COVID-19 [56:45]; The impact of comorbidities—Diabetes, obesity, and immunosuppressed patients [59:30]; Understanding R0 and how the disease spreads [1:01:30]; The challenge of forecasting with so many unknown [1:08:00]; What explains the difference in cases and fatalities in different parts of the world? [1:14:30]; Repurposed drugs/antivirals being considered for treatment options—any optimism? [1:16:45]; A parting message from Michael about what lies ahead [1:18:30]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/michaelosterholm Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Ryan Holiday, bestselling author and author of Daily Stoic, discusses practical ways to find stillness and apply the insights of stoic philosophy in the midst of COVID-19 chaos. Ryan discusses the importance of taking back a feeling of control, the benefits of structure and routine, and the idea of being prepared for anything. We discuss: Using times of adversity to evaluate and reflect how you’ve set up and prioritized your life [2:30]; What insights might the famous stoics provide amidst this COVID-19 pandemic? [8:15]; The possible consequences of the socially isolating nature of a pandemic (and why we need good leaders) [13:00]; Stoicism—what it means and how to apply it [18:45]; Lessons taken from the life of Winston Churchill—stillness, structure, routine, hobbies, empathy, forward thinking, and more [23:30]; Alive time vs. dead time—taking control of your time and making it count [38:45]; Auditing how the world (and its leaders) are handling the COVID-19 pandemic through the lens of stoic philosophy [44:15]; Asserting control and using routine to find stillness in an environment not conducive for it [52:15]; Why you should find a way to exercise, especially now [58:30]; How to find purpose during this time—goal setting, having a project to work on, and the benefits of keeping a journal [1:02:00]; What is Ryan most optimistic about and what is he most concerned about over the next few months? [1:08:45]; How can you follow Ryan’s work and messages about stoicism and stillness? [1:17:45]. And more. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/ryanholiday2 Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.  
In this episode, Sam Harris, neuroscientist, author, and host of the Making Sense Podcast, joins Peter to discuss this unprecedented coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. The discussion includes the important distinction between COVID-19 and influenza, the impact on the economy, the dire situation in New York, and the challenge of creating a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, Sam brings insights from his extensive meditation practice to help those struggling with stress, anxiety, and fear in this extraordinary situation. We discuss: A time unlike any other—why many people don’t seem to fully grasp the magnitude of this situation [2:00]; Why comparing COVID-19 to influenza is a bad analogy [10:45] The impact on the economy of measures like shelter-in-place—Is the “cure” worse than the disease? [16:45]; Why are some places, like New York, getting hit so much worse? [24:45]; The trickle down effect of an overrun healthcare system on non-COVID-19 related health issues [34:45]; How to calm our minds and manage our emotions during this craziness [38:00]; Talking to kids about this situation without burdening them with undue stress [50:15]; Insights from meditation practice—Recognize and unhook yourself from a heightened emotional state [52:00]; How to make the most of a situation where you let your emotions get the best of you [59:15]; What are some potential positive things that Sam hopes could be learned from this crisis and applied to the future? [1:09:30]; The unfortunate politics being layered on top of this crisis [1:15:30]; The challenge of creating a safe and effective vaccine for COVID-19 [1:20:00]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/samharris2 Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
In this episode, Dr. Peter Hotez M.D., Ph.D., Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine Baylor College of Medicine, returns to continue the conversation on COVID-19. Dr. Hotez informs us on how we can gauge the number of infected people, behaviors to reduce the probability of becoming infected, and the inconsistency of hospitalizations among young adults between different countries.  Dr. Hotez underscores the continued uncertainty in many virus-related developments, but ends with some points of optimism. Disclaimer: This is information accurate as of March 19, 2020, when it was recorded. We discuss: How to gauge true number of infected people [5:45] Reducing the probability of getting infected [22:45] Inconsistency by country in infected young people [27:15] Conferred immunity, seasonality, and repurposed therapeutics [30:30] Vaccine development [39:30] Practical behaviors to reduce risk of transmission [46:00] Mental Health resource and funding [51:00] Points of optimism [56:00]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/peterhotez-2 Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #47 – Matthew Walker, Ph.D., on sleep – Part I of III: Dangers of poor sleep, Alzheimer’s risk, mental health, memory consolidation, and more.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD 
