DiscoverThe Suno India Show
The Suno India Show

The Suno India Show

Author: Suno India

Subscribed: 415Played: 6,923
Share

Description

The Suno India Show’ is a weekly news show by Suno India combining slow journalism with under-represented and under-reported stories. Covering the diverse range of topics like politics, technology, education and society, the host brings in informative interviews and engaging discussions with experts. The show not only shines a spotlight on stories that matter but keeps the listeners up to date with the latest national news.
170 Episodes
Reverse
Independent journalist Srishti Jaswal was trolled online for a comment on a movie last year. Jaswal and her colleague, Shreegireesh Jalihal then investigated the group – Hindu IT cell- that organised the online trolling and the legal action against her and many other people who they felt insulted Hindu gods and goddesses. A story about this investigation has been published on the news website, Newslaundry. Menaka Rao from Suno India Show interviewed these two journalists and found out how they conducted this investigation. We also have published the interviews with the members of the IT cell in this show. Also read: Newslaundry story on Hindu IT cell Srishti’s story Twitter handle of Hindu IT cell Sushmita Sinha’s Instagram story on Teej Hindu IT cell’s Twitter handle response to mobbing outside Advocate Deepika Rajawat’s house See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
There are more than 8,000 documented rare diseases in the world. An estimated 70-90 million Indians are said to be rare individuals. Most rare diseases are incurable, and where there are cures, the costs are prohibitive for patients and families. Rare diseases can also lead to disabilities. Yet why is that there is little public awareness of rare diseases? This #RareDiseaseDay2021, hear the stories of people who have been part of the 1 in 20,000 podcast series. Launched in 2019, the series offers a window into the lives of rare individuals, their search for proper medical diagnosis, treatment, and well-being. Rare Lives is the second season of the 1 in 20,000 podcast series. This series has sought to go beyond the stereotypes associated with rare individuals, who often end up being statistics in public conversation. For instance, it is said that the prevalence of a rare illness – FSHD – is 1 in 20,000 children. The series, however, dives into the perspectives, joys, challenges and motivations of rare individuals and their support systems. The upcoming session is a rare chance to see the human face behind the podcast episodes. They represent countless patients, families, caregivers, doctors, activists, and geneticists working to improve the life of every person who is living with a rare disease in India. For this episode of The Suno India show, Avantika Shrivastava spoke with Vipul Goyal, Shambhavi Ravishankar, Iftikhar Zia and Dr. Priyanshu Mathur. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On 12th January, the Haryana police arrested Nodeep Kaur, a Dalit labour activist while she was protesting against the non-payment of wages at Kundali industrial area (KIA) at Sonipat, Haryana. Kaur is from Punjab and the leader of Mazdoor Adhikar Sangathan, who is supporting ongoing farmer’s protests at the Haryana and UP border. US Vice President's niece Meena Harris tweeted her picture asking her to release brought her to notice. Farmer’s uprising circling National Capital got momentum and support across the globe, which asked the Central government to repeal three farms laws, which was passed through ordinance last year. United farmers organizations had 11 rounds of talks with the government and submitted 8 point charter. That demand includes the law on Minimum Support Price or MSP and repeals those three laws, which are related to open market trading, contractual farming, and excluding many products from the essential commodity list. The one issue, which is still missing from the farmer’s protest and on their agenda is Landless farmers or farm laborers issues. The 2011 census data shows that 71% of Dalits are landless laborers. In rural areas, 58.4% of Dalit households do not own land at all. Landless farmers belong to Dalit and Backward community with depressed wages and vulnerable to caste atrocity on daily basis. The host of this episode of The Suno India Show, Prashant Kanojia spoke to Nodeep Kaur’s sister, Rajvir Kaur and her mother, Swarnjit Kaur. We also spoke to farmer leaders and protestors from the protest site and a journalist from Bihar. While explaining how the farm laws would affect landless farmers, they also highlighted the issues related to landless farmers and labourers, which has been undermined and is not on the agenda of the ongoing protest. They explain how these farmers are not recognized as farmers and how they could widen the protest across India.  See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On February 5, Jammu & Kashmir government spokesperson Rohit Kansal tweeted that  4G mobile internet services have been restored in the entire Jammu and Kashmir area. The high-speed internet service was snapped by the government in August 2019 after the BJP led central government revoked Article 370 & downgraded the erstwhile state into two union territories. The low-speed or 2G Internet service on mobile phones was restored on January 25th, 2020. The host of this episode of The Suno India Show, Irfan Amin Malik spoke to YouTubers, employees, students, journalists and others from different areas of Kashmir valley, who said that the high-speed internet that they recall has not been restored yet.  The people also recalled how  their daily life was hit back during the world’s longest internet shutdowns. