DiscoverThe Pitchfork Review
The Pitchfork Review

The Pitchfork Review

Author: Pitchfork & Condé Nast

Subscribed: 17,428Played: 142,921
Share

Description

The Pitchfork Review is the music podcast you've always wanted, from the most trusted voice in music. Join host Puja Patel, Pitchfork's Editor-in-Chief, as we dig deep into the week's best new music and rising artists, plus all the industry news and culture you need to know. Peek behind the curtain of Pitchfork and dive into our team’s music-nerd brains. Listen to The Pitchfork Review, and hear music differently. Subscribe to The Pitchfork Review to get new episodes every Friday at midnight.

30 Episodes
Reverse
Introducing Checking In, the advice podcast where we answer real health and wellness questions from real people like you. Hosted by SELF’s Editor in Chief, Carolyn Kylstra, and featuring trusted experts, doctors, therapists, thought leaders, and even a few celebrities, we’re diving deep into what it really means to be healthy. Checking In launches on Monday, November 16th, with new episodes releasing weekly. Subscribe to get episodes right when they drop at 6:00 am EST. Listen to Checking In here: Apple Podcasts: http://listen.self.com/self-apple Spotify: http://listen.self.com/self-spotify Stitcher: http://listen.self.com/self-stitcher Or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Everything else aside, 2020 was a banner year for music. In addition to some truly stellar albums and songs, there was also plenty of sillier stuff to dig into: misguided anthems about the pandemic, casual covers and collaborations, good and bad tweets galore, and of course, Bernie Sanders introducing the Strokes and Soccer Mommy. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by Associate Editor Anna Gaca and News Editor Matthew Strauss for a senior superlatives-style rundown of the best and worst in these categories and more. Thanks for listening to the Pitchfork Review this year! We’ll be back with new episodes in 2021. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Fiona Apple’s Fetch the Bolt Cutters isn’t just the best album of 2020, it’s the sort of masterpiece that defines an entire era. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by Contributing Editor Jenn Pelly, who wrote Pitchfork’s 10 Fetch the Bolt Cutters review and spent the year in communication with Apple for a series of follow-up pieces, and Features Editor Ryan Dombal, who wrote Pitchfork’s previous 10 review a decade ago—for Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy—and worked closely with Pelly on her Apple coverage. The three discuss the brilliance of Fetch the Bolt Cutters, and Apple’s unorthodox approach to making it; as well as the process of deciding that an album should receive a perfect score, and what a 10 really means.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
We’re excited to bring you a bonus episode from Vogue’s new podcast, In Vogue: The 1990s. If you miss the 90s for all its nostalgia, music, and culture, you're going to love this episode on hip hop. Music and fashion have always had a symbiotic relationship, but not until the emergence of hip hop did we see the direct influence of music and music-makers on the fashion industry—and vice versa. This episode is a culmination of the cultural prominence of hip hop, from Dapper Dan’s Harlem Boutique to Tupac walking in a Versace show in Milan. We examine how Hip Hop shook up the fashion world in the 90's and eventually went on to take back its representation. Featuring interviews with Missy Elliot, LL Cool J, Kelly Rowland, Salt N Pepa, Dapper Dan, Daymond John, and more.... If you like what you hear, subscribe to In VOGUE: The 1990s now on your preferred podcast app: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1526206712 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4uJdNOg4EtQAqlnfxLo7wX Or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
In the latest installment of our year-end podcast coverage, we’re talking about 2020’s best rock and rap albums. Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by News Editor Evan Minsker, Contributing Editor Jayson Greene, and Staff Writers Alphonse Pierre and Madison Bloom, who argue in favor of their personal favorites, from Yves Tumor and U.S. Girls to Westside Gunn and Jay Electronica. They also get into some broader discussions about the state of the genres more generally, including: Which old heads or new kids ruled rap in 2020? And what does “rock” even mean these days?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
This week we're lending our podcast feed to our friends at WIRED. In this episode of Get WIRED, as protests filled the streets this summer, WIRED Senior Writer Jason Parham went looking for radio broadcasts from 1992, when he watched Los Angeles go up in flames. What he found instead was a trove of broadcasts from throughout his 1990s coming of age, archived by a French YouTuber. Parham goes on to talk with cultural critic Jace Clayton, also known as DJ Rupture, about how the move from analog to digital has changed our relationship to music. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
