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The Running for Real Podcast with Tina Muir
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The Running for Real Podcast with Tina Muir

Author: Tina Muir, Running4Real

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Who can I trust for the best running tips? How do I make myself mentally tougher? How do I stop comparing myself to other runners, and instead, build my confidence? And of course, How can I get faster while also enjoying my running more? Welcome to The Running For Real Podcast where we will answer these questions and many more! Every week, 2:36 marathon runner and mom Tina Muir will bring you sports psychologists, doctors, scientists, dietitians, elite runners, strength training coaches, running form experts, and of course, everyday runners with inspiring stories to motivate you and help YOU run YOUR best! Tina shares tangible tips and hacks that she used to reach her potential as a runner and build that runner grit to be your best. Along with sharing her best kept secrets, and postpartum journey, she interviews the best in the industry (Kara Goucher, Dean Karnazes, Dr. Rich Willy, Sally Bergesen, Manal Rostom, Chrissie Wellington, Jared Ward and many more) who will share their best advice and be real with you in a way you have never heard before. With over a million downloads and counting, the Running For Real Community is getting bigger every day. It is YOUR TURN to hear from the experts, get inspired, and reach your biggest goals. Ready? Let’s get started my friend!
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Christie Aschwanden: Science Is Not An Answer, It's A Process -R4R 102
The Best Recovery for Runners Becoming a better runner is simple in theory. Run hard so muscles break down, then rest so those muscles repair and become stronger. Everything gets more complicated when we try to pinpoint the exact amount of time recovery should be, what foods we should eat, and when we should eat them. Do ice baths really work? How about massages? Surely with all the research we have today we should have the answers, right? Well, yes and no. Again, we know the basics of recovery. We know that recovery is necessary to improve, that certain whole foods are generally better than refined and processed foods. We know sleep is important, and that anxiety and stress slow the recovery process. However, proving that specific techniques are beneficial to every runner’s recovery is difficult. Christie Aschwanden, athlete, journalist, and scientific method enthusiast, is a recent author of the book “Good to Go.” In her book Christie both debunks and confirms recovery techniques that have been coached for many years. Listen to today’s “Running for Real” podcast or read on to learn more about what recovery methods are tried and true. Do Your Research One of the most difficult aspects of determining the best recovery techniques is measuring recovery. Even defining recovery can be difficult. In most cases, recovery is measured by performance, which is variable even when recovery is exactly the same. Aschwanden says that the best way to measure recovery is by just asking the athlete, “How are you feeling?” Athletes that are really tuned in to how their body is feeling are best at finding recovery methods that work for them. "Science is not an answer,” says Christie, “It’s a process.” The very art of the scientific method is narrowing down what is true by finding things that are not true. It takes a long time and a lot of results to come to any conclusions. This means that we shouldn’t trust everything we hear, and we shouldn’t take ourselves or any particular recovery method too seriously. Take the time to read multiple opinions on various recovery topics before forming too strong of an opinion. Chances are that for every article you read on the benefits of “this or that” there is another article debunking that exact method. Sleep Christie says that the first, second, and third most important recovery techniques are sleep, sleep and sleep. “Everything else is minuscule by comparison,” she says, “If you’re not getting enough sleep there is just no way that your recovery will be optimal.” Sleep is when your body makes all its physiological repairs. It’s the time when your mind and body totally relax so that it can focus on recovery. Sleep ought to be a priority for anyone serious about getting better at their sport. Just like you would never miss a workout or a meal, you shouldn’t miss a full night’s sleep. This does not always come easy. Sleep is often the one thing that we reduce in order to fit everything else in. If something goes amiss in our schedule, it’s usually the first thing to go. Getting the sleep you need can take serious effort, but it is worth every minute. There are several ways you can make your sleep sacred. Deciding to put phones and other screens away 45 minutes before bedtime and creating a dark and peaceful environment (as much as possible) are great ways to begin. If you have a hard time falling asleep try using a meditation or sleep app before going to bed. Whatever it takes, getting your sleep will pay off. Do What Feels Good Apart from sleep, Christie suggests two other recovery techniques that often get overlooked. (1) Find a way to reduce stress and (2) find a recovery ritual. Recovery is very individually because the amount of stress we have in our lives is unique. Stress cannot always be eliminated, but it can be managed. Stress is detrimental to the healing process, and managing it will help your body and mind recover more quickly. Lastly, find a recovery ritual that is customized for you. Whether it’s a warm bath, a mindless soap opera, or a compression blanket, find something that signals to your mind and body that it is time to unwind and relax. Recovery is serious. It is important. It is also important that recovery isn’t stressful. So make time in your schedule to recover and then forget about the world. Taking recovery seriously in a not-so-serious way is exactly what you need to repair and improve. Resources: (Book) Good to Go Christie’s Twitter Christie’s Website Emerging Form Podcast Camille Herron’s Twitter   My new book is out in the world! You can purchase a copy of Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends, I couldn't of done any of this without you all!! Secondly, I am conducting a survey, to figure out how to serve you better. If you have a few minutes, it will help both of us to being in the same place, but won't take long. I would love to learn from you. Find the survey here.   Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today's episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Christie, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Nick Anderson: How to Structure Your Marathon Training -R4R 101
