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The Stoop

Author: Hana Baba and Leila Day

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The Stoop podcast digs into stories that are not always shared out in the open. Hosts Leila Day and Hana Baba start conversations and provide professionally-reported stories about what it means to be black and how we talk about blackness. Come hang out on The Stoop as we dialog about the diaspora.
42 Episodes
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Ep 39: For Ima

Ep 39: For Ima

2020-06-1133:451

We're at that moment — again. Another black person gone, and another, and another. It hurts. Everyone seems to be watching, and everyone seems to have questions.    But this isn't new, and we're not here for everyone. We're here for 14-year-old Ima. 
Ep 38: That Black Tax

Ep 38: That Black Tax

2020-05-2132:52

For many of us, success and 'making it' also means you're expected to help out and support your family. Whether you're Black American, or a child of Black immigrants- that 'Black Tax' is often something you're going to be thinking about. Today we get personal with a story from Mwende Hinojosa who explains how What's App brings her Kenyan family together but it can also be very...taxing.  
We're getting into the myths surrounding the coronavirus and discussing how Covid-19 could have a different impact on black people. We also hear from workers in the service industry who share their stories about how they are pushing through. Let’s stoop it out together.
Ep 35: Je suis noir

Ep 35: Je suis noir

2020-02-0725:42

In this episode we meet Deborah from Brooklyn, who’s about to pack her bags and move to  Paris. It's a place she’s always adored, along with the likes of other famous African Americans; Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Josephine Baker to name of few. Many black Americans have moved there for a particular reason, many were exhausted by the racial dynamics and conversations in the U.S. , just like Deborah,  who feels these are conversations that go in circles. France has prided itself on its citizens being “French” before identifying with an ethnicity and this is something that appealed to Deborah who’s chosen not to “lead with her blackness”. In this episode we go to France to talk about how black people are identifying and discuss some of the tensions behind a word like “noir” that can be seen as an insult for some and pure pride for others.
Should we support Black no matter what? We discuss the pressure to conform with liking all things Black, even when you don’t. Whether it’s Black art, the Black politician, or a hashtag. The feeling that we have to always align is tied to a psychological concept called 'social desirability bias.' We’ll break down why we do it with a Black psychologist from Stanford, hear from a culture critic who says we shouldn’t succumb to it, and hosts Hana and Leila question their own motives.
EP. 32: In Deep Waters

EP. 32: In Deep Waters

2019-12-0428:46

Season 4 is here! In this episode we're talking about Black folk and water. Yes, swimming.  We hear from a man who nearly lost his life while on vacation, and take a deeper look into our relationship to swimming. There are a lot  of jokes and myths within our community about why we don’t swim more, but what isn't funny is that nearly 70% of African American kids don't know how to swim. Today, we break down stereotypes that we've even heard our own family members reinforce.  Editor: Jen Chien Sound Designer: Seth Samuel Associate Producer: Natalie Peart          
It's our season finale and we're getting into issues of the fam; the things that our families say and do that have helped us or hurt us. We get into what it's like to gain a family unexpectedly and hear from a family whose cultural differences and jealousy nearly divided them. In this special episode we also stoop it with author, therapist, Netflix’ Fab 5 member, and unexpected father Karamo Brown. Keep it in the fam. We'll be back with a brand new season soon! 
Ep. 30: Black Enough

Ep. 30: Black Enough

2019-06-0524:04

Whether it's the music we hear, the clothes we wear, or the way we talk- a lot of us at some point have felt 'not Black enough.' In this episode, we go deep with comedian W. Kamau Bell who's felt awkward in Black circles and before Black audiences, and we'll meet Black Benatar- a drag queen who has struggled and come to terms with performing Blackness.
What’s a sound that embodies blackness? In this episode we ask around and then get deeper into conversation with Glory Edim, the founder of Well Read Black Girl, a Brooklyn based book club and online community. What’s it mean to be well read? This special Stoop episode was recorded live at WNYC's The GreenSpace, and goes deeper into conversations about what it means to return to Africa, how to create inclusive community, and really, how black are we?
Being Muslim, black and a woman; that’s something that deserves some stoopin’ out. Anti-blackness in Muslim America is real, and in this episode we look at how it often seems to fall on BMW’s (Black Muslim Women). What happens when the shade or discrimination comes from your own people?  
Episode 26: Mad Hotep