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The arrest of 22-year-old climate activist Disha Ravi has raised a number of questions. She has been charged with conspiracy and sedition for editing a google document, a toolkit supporting the farmers’ protests. The Delhi Police arrested Ravi from Bengaluru without a transit remand order. The police did not inform her chosen lawyers of her remand hearing and provided her with a legal aid lawyer instead. Then the magistrate ordered five days of police custody.  On this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Colin Gonsalves, a Senior Advocate of the Supreme Court and the founder of Human Rights Law Network. Gonsalves says that even people protesting peacefully and legally can be arrested by the police illegally. However, he gives legal advice on how those arrested can speak up for their rights before the police and the court. Legal precedents and guidelines cited by him are linked below.  DK Basu guidelines Arnesh Kumar vs State Of Bihar MHA advisory on arresting an accused outside State/UT jurisdiction  See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Recently several states including Uttar Pradesh introduced anti-conversion laws making religious conversion for the sake of marriage illegal. These laws were based on the conspiracy theory of ‘love jihad’ which posits that Muslim men marry Hindu women only to convert them to Islam. We bring a three-part series on how these laws have affected the lives of young people. With a growing narrative of ‘Love Jihad’ across India, we look at this phenomenon in West Bengal and its ties to Hindutva politics. Devdutta Maji is the founder of Singha Bahini, a Hindutva outfit that claims to ‘rescue’ Hindu women trapped by Muslim men across the state. He has also joined BJP and hopes to help the party win in the upcoming state polls. TMC MLA Rukbanur Rahman has personally experienced the opposition to interfaith marriages in the state. His brother Rizwanur Rahman had wed Priyanka Todi, the daughter of industrialist Ashok Todi, and died a month later. He says that not only is ‘Love Jihad’ a misnomer, the idea will not be accepted by the people of Bengal. In this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Rahman, Majhi and a minor girl who Majhi says he rescued. Also listen: How ‘love jihad’ laws clash with The Special Marriage Act How ‘love jihad’ affects women’s choice Important links: Living Reality of Muslims in West Bengal – Appeasement or Exclusion?  The Special Marriage Act, 1954 Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Recently several states including Uttar Pradesh introduced anti-conversion laws making religious conversion for the sake of marriage illegal. These laws were based on the conspiracy theory of ‘love jihad’ which posits that Muslim men marry Hindu women only to convert them to Islam. We bring a three-part series on how these laws have affected the lives of young people. The narrative of ‘love jihad’ that emerges from the Hindutva ideology imagines a woman to be innocent, ignorant people who cannot take their own decisions. In this formulation, the ideal woman is the one who follows the social norms and listens to her family. In this episode, we speak to three women who choose their own partners and tell us why they refused to obey social norms. Their choice is not just related to love, but also to their identity as independent women. Also listen How ‘love jihad’ laws clash with The Special Marriage Act Important links “Articulating Hindu Masculinity and Femininity-Shuddhi and Sangathan Movements in United Provinces in the 1920s” by historian Charu Gupta in the Economic and Political Weekly. The Special Marriage Act, 1954 UP Unlawful Religious Conversion Prohibition Ordinance, 2020 Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Recently several states including Uttar Pradesh introduced anti-conversion laws making religious conversion for the sake of marriage illegal. These laws were based on the conspiracy theory of ‘love jihad’ which posits that Muslim men marry Hindu women only to convert them to Islam. We bring a three-part series on how these laws have affected the lives of young people. In this episode, Menaka Rao spoke to a couple who had to run away from Uttar Pradesh after the introduction of its so-called ‘love jihad’ law- UP Unlawful Religious Conversion Prohibition Ordinance, 2020. The two wanted to marry under the Special Marriage Act, 1954 which allows for a civil marriage without conversion. But the two were still scared for their lives in Uttar Pradesh. They sought the help of Dhanak, an organisation that helps such interfaith couples.  We spoke to Asif Iqbal from Dhanak to understand how these new laws affect interfaith couples who want to marry against the wishes of their parents. We also spoke to one couple from Rajasthan and another married couple from Uttar Pradesh. Important links The Special Marriage Act, 1954 UP Unlawful Religious Conversion Prohibition Ordinance, 2020 Shakti Vahini vs Union of India which ordered every district in the country to have a safe house for run-away couples, among other safeguards Allahabad high court judgement that read down the Special Marriage Act, 1954 Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On 1st February 2021, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman presented the first ever paper-less and digital Union Budget for the fiscal year 2021-22. This is the first time the budget documents were paperless since Independence. All members of Parliament received soft copies of the Union Budget. We wanted to find out how Union Budgets have been presented so far. What were the financial priorities changed over the past 73 years? Suno India’s Research and Communications Officer, Kunika Balhotra spoke to Avani Kapur,  a Fellow at the Centre for Policy Research (CPR). She is also the Director of the Accountability Initiative (AI). The focus of her work has been in building evidence for policy advocacy to strengthen transparency and accountability in public financial management for service delivery.  