Take Your Marathon Time to the Next Level When it comes to running a race as long as the marathon, each small improvement can make a big difference. There are a multitude of areas to improve on: posture, nutrition, training, mental preparation and attire just to name a few.  This week on the Running for Real podcast, we interviewed Nick Anderson. Nick has been a coach to a variety of runners, beginners and Olympians alike. More recently Nick has coached the Great Britain team in the world half marathon. He founded “Running With Us” and helps to coach many to get to the next level. Nick is also part of a team that helps runners that are a tier below certain Olympic or Commonwealth qualifying times and helps them get to that standard. He says that although these athletes may be training more than casual runners, the principles are the same for all levels of marathon runners. “The basics are still the same,” says Nick, “We are looking at making sure the right type of recovery running, running economy work, and long runs are being structured correctly and that the athlete knows how to look after themselves.”  Whether you are just planning your second marathon, a first-time Boston qualifier or an Olympic hopeful, Nick has some good advice for you in today’s podcast. The “Long Run” Isn’t the Only Important Run Doing a long run every Sunday or once every ten days is a common way to train for a marathon. This is a pretty crucial run. Your body can never be prepared to run a marathon if it doesn’t get used to some long runs. However, this is definitely not the only workout that matters, and there are several ways to help your body be prepared for 26.2. Maintaining correct form and avoiding cramps comes from strength training. This can include doing hills runs, speed work, or getting in the gym. Strength training is more than just getting sweaty and tired in a gym workout. Nick says that it is important that the right muscle groups are being activated and strengthened. Take the time to find a physical trainer who understands weights for a runner and the biomechanics and correct posture needed. You won’t regret it. “I would really spend a little bit of money on that one,” says Nick. What about learning how to run tired? A great way to simulate running on tired legs is to begin by running 5 miles at a marathon pace, then running 5 miles at your 10k pace and finish by running the last 5 at marathon pace again. This way you can prepare your mind and body to run on tired legs without having the fatigue of running over 20 miles. Make sure to do some strength training, some threshold training, some long runs, and some recovery runs. Each one has their purpose and will play a role in your improved marathon times.  Adapt and Recover Nick compares training for a marathon to climbing Mount Everest. When you train to climb Mount Everest you first spend several weeks at base camp. Acclimating here can be compared to the base amount of training you do for your marathon. This can mostly be mindless work, just putting in the miles and getting your body used to running in general. Once a climber is acclimated, they move up to the next base and spend some time there before coming back to the base camp to recover. They complete this process a handful of times, going up a bit further, and coming back down a camp or two. This is exactly what a marathoner needs to do during training. Long and hard runs are great, but without proper recovery, the body can’t adapt.  “You get fitter through adapting,” says Nick, “You don’t get fitter through just doing more training.” Nick’s opinion is that to get the most out of a hard run, you need to be recovered from the last run. This is how the body can adapt; teach your body how to take it to the next level and avoid burning out. We Are All Performance Runners It is easy to think of yourself as only a casual or even unaccomplished runner. But Don’t! Nick reminds us that anyone who has a desire to improve their running is a performance runner. Be proud of that. You are a performance runner.  Embrace the fact that you want to improve, and find ways to do so. Allow yourself to recover more fully. Pay for some strength training sessions. Train smart, not just hard. Adapt. These changes will take your running to the next level. YOU are a performance runner. Resources: Running With Us Running With Us Instagram Running With Us Facebook Running With Us Twitter Nick’s Twitter Steve Magness Twitter Eliud Kipchoge Instagram   Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | My new book is out in the world! You can purchase a copy of Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends, I couldn’t of done any of this without you all!! Secondly, I am conducting a survey, to figure out how to serve you better. If you have a few minutes, it will help both of us to being in the same place, but won’t take long. I would love to learn from you. Find the survey here. Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Nick, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
EPISODE 100: Tina Muir and Sarah Crouch -R4R 100