In this episode, Dr. Paul Grewal, M.D. joins Peter to discuss what they have learned in the past week in the midst of the rapid changes surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. Their conversation touches on both optimism and uncertainty: actionable steps we can take to improve the situation with the understanding that it is too late for viral containment. Specifically, Peter and Paul discuss some promising drug treatment, reasons for isolating-behavior adoption, and what they are personally instituting in their own lives. Disclaimer: This is information accurate as of March 13, 2020, when it was recorded. We discuss: When the gravity of Coronavirus (COVID-19) hit home [04:30]; Hospitalization and ICU bed space as an issue [8:15]; Natural history and pathology of COVID-19 [12:00]; Potential drug therapies [22:00]; How thinking has changed from containment to management [30:00]; What Paul and Peter are doing [49:00]; What we know about viral transmission [57:00]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/covid-19-update-03152020/ Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
In this episode, Dr. Peter Hotez M.D., Ph.D., Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine Baylor College of Medicine, shares his expertise on viral disease and how it applies specifically to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the virus that causes it (SARS-CoV-2). Dr. Hotez informs us about the current state of disease progression, which has many unknowns, but has thus far been greatly determined by the delayed response time and lack of testing. Moreover, we discuss what we can do on a country, state, community, and individual level in order to collectively slow transmission of the disease. He shares with us a potential hope in convalescent plasma therapy and underscores the need for US federal involvement - particularly in the creation of a specialty task force to address areas of concern and unknowns. Disclaimer: This is information accurate as of March 13, 2020, when it was recorded. We discuss: The disease and the virus: transmissibility and lethality [04:30]; Disease transmission: US playing catch-up [12:00]; Convalescent plasma coronavirus therapy [16:00]; Remdesivir drug treatment and vaccination challenges [19:45]; Disease mechanism and reported pathology [27:45]; Most concerning geographic regions in the US [39:00]; Risk reduction [46:30]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode:  https://peterattiamd.com/peterhotez Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #37 – Zubin Damania, M.D.: Revolutionizing healthcare one hilariously inspiring video at a time.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD
In this episode, David Epstein, best-selling author of Range and The Sports Gene, discusses the evidence around the most effective ways to improve long-term performance and learning in our specialties, our sports, our careers, and our lives. David makes a compelling case that a range of experiences and skills are more likely to lead to expert performance compared to early specialization, and offers an in-depth critique of the much-publicized 10,000-Hour Rule. David also provides insights into our role as parents in the process of encouraging exposure to many things, the concepts of when to push them, when to give them space, and when to allow them to quit. Furthermore, David goes into many other fascinating topics such as the role of talent, genetics, and practice in reaching expert status, what differentiates a kind vs. wicked learning environment, the importance of “informal training,” and many case studies that suggest strategies for short-term success may not be best for long-term development. We discuss: A shared interest in Ayrton Senna, and pondering the value in participating in sports [2:30]; Examining the 10,000-Hour Rule, and the importance of questioning existing dogma [15:00]; How the medical profession is affected by bad science, and the importance of understanding individual variation [28:00]; David’s most surprising findings when writing The Sports Gene [35:45]; Kind versus wicked learning environments [40:45]; How and why strategies for short-term success may not be best for long-term development [47:30]; Contrasting the success stories of Tiger Woods and Roger Federer—which path is more common, and an argument for diversified training and experiences [59:15]; Is there an age-range or “critical window” during which exposure is necessary to reach a certain level of proficiency or mastery of a skill or knowledge? [1:14:00]; How diversifying your interests and unraveling your identity from your speciality could lead to more enjoyment and actually improve performance in your speciality [1:22:15]; The undervalued importance of “informal training” [1:29:15]; Advice for increasing match quality in your work—where interests and abilities align—to optimize both job performance and fulfillment [1:41:15]; Would David want his own son to attend college given the current state of higher education? [1:51:15]; The role of a parent—how to encourage sampling, when to push them, when to allow them to quit, and insights from the childhoods of Tiger Woods and Wolfgang Mozart [1:55:45]; The need for varied perspectives and the ability to improvise—insights gained from the Space Shuttle Challenger tragedy [2:08:45]; How a diversified background and identity could be the difference in life or death—the Hotshot firefighters case study [2:22:15]; David’s takeaways from the inspiring story of Frances Hesselbein [2:29:00]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/davidepstein Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #52 – Ethan Weiss, M.D.: A masterclass in cardiovascular disease and growth hormone – two topics that are surprising interrelated.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD
