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The Suno India Show

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The Suno India Show’ is a weekly news show by Suno India combining slow journalism with under-represented and under-reported stories. Covering the diverse range of topics like politics, technology, education and society, the host brings in informative interviews and engaging discussions with experts. The show not only shines a spotlight on stories that matter but keeps the listeners up to date with the latest national news.
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India is experiencing the second wave of COVID-19 cases since the first week of February. India is recording about a lakh cases on an average daily. The wave started from Maharashtra and Punjab, and has now extended to Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu among others. Maharashtra still accounts for half the cases in the country on a daily basis. Suno India’s Menaka Rao spoke to Dr Subhash Salunke, the technical advisor to the Maharashtra Government on Covid-19. He is a public health official and has worked as the director of Health Services in the state before he retired.  He spoke about the challenges for the state government in the second wave. He also explained why the state is suffering a huge number of cases both in the first wave and the second wave. See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
हम में से कई लोगों ने सुना होगा कि यौन उत्पीड़न और महिलाओं के साथ छेड़छाड़ के मामले में, हम हमेशा पुलिस में शिकायत दर्ज कर सकते हैं। हमने यह भी सुना है कि इनमें से कई शिकायतें आसानी से हल नहीं होती हैं और शिकायतकर्ता को बहुत साड़ी मश्कत करनी पड़ती हे। यौन उत्पीड़न की लिए जो कानून और दिशानिर्देश बने हुए हैं वो शिकायत करने वाली महिलाओं के बिना किसी अड़चन के शिकायत दर्ज़ करवाने के लिए बने हैं, पर हकीकत में ऐसा होता नहीं हे। लेकिन अगर हमे अपने अधिकारों के बारे में ज्ञान होगा तो ये निश्चित ही हमें अपने अधिकारों की मांग करने में मदद करेगा। द सनो इंडिया शो की इस कड़ी में, काम्या पांडेय ने दिल्ली के वकील अभिमन्यु तिवारी से बात की, और उनसे यौन अपराध के एक मामले में सभी कानूनी प्रक्रियां जैसे कि कैसे एफआईआर दर्ज होती हे, जांच के दौरान क्या होता है, पे चर्चा की | See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Kerala is a state with a majority of its workforce find an earning outside the state, and a major share are located at the Gulf countries due to many socio-economic and historical reasons. The Covid 19 pandemic affected the livelihood of these non-resident Indians or NRI workforce drastically. A major chunk of these NRI Keralites were forced to return to their native places during the Covid induced lock-down. A recent study by the Trivandrum based Centre for Development Studies (CDS) says that more than 8 lakhs from the Arabian countries returned due to the Covid pandemic. Among the 8 lakh gulf returnees, more than 6 lakh people returned jobless. This poses a major threat to the socio-economic fabric of the small state.   Not only the problems they face in their personal and livelihood matters, but a sudden appearance of a huge number of voters, who were on the voters list but was not able to cast their votes, will have an impact on the assembly election to be held in Kerala on April 6. In this episode, independent reporter Jaison G tries to understand the impact the international migrant labour community in Kerala will have on the upcoming Kerala assembly elections. See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
West Bengal’s unemployment rate was 17.4% in 2020, less than the national 23.5%. However, for many in Nandigram, employment is a distant dream. To outsiders, it may seem like this is their own doing for protesting so vehemently against industrialisation in 2007. It was their movement against the setting up of a SEZ across 10,000 acres by Indonesia-based Salim group, that changed the political history of West Bengal. It ended 34 years of Left Front rule and led to the victory of Mamata Banerjee’s Trinamool Congress. But for people who have raised and slayed governments, they struggle to make ends meet even after all these years. They say they want industrialisation that will provide them jobs, not upend their lives. In fact, there are acres of government land lying empty—reminders of unfulfilled promises of factories by successive governments. On this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee brings you a ground report from the most hotly contested seat in the West Bengal elections. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee is contesting against her former right hand man in the region, Suvendu Adhikari, who has now joined BJP. But who is to blame for the job crisis in the region? Listen in. See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