Somehow it is here, episode 100 of the Running For Real Podcast, and today, you have a special episode to celebrate that. I thought about bringing on a big time guest, but that has been done by every other podcast, and one thing about Running For Real is that it is exactly that, REAL. So, I thought I would give you a REAL conversation between two friends who are catching up. I recently won the Walt Disney World Half Marathon, and my book, Overcoming Amenorrhea is now out in the world. These are the most popular running podcast episodes, and you always request more, so hopefully you enjoy this chat between friends, and feel like you have two running buddies with you on your run today. When you run alone every day, it can be a lonely running existence, I hope this episode makes you feel a part of something. Let’s celebrate! Resources: Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. Snoogle Pillow for Pregnancy Hypnobabies blog post Hypnobabies materials  Tina’s Website Tina’s Twitter Tina’s Instagram Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio The wonderful sponsor for this episode is ME about my new book. Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back.  My new book is out in the world! You can purchase a copy of Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. here. Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Sarah, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Renee McGregor: A New You Is More Than Just Healthy Eating-R4R 099
Food is More than Fuel Welcome to the end of January. Crazy resolutions, goals, and expectations have hopefully run out the door and you can finally get back to being you. The “new year, new me” effect is slowly wearing off, and pressure to be something that you aren’t is fading away. Don’t get it mixed up. You still want to be better. You want to be in a better place physically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually than you’ve been in the past. But the façade of being a different person isn’t what is going to get you there. It’s time to give yourself permission to be true to who you really are. Accept who you are, love who you are, and you will be on a fast track to changing what you want to change. Somehow food is always in the mix around this time of year. Maybe you look forward to a few “cheat days” around the holidays when you can forget about your diet and dive into the desserts. For some of you, there will be a feeling of guilt associated with the holidays. Gaining a few pounds might feel like more than a few pounds to you.  But it’s not. This is normal. You are okay. For many athletes, the notion of “food is fuel” is common. Reaching for physical goals can make us look at food in a different way. But food has always been more than fuel, and not just for aspiring chefs and Michelin Star seekers. Food brings people together. It is a way to celebrate, to relax, and to have fun. Food is memories. I’m positive that you can relate multiple memories back to making or eating foods. If this is the case, then we should do everything we can to create a positive relationship with the food we eat. It gives us strength and enjoyment, and for that, it should be celebrated. Orthorexia What is Orthorexia? When you think of eating disorders, eating lots of vegetables, or consistent meal-prepping, rarely crosses your mind. Orthorexia is an obsession with eating healthy foods. People that seem on top of their diet, the ones that know how close they are to hitting their macros for the week and how many grams of sodium are in a can of soup, are usually praised and congratulated. This is exactly why orthorexia is difficult to combat. As a newborn, each of us is born with instinctive eating cues that we follow perfectly. Newborns cry when they are hungry, and turn their head away when they are full. Over time, this regulating eating behavior can get lost, and it’s not exactly easy to find it again. Listening to and understanding cues the body gives us about eating takes practice, but it’s worth it. Renee McGregor is a performance and eating specialist dietician. She has spent over 15 years working with elite athletes, coaches, teams, and others to enhance athletic performance and manage eating disorders. She is at the forefront of researching and providing solutions on orthorexia. Pace > Weight For runners especially, weight can feel like the difference between winning and losing. In today’s episode of the Running for Real podcast, Renee helps to debunk the myth about losing weight to run faster. It is common to think that losing five pounds will make you run faster. Mathematically it makes sense, less weight to carry means less work, leaving more energy to run longer and faster. But the body is best when it comes to deciding how much weight to keep. Renee says that the best indicator of how fast you’ll be able to run is the pace you hit in training. Pace, not weight, is what runners should be focused on. If you are able to hit your pace, then the body will decide how much weight it should keep in order to maintain that pace. Especially in the long run, allowing the body to be the weight it wants to be will allow you to consistently hit the times you are reaching for. Body knows best.  Your Example Matters The way you talk to yourself about your body matters. It matters to young athletes around you, and it matters to your own emotional health. Orthorexia and other eating disorders can only be combatted as the norms and societal thinking patterns change. It starts with you.  Be aware of how you are talking about yourself in front of others and how you are talking to yourself in your head. “We all have intrusive thoughts on a daily basis that make us uncomfortable,” says Renee, “For every intrusive thought, can we find a best friend thought, thoughts that have your best interest at heart?” So, be positive. Talk to yourself as if you were encouraging a best friend. Better your relationship with food. Don’t feel guilty for having fun. Listen to your body, give it what it needs. As you do these things, your body will take care of you and you will find a love for who you are, regardless of what life throws at you. Resources: (Book) Orthorexia Renee’s Twitter Renee’s Website Renee’s Instagram Train Brave Alan Flanagan’s Instagram   Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | The wonderful sponsor for this episode is ME about my new book. My new book is out in the world! You can purchase a copy of Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends, I couldn’t of done any of this without you all!! Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Renee, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Steve Magness: How to Improve Your Run By Feel, Not Time-R4R 098