In this episode, Luke Bennett, Medical and Sports Performance Director for Hintsa Performance, explains the ins and outs of Formula 1 with a focus on the behind-the-scenes human element, and what makes it so emotionally, cognitively, and physically demanding for the drivers as well as the many team members. Luke first talks about his fascinating background with the Royal Flying Doctor Service in Australia, which lead to his current position with Hintsa working closely with F1 drivers to improve their health and performance despite jet-lag and sleep constraints due to an unrivaled travel schedule. Luke also sheds light on the underappreciated level of sheer physical strength and endurance it takes to drive an F1 car combined with the extreme cognitive aptitude, spatial awareness, and ability to navigate a socially complex environment that is needed to be successful as a driver. Additionally, Luke gives an overview of how the F1 season and races work, the incredible advances in car technology and safety measures, and what Luke and Hintsa hope to bring in the near future to the unique and special sport that is Formula 1. We discuss: What it’s like to be a “flying doctor” in Australia, and how Luke ended up working in Formula 1 with Hintsa [3:10]; Behind the scenes of Formula 1—crazy travel, jet lag, massive teams, and fascinating human storylines [10:45]; The incredible physical strength and cognitive aptitude needed to be a F1 driver [19:00]; The technological leap to hybrid electric engines [29:30]; The trend towards younger drivers in F1 [32:30]; Advancements in safety—the history and recent upgrades [36:00]; How Hintsa manages the athletes through the incredible social complexity of the sport [41:45]; Explaining the difference between F1, F2, F3, and F4, and the path to reaching the F1 [47:30]; Comparing F1 in the 60s & 70s to today—Incidences of deaths, number of crashes, physicality of driving, new regulations, and more [53:45]; Women in F1—Past, present, and future [1:06:10]; How F1 teams manage their cars and engine over the season, & some new regulations coming in 2021 [1:09:15]; What insights has Luke taken from his time as a triathlete to working with F1 drivers? [1:12:50]; How Luke survived cancer, and gained an increased sense of empathy [1:15:45]; How Luke manages his health against the brutal travel and lifestyle that comes with working in Formula 1 [1:19:40]; New training techniques, technology to monitor the physiology of drivers, and other things Luke is hoping to bring to Formula 1 [1:22:40]; How long does it take a driver to learn a new circuit? [1:27:45]; The incredible emotional control needed to be a successful F1 driver [1:30:00]; Which F1 teams are showing signs of competing in future seasons? [1:32:15]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/lukebennett Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #05 – Dom D’Agostino, Ph.D.: ketosis, n=1, exogenous ketones, HBOT, seizures, and cancer.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD 
In this episode, Mark Hyman, M.D., director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine and the author of Food Fix, discusses that if we can fix the food system, we can solve many big problems—namely the chronic disease/obesity epidemic, the rising costs of healthcare, as well as the big problems facing the environment. Mark first briefly lays out the health consequences of processed food with a focus on the gut microbiome. From there, Mark discusses the environmental consequences of industrial farming and lays out how we can affect change on the individual level, through policy and regulations, and perhaps most importantly through regenerative agriculture. Additionally, Mark talks about the potential health risks of consuming GMO foods, herbicides, and other chemicals used in industrial farming as well as the environmental consequences, such as the loss of soil, caused by those same fertilizers and methods of farming. We discuss: The negative consequences of the existing food environment [3:25]; What makes processed food so unhealthy? [9:00]; The gut microbiome: Inflammation from gut permeability and how to measure gut health [18:30]; Steps to fixing a bad gut—The Five R’s [24:30]; Some staggering health statistics, and which races might be more genetically susceptible [27:15]; An argument for government regulations and policies to fight back against a massive food industry with unlimited resources (and what we can learn from the tobacco story) [29:00]; Industrial farming and climate change: The degradation of soil and use of fertilizer [41:45]; Regenerative agriculture: Could it be the answer to food waste, our health problems, and the environment? [51:45]; Comparing the Impossible Burger to regeneratively raised beef [1:06:00]; GMO and Roundup—The potential health risks of consuming GMO foods sprayed with Roundup (glyphosate) and other herbicides and pesticides [1:08:15]; How the livelihood of farmers are being affected by big ag companies and the current industrial farming system [1:16:30]; The loss of biodiversity in our food, and what “organic” really means [1:19:00]; What can people do on the individual level to protect themselves as well as affect change to the toxic food system? [1:25:00]; What role does the USDA play in this “toxic” food environment and how do we fix it? [1:30:15]; The top 3 changes Mark would make if he was “food czar” [1:35:15]; Mark’s rebuttal against the argument that it’s best for the environment if we stop farming animals and move to a fully plant-based diet (and his argument for “agriculture 2.0") [1:36:30]; What is Mark’s overall mission with the work that he’s doing? [1:40:30]; Bread in the US vs. Europe: Why does bread (and wheat products) taste different and potentially cause less health problems in Europe versus the US? [1:42:00]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/markhyman Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #34 – Sam Harris, Ph.D.: The transformative power of mindfulness.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD 