Additional Reading Budget Document 2021 Accountability Initiative Budget Briefs Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The Union Budget 2021-2022 presented by the Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on 1st February 2021 proposed an outlay of Rs 2.23 lakh crore towards health and well-being. The Finance Minister claimed a 137 per cent increase over from last year.  However, the Right to Food Campaign activists who work with the poor who depend on these nutrition programmes and public health systems said that there have been cuts in the health and nutrition programmes this year despite the growing hunger situation in the country.  To understand more about the budgetary allocations, Kunika Balhotra, Research and Communications for Suno India spoke with Jean Dreze and Dr Vandana Prasad.  Dreze is a developmental economist and a visiting professor of Economics at Ranchi University. Dr Prasad is a community pediatrician and public health professional. She is the Joint Convenor of Jan Swasthya Abhiyan and a member of the Steering Committee of the Right to Food Campaign. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
It has been a year since the pandemic began. Sex workers across India are scrambling to get back on their feet. They are slowly resuming work with various safety measures, although income is nowhere near the same. On this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to sex workers across the Indian states of West Bengal, Jharkhand, Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra. They all echo the same statement: Sex work is work, and the state should protect all its workers equally.  They recall the months of unexpected lockdown that gutted their savings and even drove some to suicide. Few government policies were announced and those too required documents that sex workers do not have. Even after a Supreme Court verdict, implementation on the ground has been “too little too late”. They say they have always been persecuted, with red light areas shutting down across the country, pushing them into unsafe work environments. What is striking, however, is how communities of sex workers have supported each other. They found ways to help each other with basic necessities like food and medicines where state machineries failed.  Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
International charitable organisation Oxfam’s report ‘The Inequality Virus’ explores how inequality proved to be a bigger problem in this pandemic than the virus. Existing divisions in society were further widened with help from governments across the world, as the rich got richer and the poor poorer. Anjela Taneja, one of the lead authors of the report, understands that it’s a once-in-a-century crisis. She said that that the capacity of the state to deliver at this time is determined on whether it works in the interests of the vulnerable majority In this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks with Anjela Taneja about the ways in which the government failed, and all the ways in which it can succeed moving forward. The pandemic earnings of India’s billionaires alone prove that the country has enough resources to take care of its needy.  THE INEQUALITY VIRUS Davos India Supplement, 2021 Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Exactly a year ago, on January 30, 2020 the World Health Organisation declared that the Covid-19 outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern. We have all suffered a year of the pandemic now and it's time to look back and see what we have learned in hindsight. For this episode, Host Menaka Rao spoke to Dr Chandrakant Lahariya, a public health policy expert. He has co-authored the book Till We Win: India's Fight Against The COVID-19 pandemic, with Dr Randeep Guleria, the director of AIIMS, New Delhi and Dr Gagandeep Kang, professor of Microbiology at the Christian Medical College, Vellore which was released recently. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
In November last year, India’s female labour force participation rate fell to its lowest points at 6.9%. While 67% of all men of working age are employed, only 9% of all women of working age are employed in the country. The longer term trends suggest that female labour force participation rates in India have been puzzling. Women’s participation in the labor force is influenced and affected by many socio-economic factors such as how far they study, their age of marriage, urbanisation and others.  To understand more about the falling labour force participation of women in India, Kunika Balhotra, Suno India’s Research & Communication Officer reached out  to Sona Mitra, Principal Economist at Initiative for What Works to Advance Women and Girls in the Economy, an initiative of LEAD at Krea University. Additional Reading: Women’s Voices: Employment and Entrepreneurship In India Women’s labour force participation in India: Why is it so low? Why is female labour force participation declining so sharply in India? Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The farmers’ protest against the three new farm laws is not the first where protesters have refused to engage with what they consider pro-government media. Slogans like ‘Godi Media Go Back’ were also seen during the anti CAA protests last year. However, this is the first time that protesters have taken the matter into their own hands, printing their own news. Trolley Times is a bi-weekly newsletter for the protesters, by the protesters.  