Running Without a Watch Running has been an individual sport since the Ancient Greek Olympics. There are no excuses when you run a race poorly, and no teammates to blame. Even in the few running events that are team related, you have complete control over how you perform. For many runners, this is an aspect of the sport that they love. You can train and compete on your own. The only person you need to worry about beating, is yourself. You are in command, and in the end, it’s just you against your previous best time. All you need is a pair of shoes and a watch to continually improve on your sport. But what if someone told you that you are doing it all wrong? Would you still run if you were told you could never use a watch again? What if you never knew your best 5K, 10K, or marathon time? How would running change for you? Effort-Based Running Steve Magness, whose friends and colleagues sometimes refer to as “the science guy,” has a love for numbers and stats. In some ways, numbers have defined who he is. Steve was first well known for running a 4:01 mile in high school. If there was any teenager who deserved to be obsessed with a watch, it was Steve.  Magness went on to run on a collegiate level, and shortly after he began his coaching career. He is now a coach for a handful of elite runners as well as the head coach for the University of Houston cross country team. Houston is known for its heat and humidity which can completely dictate the pace of a run. Steve quickly realized that conducting workouts focused on time alone can be dangerous. It is impossible to base training sessions and race times off the face of a clock when the weather is in control.  So, how can you race against yourself if you can’t count on a watch?  Steve has learned over the years to pull back the reigns on his left side brain of statistics and fact, and let feeling dictate the pace of his athlete’s runs. “As you deal with people you realize that they are people, not robots,” says Steve, “It’s incredibly important to remember the human component of it. Running by feel requires a different skillset than saying, ‘go run a 5:00 pace.’” Coach Magness’s athletes learn how to do things like run at a 6:00 per mile effort. This is very useful when race day comes around and the weather looks scary. Instead of mindlessly trying to hit certain splits, Steve’s athletes can run at certain efforts based on how they feel. Whether the weather is humid, freezing, or windy, they know what it feels like to run at a pace that should allow them to do their very best. Running Smarter vs. Runner Harder “We’ve lost the notion of smart work at the expense of hard work which somehow almost always gets confused with more work.”  When you tap into your feelings as you run, you have a chance to truly run your best. The only way to run smart, instead of just hard, is to understand your emotional and physical self completely. Taking time away from your watch is one way to stay in touch with how you feel. Another way is to take a break from running completely. “Our culture is one where success and performance has been mistaken for ‘do more work,’ and that’s not reality,” says Steve, “Performance and success aren’t dependent on how much work we do, it’s how much better we get. And sometimes that means having the courage to step back and take rests.” Taking a break from using a watch, or from running in general, is less about letting our bodies rest and more about letting our minds rest. We need emotional restorative periods that allow full recovery. Overuse of our mental muscles is just as real as overuse of our physical muscles.  Start Small If you are addicted to your watch, Steve recommends taking baby steps in moving away from it. Especially for recreational runners, it is important that running stays a form of release rather than another daily stress. Try doing one workout without your apple watch, or do one 400 without looking down at the half-way point. Slowly, you will learn to run by feel and effort. As you do, you will be confident that you have done your best, no matter what the clock says. Resources: The Science of Running (Book) Peak Performance (Book) The Passion Paradox (Book, Preorder) Steve’s Website Steve’s Twitter Adam Grant’s Twitter Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | The wonderful sponsor for this episode is ME about my new book. Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back.  It’s coming out on January 21, 2019, THREE DAYS but also is available for pre-order NOW. I can remind you when it is available if you sign up here Running4Real Newsletter. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends!! Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Steve, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Alex Hutchinson: How to Build Up Your Running Mindset R4R 097