In my first interview with Jason Fried, Jason explained his overall philosophy about work-life balance and how exactly he optimizes for efficiency. For this special follow-up AMA, we've decided to release the full episode to everyone (including non-subscribers), so all can hear Jason answer questions from listeners that dive deeper into topics such as work-life balance, the role of luck versus hard work in success, specifics around Basecamp’s unique process-oriented approach to projects, 4-day work weeks, practical tips for people searching for the right company culture, tips on writing and parenting, and a whole bunch more. If Jason had taken his own advice about work-life balance at the start of his career, would he have achieved the same level of success? [2:05]; What is Jason’s definition of success, and what is he optimizing for? [10:10]; Basecamp’s policy on email and expectations for a quick response, and why Jason believes in sleeping on big decisions [14:30]; How Jason implements “true” work-life balance in his life and at Basecamp [19:15]; Does work and life have to be separated in order to have balance? [32:00]; How Jason makes time the fixed component to avoid the compulsion to keep pushing forward on a project perpetually [34:15]; Jason’s tip for physicians who may be facing burnout [45:00]; Signs of “burnout” if you do the same thing for work and pleasure, and tips to avoid and manage that feeling [49:45]; Is a 40-hour work week the correct amount? [53:45]; How to evaluate a company’s culture when looking for a job with the right work environment [59:00]; Jason’s take on salaries and alternate incentives like equity, profit sharing, etc. [1:06:45]; What traits does Jason look for when hiring new employees? [1:13:45]; Does Jason believe in process-oriented work or outcome-driven work, and Basecamp’s unique process for completing projects [1:16:15]; How does Jason handle a project that results in a failure? [1:20:00]; Advice for people in situations where they don’t have full control of their time and work demands [1:23:50]; How much of success should be attributed to skill versus luck? [1:29:30]; The importance of writing skills, and tip to improve your writing [1:43:15]; Lessons learned from parenting, and Peter’s top priority when it comes to raising kids [1:52:15]; An important skill: the ability to say “no” to things [2:01:15]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/jasonfriedama Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.  
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #04 – AMA #1: alcohol, best lab tests, wearables, finding the right doc, racing, and more.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD 
In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter explains the various levers one can pull to affect longevity with a specific focus on the strategies and tactics one can implement that do not require the help of a physician. Once again, Bob Kaplan, Peter's head of research, will be asking the questions. If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA. If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on your private RSS feed or on our website at the AMA #12 show notes page. We discuss: The five levers you can pull to affect longevity [1:15]; Nutritional biochemistry: Framework, 3 nutritional interventions, and how to approach your goals, and what you should be tracking [4:30]; Exercise for brain health, and the 4 components of exercise [20:45]; Exercise component—Stability [24:30]; Exercise component—Strength [29:00]; What is Peter optimizing for with his exercise? [30:30]; Exercise components—Zone 2 and zone 5 training [33:15]; More about DNS, and why we need to be careful with rushing kids through neuromuscular development stages [45:00]; Sleep: How to improve quantity and quality [48:15]; and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode:  https://peterattiamd.com/AMA12 Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.
Today's episode of The Qualys is from podcast #03 – Ron Krauss, M.D.: a deep dive into heart disease.   The Qualys is a subscriber-exclusive podcast, released Tuesday through Friday, and published exclusively on our private, subscriber-only podcast feed. Qualys is short-hand for “qualifying round,” which are typically the fastest laps driven in a race car—done before the race to determine starting position on the grid for race day. The Qualys are short (i.e., “fast”), typically less than ten minutes, and highlight the best questions, topics, and tactics discussed on The Drive. Occasionally, we will also release an episode on the main podcast feed for non-subscribers, which is what you are listening to now. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/podcast/qualys/   Subscribe to receive access to all episodes of The Qualys (and other exclusive subscriber-only content): https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/  Connect with Peter on Facebook.com/PeterAttiaMD | Twitter.com/PeterAttiaMD | Instagram.com/PeterAttiaMD
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Comments (74)