In this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks with activist duo Navkiran Natt and Ajay Pal Natt. These siblings are part of the team behind Trolley Times. They discuss how and why they took up the pen and gave a voice to the farmers’ protests. Printed in Hindi and Gurmukhi and distributed by hand, the newsletter is also translated into English for a global audience online.  Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Bharat Biotech’s Covaxin is one of the two Indian vaccines being administered to healthcare workers as India embarks on the world’s largest inoculation drive. Health experts have expressed concerns as hundreds of Bhopal Gas Tragedy survivors say they had been enrolled in the clinical trial for Covaxin without their informed consent. One of the trial participants, Deepak Marabi, passed away on December 21, 2020.  Join us on this episode of The Suno India Show, as our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee explores the alleged violation of the rights of this vulnerable group as well as the alleged misconduct of the clinical trial. These participants say they weren’t adequately monitored and their adverse reactions to the vaccine weren’t properly recorded.  She speaks to Rachna Dhingra, the activist with Bhopal Group of Information and Action who first tweeted about these ethical and legal violations. You will also hear from some of the trial participants, and Anant Bhan, who works in the field of bioethics and global health.  Vice Chancellor Dr Rajesh Kapur’s statement Bharat Biotech’s statement National Ethical Guidelines National Guidelines for Covid-19 Pandemic Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The Code on Wages, 2019 is likely to come into effect before April this year. The Code on Wages Act, 2019 aims to amend and consolidate laws relating to wages and bonus. It also aims to simplify and rationalise the subsumed four legislations; the Payment of Wages Act, 1936; the Minimum Wages Act, 1948; the Payment of Bonus Act, 1965; and the Equal Remuneration Act, 1976.  The government has promised minimum wages for all workers in the country with the new Code. The Code will also change the salary structures of those working in the formal sector. To understand the nuances of the new law, Kunika Balhotra, Research and Communications Officer for Suno India spoke with Rituparna Chakraborty, Co-Founder & Executive Vice President of TeamLease.  Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
With discussions around agitations related to the recent Farm laws, what is missing is context. Reforms in agriculture have a history since India’s independence starting with the Green revolution. This history is important to understand the present.  In this episode, Kunika Balhotra, Suno India’s Research and Communications Officer, spoke to Professor C.S.C. Sekhar to know more about the role of the agricultural sector in the Indian economy and the reforms that have transformed this sector since independence.  Our guest, C.S.C Sekhar is currently a Professor at the Institute of Economic Growth (IEG) and Honorary Director (former), Agricultural Economics Research Centre, University of Delhi, India. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
This is the second episode in the two-part series on developing COVID-19 vaccines for the Suno India show. In the first episode of the series, we discussed the different stages of clinical trials and how the vaccines were developed so fast.  In the second part, we are addressing key concerns about the cynicism around vaccine development. What are the legal processes involved in clearing the vaccines for mass vaccination in India? Were the vaccine trials fair and ethical? Is all the relevant information related to the vaccine development shared with the public?  For this episode, Menaka Rao spoke to Dr Amar Jesani, an expert bioethicist and teacher who has founded the prestigious journal, Indian Journal of Medical Ethics and advocate Murali Neelakantan, an expert in healthcare laws and drug development in India. Also listen “Vaccinating against COVID-19: How did we get so many vaccines so fast?" See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The Indian government is gearing up for mass COVID-19 vaccinations. The question foremost on everyone’s minds are how were they developed so fast. The first episode of this two-part series for the Suno India Show gives a step-by-step explanation of vaccine development and what is different this time around.  For this episode, we feature the expert voices of Dr Shaheed Jameel, currently the director of the Trivedi School of Biosciences at Ashoka University, and Dr Amar Jesani, an expert bioethicist and teacher who has founded the prestigious journal, Indian Journal of Medical Ethics. Also Listen “Vaccinating against COVID-19: Has the vaccine development been a fair and transparent process?“ See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
loading
Comments (10)

Rahul Kapoor

most of the sorry is picked from PTI's April article. it would have been nice to hear other point of view rather than one side of story.

Feb 23rd
Reply

Ateesh Baranawal

After listening your couple of episodes like on CAB, i am feeling you are quite biased. You are only against current government, why can't you be neutral and talk about atrocities on police also on CAB topic. Being against government is fine but bring both sides of the thoughts to your podcasts. I am tired of podcast who are either bhakts or only anti bjp. Why cant any podcast be neutral. unsubscribing your podcast. waste of time.

Dec 25th
Reply

Pratap Nair

Very informative good episode on Electoral Bonds

Nov 29th
Reply (1)

Rahul Kapoor

good conversation

Aug 16th
Reply (3)

ayush sharma

Audio quality is really poor

Jun 24th
Reply (1)
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store