Running with an Elite Mindset There has been a lot of talk about breaking the 2-hour marathon over the past year. In 2018 Eliud Kipchoge finished with a time of 2:01:39 at the Berlin Marathon, beating the previous record by over 40 seconds. Many believe that the sub 2-hour marathon will happen in the next five to ten years when just a few years ago scientists were saying that it was impossible for a human to complete such a feat. Completing such an impossible task takes more than just a perfectly fit physical body and optimal running conditions. To break this type of barrier, the mind has to be just as fit as the body. “Your brain has all sorts of very clever and hardwired ways of trying to convince you to stop things that are hard,” says Alex Hutchinson. If there’s one thing that I am certain is hard, it’s running a marathon in under two hours. Alex Hutchinson, Ph.D., is an author and journalist who focuses much of his energies on human endurance research. He is also a former middle- and long-distance runner on the Canadian national team. In today’s episode of the Running for Real podcast, Alex adeptly articulates his thoughts on the impact of running with an elite mindset, and what that means today. This is not one you want to miss. Fads vs Facts Controversy and excitement always surround new inventions and discoveries that help to break world records. It can be difficult to distinguish between what is new and true and what is simply a coincidence (think of any short-lived diet fad). Sometimes it’s less about what works, and more about whether it is fair (like any number of banned drugs). Two interesting and seemingly unrelated ideas that may have an impact on the sub 2-hour marathon are shoes and smiles. The Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4% was the first shoe to cross the finish line in the 2018 Berlin Marathon. This shoe has now been worn by about half of the top 3 runners in each of the major marathons recently. The Nike Zoom Vaporfly is light, well-cushioned, and has a thin carbon fiber plate that supposedly gives a spring-like push to propel the runner forward. Purists argue that this shoe changes the run enough that it is no longer fair to compare those that have run without them, to those that have run with them. The shoes have yet to be banned, but don’t be surprised if broken records aren’t taken as seriously by those that run with them. In a recent experiment, scientists discovered that runners who smiled during a run compared to those that frowned, experienced a running economy that was 2% better. Smiling, whether naturally or deliberately, has been found to increase productivity, healing-rate, and a number of other things over the years. But is smiling always a positive thing? For Alex Hutchinson it’s about the situation. While training Alex realized that when he smiled, he felt surprisingly better. He finished a set with more energy, but his pace also slowed. Obviously, running slower makes you feel better.  However, when Alex is running paced splits, he does the best he can to relax his face. When you know your pace won’t change, then smiling can reap the benefits. But if an intense face is what gets you running fast, then put on your best snarl. In general, it is better to mix things up occasionally. Do Your Workout, Not the “Best” Workout Another common pitfall when training is to compare your training program to your competitors’. You know your body better than anyone, and doing your workout can be much more effective than doing someone else’s. Alex gives an example of changing his training to match one of his friends. Both Alex and his friend would beat each other in races about the same number of times, but Alex’s friend had a training program that was much more grueling. When Alex tried to complete a similar training session, he felt defeated, not able to even finish the workout. But he remembered that he could compete in the actual race with his own workout. An important part of an elitist mindset is faith in your way. If you believe in your stride, your training, and your body, you can spend less time comparing yourself and more time winning. A Progressive Mindset A great mindset to have when running a long-distance race is a progressive one. Start off the race with less intense, more relaxed thoughts, and as you near the finish line, have thoughts that give you the grit you need to dig deep. Sport psychologists recommend having planned thoughts during certain parts of a race. For example, plan on thinking about your dream home during mile 5-8, think about your form during mile 12-14, and think about that bully from middle school during mile 22-23. It’s just as important to exercise your mind as it is your body. Smile and snarl with purpose. Visualize and meditate. Practice having different thoughts during your workouts and see what works best for you. As you practice, you will find a mindset that helps you become the runner you want to be.  Resources: (Book) Endure Alex’s Twitter Alex’s Website Trent Stellingwerff’s Twitter   Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | The wonderful sponsors for this episode is ME about my new book and Inside Tracker. Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back.  It’s coming out on January 21, 2019 and available for pre-order NOW. I can remind you when it is available if you sign up here Running4Real Newsletter. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends!!   Sometimes our bodies act in weird ways that don’t quite make sense. Often our bodies show that stress when we have blood work, but the results from the doctors can be confusing. I love using Inside Tracker to get my test, get the results assessed for me, and get the recommendations of what I can eat and do to improve my health. I recommend Inside Tracker High Performance Test Use coupon code TINA for 20% off. Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Alex, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Tom Michaud: How to Care For Your Ever Changing and Connected Body- R4R 096