Maureen Hubbell

what about advising DNR orders

Apr 2nd
Reply

Laurent Roumieu

around 50' you talk about a supplement to lower down cortisol, I couldn't catch the name. what is it please?

Mar 19th
Reply

Jakaira candland

Great podcast

Jan 31st
Reply

Stu Sheridan

Brilliant episode. What a likeable and smart guy Dom is.

Jan 29th
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Chris Wilson

what an awesome podcast!

Dec 6th
Reply (1)

Jason Thomas

$15 a month subscription. That's more than Netflix.. no thanks

Oct 28th
Reply

Jason Thomas

6:50

Oct 28th
Reply

Pedro Corpuz

Great episode!

Oct 27th
Reply (1)

Jason Thomas

the volume fluctuations through this pod are so look annoying 🤨

Sep 25th
Reply (1)

Jason Thomas

3:57

Sep 25th
Reply

Chris Greive

thanks! My dad died of Alzheimer's so all info from experts is massively appreciated.

Sep 20th
Reply

Richard Ledyard

oh. my. God.

Sep 17th
Reply

fragelicious

That's the recipe for obscurity. Your brand will be limited.

Aug 24th
Reply

fragelicious

You said that the listeners that cant afford the subsciption would still be able to hear the podcast. Three restricted 'Qualies' in a row?

Aug 24th
Reply (1)

Tamás Payer

OMG! One of the bests I have ever heard! Must listen multiple times...

Aug 15th
Reply

Grant Robbins

One of the best podcast episodes I've heard

Aug 13th
Reply (1)

Xtian Dassa

avoid the last 30 min of this one. just car talk

Jul 27th
Reply

Jun Huh

this one is only 13 mins long :/

Jul 22nd
Reply (1)

konkistador90

Very useful podcast, thank you for that

Jul 19th
Reply

JACK SPARROW

great topic, my dad had diffused type b cell lymphoma stage 3 and is in remission now. then last year was confronted with a throat cancer, had it cut out thank god we got it early. the best cure is early detection.

Jul 15th
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