Episode 26: Mad Hotep

2019-03-2725:32

Sometimes conversations stop when you walk into a barbershop, but sometimes they keep going no matter how uncomfortable you may feel. In this episode we unpack what it means to be a hotep; from personal experiences, to the root of the word, to online tensions. We stoop it out with producer Josh Gwynn who shares his story of maneuvering through some hotep spaces, while on a simple mission, to look fly.
What can love look like when your partner might not ‘get it’? In this episode we talk to interracial couples having difficult conversations around race, love and identity at a time when racial tensions are high. We also hear from Professor Shantel Buggs author of the study ‘Dating in the Time of #BlackLivesMatter’, who interviewed dozens of women to see whether awareness of racial issues mattered when they were choosing a partner, asking how socially aware do  you expect your non-Black partner to be?    
Thin nose, high cheekbones, kinky hair, what you got in your blood? Your blood won’t lie, but does it determine your identity? We meet two women- Uzaz Shami, a Nubian woman who didn’t expect her results, and Shonda Buchanan who has always identified as Native American but isn’t always accepted as that.  What percent of an ethnicity makes you part of that group, and does it even matter?
The Stoop goes to the low country of South Carolina to uncover some of the hidden history of the Gullah Geechee. The mix of African cultures in the deep south eventually transformed into a unique language and culture that is Gullah. Lean in for this one. We outchea!  
Ep 36: Black on air

Ep 36: Black on air

2020-02-2832:02

The pen, the mic, the camera - all powerful tools that people in media have used to get our attention, but for Black women journalists, getting a hold of that power and keeping it, has been a tough path to navigate. From how we sound, to what we look like, to how we say thangs. We explore the profession with journalist Jemele Hill, and hear about the past from veteran journalist Belva Davis, while Hana and Leila get into some of their own experiences in the field.
We end this season by going deep into how we express ourselves at the intersection where spirituality meets artistic expression - and how that intersection can be complicated.  We meet Alia Sharrief- a Black Muslim woman hip hop artist who raps about her faith, Black girl magic, and social justice - despite the haters. And Leila takes us to an Afro-Cuban dance class to get in touch with the Orisha, and has some questions about others, that lead to questioning herself.   
Our babies and their hair. We hear how two parents discuss hair with their kids. Author Robert Trujillo wrote a book about his son, Furqan's, first flat top. Then we meet  Fatima Jones and he daughter Aponi, and listen in on an intimate conversation about hair, pride and love.  To find the book Furqan's First Flat Top, by Robert Liu-Trujillo. Illustration by Robert Liu-Trujillo
It's summertime and we're sharing some stories, portraits essays and things that you've been telling us you want to hear more of. In this episode we hear from Shelton Johnson, a park ranger at Yosemite National Park who reenacts the story of a Buffalo Soldier who used to patrol the park as a ranger. A complicated history that comes with both pride and shame.
We dig in to our food, our tradition. Does eating plant-based make you bougie? We talk to Afro- Vegan chef Bryant Terry who shows us what it means to be a dope Blegan (Black vegan). Then we get into the Jollof rice wars- who makes it better? Ghana, Nigeria? It's the world cup of Jollof!
Black homophobia is real- and we meet two influential people who are fighting it - each in their own inspiring way. Bishop Yvette Flunder, and author and activist Darnell Moore are Black, queer and free. This episode is delves into the language we use, the things that need to be said, and the celebration of black boy joy and intimacy. 
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Comments (4)

Sha'ron Smith

Great episode. I am often given this label at work........but am one of the main " go to people"! No matter what my demeanor is, this is the label. Go figure! By the way, I am in no way aggressive. Just direct.

Jan 11th
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Maurice Norrise Jr

wow! I wasn't the only one with surprise not knowing parenthood

Jul 5th
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Maurice Norrise Jr

This is so true, hair quietly represents so much. .. even all of family.

Jul 5th
Reply

matthew venn

thanks for this podcast! super interesting. lots of insights, looking forward to listening to the rest!

Apr 18th
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