Prevention and Healing for Runners as they Age As you age, many things about your body change. Whether you are just leaving your teen years or planning your 100th birthday party, your body is adapting to new circumstances. Keeping it healthy so that you can continue to run as long as you live is a valiant effort. Along the way, there will be years of healing, growing, and learning. Optimally, correct exercise will help prevent the need for long periods of recovery or invasive surgeries.  Dr. Tom Michaud has been studying the human body for several decades now. He works as a sports medicine chiropractor, an author, and a researcher. He also creates products for healthcare professionals that help in client examinations. His goal is to provide non-surgical management of injuries, and he specializes in exercise recovery. As you listen to today’s episode of the Running for Real podcast, you will quickly discover that Tom is an expert in his field who has a desire to help and heal others. The Connected Body Injuries aren’t simple. There is a reason why WebMD is both expansive and inconclusive. Every injury is unique to the person and the situation. One of the biggest reasons injuries can be difficult to decipher is because the body is completely connected. This is also a great reason to visit with doctors or chiropractors, like Dr. Michaud, who have an extensive knowledge of the body as a whole. Meeting with these professionals will help you find the root of the problem, allowing for more relief in the long run.  It is important to get a full recovery to prevent more injuries in the future. “The best predictor of future injury is prior injury,” says Dr. Michaud, “So rehabilitating a prior injury perfectly is important.” Take the time to fully recover from injuries and workouts. As you strengthen all the areas of your body, you will be less susceptible to future injuries. Hips, Calves and Diaphragm While there isn’t one exercise that fixes all injuries, there are definitely some general areas of the body that coordinate with a large majority of running-related issues. Dr. Michaud mentions three areas of the body that when trained properly, can decrease the odds of injury significantly. Keeping your hips and calves strong and flexible and doing diaphragm exercises all help in injury prevention. Many common knee-related and lower leg injuries stem from the hips. Injuries most often occur when bad form or poor posture meet fatigue. This is why many injuries occur near the end of a race, a workout or a game. Hip strength and mobility are crucial for maintaining good form when you run. Elite marathon runners who have long, fast strides often have strong and flexible hips that allow them to reduce the braking force that is associated with long strides. Without strong and flexible hips, they wouldn’t be able to keep running at such fast paces without frequent injuries. Calves are one of the first muscle groups in the body to lose muscle mass as you age. Active and flexible calves are necessary to avoid decreased balance with age. Plantar fasciitis can also be reduced or prevented with proper stretching and strengthening of the calves. Diaphragm breathing exercises are beginning to get more attention as researchers are studying their benefits. The layman’s explanation for the benefits of a strong diaphragm is straightforward: As the diaphragm fatigues, blood flow decreases to other areas of the body and with decreased blood flow, those areas are more prone to injury. When asked about what core exercises runners should do, Dr. Michaud suggests diaphragm exercises over any variation of traditional core exercises like sit-ups.  Ongoing Research New methods of injury prevention will continue to transform as researchers perform new tests. It is important to remember that science isn’t perfect. Be patient with your body and your doctor. Read and listen to new articles on health, and don’t be afraid to ask your trainers, doctors, and mentors hard questions.  Most of all, have a positive attitude toward your body. No matter its condition, it is alive and allowing you to do wonderful things. Treat it well, to the best of your knowledge, and it will continue to serve you. Resources: (Book) Injury-Free Running (Book) Human Locomotion Tom’s Website Tom’s Products Tom’s Article New Article: How to Reduce Injury Power Diaphram Breather Strong Stars Breathing Video Researcher: Tony Kay Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | The wonderful sponsor for this episode is ME and about my new book, Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back.  It’s coming out on January 21, 2019 and available for pre-order NOW. If you are planning on purchasing a digital copy, it would mean a lot if you could go ahead and pre-order now, and then leave me a review on amazon the week the book comes out. I can remind you when it is available if you sign up here Running4Real Newsletter. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends!! Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Tom, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Melody Moore: Better Yourself For a Better 2019- R4R 095
Kick Start Your Year with a Whole Lot of Self Love Welcome to 2019! Congratulations on making it to another year. Take a moment to celebrate yourself and simply be grateful for the opportunity to live another year.  Really, take a moment. Now, as you settle in, contemplate what you want this year to look like. What new goals do you have for yourself? Are they the same goals you’ve always had? Are they goals that you really believe in–or are they simply goals that you think other people will approve of or admire? Do you have a plan for your goals? Are they measurable?  There are a million and one things to think about when setting goals for yourself and planning a new year. Sometimes the best thing you can do for yourself is to slow down. In a world that is non-stop, always asking for more attention, always asking you to do more, this article is about slowing down, doing less, and being in the moment. Consider implementing some of these suggestions into your life this new year.  Be Present In this week’s episode of the Running for Real podcast, we interviewed Melody Moore. Dr. Melody Moore, Ph.D., is a psychologist, yogi, and founder of the Embody Love Movement. She coaches individuals to believe in themselves, to love themselves and to know that they are enough. One of Melody’s most highly suggested invitations is to “be present.” But what does it mean to be present? “[Being present] means being fully awake to the experience,” says Melody, “not stuck in the past, not worried about the future, but right here and right now in this very experience.” The present is the only thing that is real. The only thing that is actually real to you is the experience you are having reading this very sentence. Less is More When we live in the moment, we only focus on one thing at a time. It means we don’t allow ourselves to think about the disappointments of the past or the fears of the future. We only tune in to the experience of now. This can take work and isn’t easy to master immediately. We are distracted by ads, children, friends, cell phones, and our own thoughts. Multitasking is often encouraged, and it can feel like it is impossible to get everything done without doing two, three, or four things at once.  “What happens when we become present is we feel less need to ‘fill in’ and get busy,” says Melody, “When we slow down and do one thing at a time, we end up doing it really well.” She argues that in nearly every case, doing two things at once that takes you 10 minutes, can be done in two 5-minute chunks. And when you can focus on one thing at a time, you do it better and can fully experience it. Doing one thing at a time allows us to fully enjoy it. It is sustainable. Instead of being concerned about a future race, or the potential rush that you may get as you cross a finish line, breathe in the current moment. Think, “Why did I start running in the first place?” With every step of your training, focus on the moment. Your mind will be more at ease as you do so. Love Yourself So Others Can Love Themselves There are two excuses when it comes to vocalizing your strengths. The first is that you maybe, quite seriously, don’t think you are good enough or think your performance is plain lousy. The second excuse is that you don’t want to come off as arrogant. Both of these excuses are just that, excuses. When you show others that you are proud of your accomplishments, it helps to dissipate the illusion that it is not good to celebrate ourselves. If you are an elite runner, but (albeit out of fear of bragging) are unable to talk about yourself as one, think about what example that sets for the millions of average runners. When you vocalize your love for yourself, and your accomplishments, you allow others to do the same. And when someone else does well, give them all the praise you can. Sharing the love and being truly genuine about your support will help you feel more comfortable in loving yourself. On the other end of the spectrum, if you just barely finished your first 5k and it took you an hour, think of how many doors you open for people if you celebrate that victory. Every victory is a victory. Be proud of who you are and what you have done. You never know who might be watching. Make this your year. Love yourself, every bit of you. Be present. You may be surprised by the joy you find in the everyday moments. Resources: Melody’s Website Embody Love Movement CTZN Well (Kerri Kelly) Lauren Fleshman’s Twitter Jean Kilbourne Films  World Muse Book: Mindful Running Book: The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple (iTunes) Podcast | Sticher | Castbox | Overcast | Spotify | Google Play | iHeartradio | The wonderful sponsor for this episode is ME and about my new book, Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back.  It’s coming out on January 21, 2019 and available for pre-order on January 1, 2019. I can remind you when it is available if you sign up here Running4Real Newsletter. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends!! Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Melody, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Best Running For Real Podcast Episodes of 2018- R4R 094
2018 is coming to an end in just a few days, and whether you are a new listener or a long time listener, this episode will have something for you. I recap some of my favorite episodes of the year, and why they had such good advice for runners of every level. This runner podcast episode contains clips from each of the best episodes, so you can hear for yourself the best part of each episode. If you are a new podcast listener who is unsure where to start, these episodes are a good place to start. Resources Tina’s Instagram Tina’s Facebook Running For Real Superstars Community Tina’s Twitter Kim Jones- Episode 48 Andy Jones- Episode 49 Kara Goucher- Episode 50 Dave Collins- Episode 52 Alex Hutchinson- Episode 54 Allie Kieffer- Episode 56 Trent Stellingwerff- Episode 57 Chau Smith – Episode 62 Jason Fitzgerald- Episode 67 Emily Kraus- Episode 70 Jared Ward- Episode 72 Chrissie Wellington- Episode 74 Matt Davis- Episode 79 Dean Karnazes- Episode 81 Sarah Crouch- Episode 86 Siri Lindley- Episode 90 Guy Winch- Episode 92 Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple Podcasts (iTunes), Stitcher, Castbox, Overcast, Spotify, Google Play and now iHeartRadio   Thank you to Bodyhealth and Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back for sponsoring this episode of Running for Real. Now I am back to training, guess what was the first thing I did to start making sure I recover quicker (as coming back to fitness really beats your body up!), yep, you guessed it, BodyHealth Perfect Amino! Get 10% off at Bodyhealth.com using coupon code TINA10 Click the banner for more information.   My second sponsor is ME! My book, Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. It’s coming out on January 21, 2019 and available for pre-order on January 1, 2019. I can remind you when it is available if you sign up here Running4Real Newsletter. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends!! Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
Steph Bruce: Building Grit in Your Running and Life-R4R 093