We’re bringing you a bonus episode from Vogue’s new podcast, In Vogue: The 1990s. The 90s was influenced by fashion, music, innovation, and countercultures. From major fashion fundraisers to Madonna’s Vogue video, the 90s was a decade of queer visibility unlike ever before. But the road to acceptance was a rocky one. When the glamour of the 70s and the first gay pride parades glorified sexual liberation, fashion reflected the sensuality on the runways and magazines. But when the AIDS crisis of the 80s started killing thousands of gay and trans people, queer expression. was shadowed by the threat of the disease and the discrimination that came with it. By the 90s, the fashion community rallied around the queer community and began to acknowledge queer influence and inspiration within the industry. Hear interviews from Jose Extravaganza, Kimberly Jenkins, Tom Ford, Susanne Bartsch, Michael Kors, Lady Bunny, Dr. Valerie Steele, Lea DeLaria, Robin Givhan, and Kenneth Cole. If you like what you hear, subscribe to In VOGUE: The 1990s now on your preferred podcast app: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1526206712 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4uJdNOg4EtQAqlnfxLo7wX Or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Over the last several years, American listeners have grown more and more attuned to the sounds of West African pop music—also known as Afrobeats–whether it’s the swaggering Nigerian Afro-fusion of Burna Boy, the playfully genre-bending anthems of Ghanaian-American singer Amaarae, or the enthusiastic dabbling of stateside superstars like Drake and Diplo. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by Nigerian journalist Joey Akan, publisher of the Afrobeats Intelligence newsletter, and Mankaprr Conteh, Pitchfork Editorial Operations Associate, for a discussion about the music’s global rise and the West’s complicated rush to embrace it, as well as the fraught nature of the term “Afrobeats” itself.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Building Pitchfork’s year-end lists of the best albums and songs is a lengthy and painstaking process, involving careful consideration of the 1,000-plus releases we review each year, and others we may have missed. We include innumerable factors in our decision-making, but sometimes it’s a matter of following instincts: with a gun to your head, which would you choose? On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by Reviews Editor Jeremy Larson and Contributing Editor Andy Cush for some good-natured arguments about which songs by some of our favorite artists—like Waxahatchee, Phoebe Bridgers, Destroyer, and Moses Sumney—should make the cut this year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
We’re excited to bring you a bonus episode from Vogue’s new podcast, In Vogue: The 1990s. If you miss the 90s for all its nostalgia, music, and culture, you're going to love this episode on grunge. The 90s brought a backlash to the lingering decadence of the 80s. This was the birth of grunge. As supermodels rose to prominence, so did this counterculture, which emphasized anti-fashion and rejection of superficiality. Music and fashion were fused together through this movement. Hear from Anna Wintour, Hamish Bowles, Marc Jacobs, Anna Sui, Grace Coddington, Megan Jasper and more heavyweights in this first-of-its-kind docu-series. If you like what you hear, subscribe to In VOGUE: The 1990s now on your preferred podcast app: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1526206712 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4uJdNOg4EtQAqlnfxLo7wX Or wherever you get your podcasts. See Marc Jacobs' 1993 Spring/Summer collection for Perry Ellis here. For more on this week’s episode and to access additional Vogue content, make sure to visit vogue.com/podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
A few months ago, we launched the Pitchfork Request Line, asking listeners to call in with requests for music to soundtrack whatever is going on in their lives. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is answering your requests along with Contributing Editors Rawiya Kameir and Philip Sherburne. They take calls from a midwestern transplant who’s nostalgic for her suburban D.C. hometown, a Mancunian looking to recapture the feeling of his city’s famously vibrant live music scene, and a father who’s teaching his kids music history by way of Willie Nelson. They also discuss the music they’ve been turning to for comfort during a difficult year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
In a year of historic protests, on the eve of a critical election, we’ve been thinking a lot about the place of music in movements for social and political change. In this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel speaks with Jason King, professor at NYU and founding faculty member of the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, and Allison Hussey, Pitchfork Associate Staff Writer, about the changing role of protest music across American history, from 19th-century Black spirituals to Public Enemy, Lady Gaga, and Janelle Monáe. They also touch on the secret history of a Bob Dylan classic, and the new ways pop stars have engaged with activism in the social media era. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
A global pandemic hasn’t slowed the prolific output of Adrianne Lenker, who released her gorgeous solo collections songs and instrumentals this week, not long after making two of 2019’s most celebrated albums with her band Big Thief. On this episode, Lenker chats with Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel about the music that accompanied her occasionally turbulent journey from childhood as a musical prodigy to adulthood as one of her generation’s greatest songwriters. She touches on an early fascination with jazz guitarist Pat Metheny, a teenage encounter with the songs of Elliott Smith, and the story behind her Leonard Cohen tattoo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
