DiscoverThe Secrets of Mathematics
The Secrets of Mathematics
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The Secrets of Mathematics

Author: Oxford University

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A series of talks and lectures from Oxford Mathematicians exploring the power and beauty of their subject. These talks would appeal to anyone interested in mathematics and its ever-growing range of applications from medicine to economics and beyond.
66 Episodes
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Our Open Days are intended to give an insight in to Maths at Oxford, whether you are a potential applicant or are just curious. In this talk about the Applied Maths that our undergraduates study at Oxford, Dominic Vella uses everyday examples to explain that Applied Mathematics is about looking afresh at the world around you, looking at scientific problems and using mathematical models to solve them.
In this talk Vicky Neale gives a glimpse of the undergraduate Pure Maths courses through the lens of elliptic curves. Our Open Days are intended to give an insight in to Maths at Oxford, whether you are a potential applicant or are just curious.
In this talk, Admissions Guru James Munro explains how we teach, how you can apply and what your Oxford mathematical life might be like. Our Open Days are intended to give an insight in to Maths at Oxford, whether you are a potential applicant or are just curious.
In this Public Lecture, which contains more technical content than our norm, John Bush presents seemingly disparate topics which are in fact united by a common theme and underlaid by a common mathematical framework. First there is the natural world where creatures use surface tension to support themselves on the water surface and propel themselves along it. Then there is a small droplet bouncing alongthe surface of a vibrating liquid bath, guided or 'piloted’ by its own wave field - its ability to reproduce many features previously thought to be exclusive to quantum systems has launched the field of hydrodynamic quantum analogs, and motivated a criticalrevisitation of the philosophical foundations of quantum mechanics.John Bush is a Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Mathematics at MIT specialising in fluid dynamics. The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
In this fascinating and provocative lecture, Marcus du Sautoy both tests our ability to distinguish between human and machine creativity, and suggests that our creativity may even benefit from that of the machines. The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
An old-fashioned tale of tale of romance and estrangement, of hope and despair. Graham Farmelo's Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture charts the 350 year relationship between Mathematics and Physics and its prospects for the future. Might things be less dramatic in future? Might they just have to be 'going steady' for a while?Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
The third in our popular series of filmed student lectures takes us to Integration. This is the opening lecture in the 1st Year course. Ben Green both links the course to the mathematics our students have already learnt at school and develops that knowledge, taking the students to the next stage. Like all good lectures it recaps and points forward.
Knots are a familiar part of everyday life, for example tying your tie or doing up your shoe laces. They play a role in numerous physical and biological phenomena, such as the untangling of DNA when it replicates. However, knot theory is also a well-developed branch of pure mathematics. In his talk, Marc gives an introduction to this theory and places it in the context of the modern field of topology. This is the branch of mathematics where you are allowed to stretch and deform objects, but not tear them. He explains how topological techniques can be used to prove some surprising facts about knots. He also gives some problems about knots that mathematicians haven't yet been able to solve.Marc Lackenby is a Professor of Mathematics in Oxford and a Fellow of St Catherine's College.The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.
The Oxford Mathematics educational experience is a journey, a journey like any other educational experience. It builds on what you learn at school. It is not unfamiliar and we don't want it too invisible. But it has aspects that are different.One of these is the tutorial system. Students have lectures. But they also have tutorials based on those lectures where they sit, usually in pairs, with a tutor, go through their work and, critically, get to ask questions. It is their tutorial.Having streamed the Dynamics lecture (also on this site), we now present the tutorial as it happened.
For the first time ever, Oxford Mathematics has live streamed a student lecture. It took 800 years but now you can see what it is really like. We hope you find it familiar and intriguing and challenging. James Sparks is Professor of Mathematical Physics and Director of Graduate Studies (Research).
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