To All the Mothers that Run Choosing to be a mother is one of the most selfless acts a person can do. From the moment a child begins to grow in the womb, a mother completely changes. The miracle that occurs as your body changes to support another human being is both wonderful and overwhelming. Pain, joy, tears, and smiles. It’s a physical and emotional rollercoaster. Mothers who are runners must make many decisions about their children and their running routines. Can I run while I’m pregnant? When can I start running again after my child is born? Is it okay for me to leave my child at the day care while I run? When can I take my kids running with me? Stephanie Bruce, one of today’s elite female runners, is also a mother of two. She has experienced a professional running career both before and after childbirth. On today’s episode of the Running for Real podcast, she shared her thoughts on balancing a running career with motherhood. Listen or read along to learn more about what it means to be a runner and a mother. Mom Guilt Especially during the first few months of your newborn’s life, you are likely to experience “Mom Guilt.” Mom guilt is the feeling you get anytime you step away from your baby to do something that may seem selfish. Whether it’s getting a pedicure, or having an extended workout session, mom guilt is lurking close by. “Doing the things that might appear selfish on paper are so important for you to be a better mom and a better wife,” says Steph. Each month she gets together with a group of friends to have a “Bad Moms’ Night Out” just to have time to check in with people and talk about motherhood.  It’s important to remember that when you take care of yourself and your needs, you perform better as a mother. And that doesn’t just mean physically. Taking care of your social and emotional needs are just as important. When you spend time on yourself, the time you spend with your children will be more intentional and loving. An Acceptable Recovery Period The most important thought you can have as a newborn mother is that your situation is unique. It’s important to avoid comparing yourself to other runners that aren’t mothers, and it’s equally important not to compare yourself to other mothers. That being said, here are a few things you can expect as you begin to run after giving birth. 6 Weeks Postpartum. You just had your baby, but you may start to feel anxious about getting back out there to run. A good thing to remember at this phase is that you have a lifetime to recover and get back into running, but your baby will only be this old for a short period of time. Try not to miss those beautiful moments. 3-4 Months Postpartum. It’s been a somewhat significant amount of time now. You have probably started running again. Even though you feel like you may be able to get back into a routine at this point, it can be a very difficult period. Babies often have sleep regressions at this time. Avoid dwelling on long-term goals and just focus on one thing at a time. Make one good meal for yourself. Get in one good nap. Have one good run. Baby steps. 6 Months Postpartum. This is a crucial time for you. Your baby can spend longer periods of time on its own or with others. Avoid the comparison trap! You may be able to start training as frequently as you were before your baby, but that doesn’t mean you are the same person. 1 Year Postpartum. A full year. This is a good time for you to reflect on your goals and aspirations while you fully take in what the last year has been for you. Do you still have the same goals? What’s important to you at this stage of your life? If you have the same goals, what are you now willing to sacrifice to accomplish them? Even after a year, your body may not feel the same as before. Be patient. Dig deep. You can find the grit you need to be what you want. Finding Grit Being a mother and a runner takes serious grit. There needs to be something that powers you, something that lets you accomplish the daily tasks and pushes you to go even further. Grit is that something. “The whole idea of grit [is that] we can all find our own grit in our lives,” says Stephanie, “Maybe it’s running, maybe it’s a death in the family, maybe it’s getting through a divorce, or getting through depression. Whatever it is, if we can have a word or a meaning to take hold of, I think it can help us get through the very dark times in our lives.” As you balance your life between motherhood, running, and whatever else it is that you do, look for something that can be your personal grit. Take a hold of it and repeat it to yourself whenever times get tough. You CAN make it through all the tough miles in life. Resources: Steph’s Instagram Steph’s Facebook Steph’s Twitter Steph’s Website Book: Grit Listen to the Running for Real Podcast here: Apple Podcasts (iTunes), Stitcher, Castbox, Overcast, Spotify, Google Play and now iHeartRadio Thank you to  Bodyhealth and my book, Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back for sponsoring this episode of Running for Real. Now I am back to training, guess what was the first thing I did to start making sure I recover quicker (as coming back to fitness really beats your body up!), yep, you guessed it, BodyHealth Perfect Amino! Get 10% off at Bodyhealth.com using coupon code TINA10 Click the banner for more information. My second sponsor is ME! My book, Overcoming Amenorrhea: Get Your Period Back. Get Your Life Back. It’s coming out on January 21st 2019 and available for pre-order on January 1st 2019. I can remind you when it is available if you sign up here Running4Real Newsletter. Thank you SO much for all of the support my friends!! Thanks for Listening! I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Join the Running for Real Facebook Group and share your thoughts on the episode (or future guests you would like to hear from) Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews will really help me climb up the iTunes rankings and I promise, I read every single one. Subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe, you can find out here. Thank you to Steph, I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.
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Comments (3)

Lorenzo Trujillo

This has become one of my favorite podcasts! It's a no BS, easy to listen to, and informative podcast that is just down right pleasant! I feel like I'm friends with Tina and her guests.

Nov 15th
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Mike Pisani

Turned it off when it became an advertisement for Hoka Cliftons. "Or you can wear them to the coffee shop..." Ugh.

Aug 10th
Reply

Nancy Calvo

Crossfit

Aug 6th
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