This week we're lending our podcast feed to our friends at WIRED. In this episode of Get WIRED, you’ll hear from games writer and video game music expert Dia Lacina. Dia recently discovered an old photograph of a group of women composers, and set out to learn more about them—what they worked on, what inspired them, and how their early work helped create a lasting legacy in video game music. From Bach to Top Gun, from 8-bit to the orchestra, the episode takes you on a journey through sounds you probably still recognize and the women who made them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
What is hyperpop? A movement? A meaningless label? A Spotify playlist? Whatever the answer, it surely has something to do with 100 gecs, the duo of Laura Les and Dylan Brady, whose songs sometimes sound like the last three decades of popular music happening all at once. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel interviews Les and Brady about their conflicted relationship to the genre they’ve come to embody, as well as their influences—ranging from PC Music to Lil Wayne to John Zorn to Britney Spears—and a new wave of artists who are taking their cues from gecs themselves.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
It’s been six months since the live music industry operated under any semblance of normalcy in the U.S., thanks to COVID-19. Which means most of us haven’t seen a proper show in at least that long. When will concerts come back, and what needs to happen before they do? Are outdoor events and reduced-capacity venues safe and financially viable options? Can a livestream really match the energy of an in-person performance? On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by two veterans of putting on shows—Kristen Kaza, co-founder of Chicago’s beloved Slo ‘Mo series of queer dance parties, and Adam Krefman, Pitchfork’s own Executive Director of Festivals—to discuss those questions, as well as their own experiences with navigating the pandemic’s challenges Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
This week brought new albums from a pair of beloved artists who emerged a little over a decade ago as purveyors of artful indie folk: Fleet Foxes, who announced their fourth full-length Shore on Monday and released it 24 hours later, and Sufjan Stevens, whose eighth solo album The Ascension arrives today, September 25. Each has navigated listeners’ weighty expectations in their own way: Fleet Foxes by eschewing promotion and embracing the vibrant simplicity of their early songwriting, and Stevens by avoiding the character sketches and personal narratives of his past albums in favor of broader questions about the state of the world. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by Features Editor Ryan Dombal and News Editor Matthew Strauss for a discussion of both albums and the artists who made them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Next month, Matt Berninger of The National will release Serpentine Prison, his first solo album, produced by the legendary Memphis multi-instrumentalist Booker T. Jones. On this episode, Berninger chats with Pitchfork Staff Writer Sam Sodomsky about the songs that shaped him as a musician and informed the new album, touching on his childhood infatuation with Olivia Newton-John, The Smiths and U2 records he blasted while getting pelted with golf balls at his first job, and The National’s early aspirations to emulate the Silver Jews. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
For years, Enya’s music was treated as a cultural punchline, the eerily soothing soundtrack to countless crystal shops and Pure Moods commercials. But lately, a new generation of artists—from Weyes Blood to Nicki Minaj—is proudly claiming the misunderstood Irish auteur as an influence. On this episode, Pitchfork Editor Puja Patel is joined by Contributing Editor Jenn Pelly, a recently converted Enya fanatic, for a discussion about the depth and complexity of Enya’s artistry and the ways she maintained creative control of her music and image in a male-dominated industry. Next week, Pitchfork will publish Pelly’s longform written feature on Enya's blooming influence in 2020, featuring interviews with many of the artists who look to her as a guiding light. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
After its launch a few weeks ago, the Pitchfork Request Line is still ringing off the hook with listeners calling in for recommendations of music to soundtrack their lives. This week, we’re taking requests from an aspiring metalhead, a road tripper making a move from Los Angeles to San Francisco, and someone who just wants to get the hell out of 2020, if only for the length of a song.  If you want to get a recommendation of your own, give us a call at (917) 524-7371 and tell us a story about what’s going on in your life right now.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
loading
Comments (3)

Tracy Lee

WAP!

Jan 9th
Reply

Tracy Lee

comin!

Oct 30th
Reply

Helen O'Beirne

this was so good can't wait for more

Jul 31st
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store