In this episode, we speak with senior reporters, Prachi Pinglay and Kunal Shankar who produced a podcast on the impact of fake news in India for On Spec, an independent podcast from Istanbul, Turkey. The episode– Love in the Times of Hate- will be published on April 3.   Shownotes: http://onspecpodcast.com/ See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
In October 2020, the lights went out in parts of Maharashtra, including Mumbai, the commercial capital of India. Cyber security group Recorded Future alleged that Chinese actors were responsible for the attack. Then around February 2021, Chinese interference was found in the IT systems of Bharat Biotech and Serum Institute, the manufacturers of Covaxin and Covishield, a cyber intelligence firm Cyfirma said. Cyber activity with Chinese links is especially worrying given the ongoing border tensions. However, China is not alone in snooping around our cyberspace. Elements from Russia, North Korea, Iran and even the USA have been detected.  In this episode, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee spoke to Raman Jit Singh Chima, the Asia Policy Director and Senior International Counsel at Access Now, which is an international digital rights organisation. He discussed the various breaches in our cybersecurity and how India needs to get a handle on this problem as soon as possible. See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On March 15 and 16th of 2021, the United Forum of Bank Unions called for a two day strike in order to oppose the proposed privatization of Public Sector Banks by the Centre.  The Finance Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman in her Union Budget Speech 2021-22 stated that the Centre wanted to privatise IDBI and two other banks. More than 10 lakh banking employees have gone on strike in March 2021 against privatisation.  Let's go down to the basics of banking- What is the function of banks, and how did they evolve. To get the answers to these fundamental questions on banking, Kunika Balhotra, Suno India’s Research and Communications Officer reached out to Amol Agrawal.  Amol is a faculty in the Economics Area at Amrut Mody School of Management at Ahmedabad University. He has about 10 years of Work Experience mainly as an economist in financial markets in Mumbai. He is an avid blogger and his blog is consistently ranked amidst top 100 economics blogs in the world. Check out his blogs, “Mostly Economics” here.  See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The whole nation appears to be watching the west Bengal state assembly election. The election will be conducted in 8 phases for 294 seats, from 27th march to 29th April. In the general election of 2019, the Bharatiya Janata Party won 18 seats, only 4 less than Trinamool’s 22 seats. The Rashtriya Janata Dal of Bihar and Samajwadi Party of Uttar Pradesh have extended their support to Banerjee, signalling the unity of regional parties against the national dominance of BJP.  On this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Sambit Pal, the author of Bengal Conundrum: Rise of the BJP and Future of the TMC. It examines how a traditionally leftist state is swinging right within just a few years. He is a senior journalist from West Bengal and an Assistant Professor at Indian Institute of Mass Communication, Dhenkanal. See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
In 2019, an estimated 26 lakh people fall sick with TB in India. Of these about 1.24 lakh have drug resistant tuberculosis.  On March 24, which is World TB Day, Suno India’s Menaka Rao speaks with Meera Yadav, a TB survivor and activist. She got TB in 2013, a few months after she delivered a child. She then suffered 8 years taking treatment for TB during which her lung was removed via surgery. She now works with a nonprofit with one of the government projects helping TB patients who seek treatment in the private sector. She recently moved the Bombay High Court along with health rights activist Brineille D’Souza with the plea that two drugs– Bedaquiline and Delamanid –which used to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis should be produced in India so that more patients can access it.  Additional reading: WHO Operational Handbook on Tuberculosis, 2020 Treating TB is hard, it is worse if you are a woman Why TB patients aren’t getting the drugs they need See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
According to the latest data released by the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy,  the unemployment rate in the country has increased to 6.9%. In this scenario, most people fall back on the government to provide them with work. Right to work is a directive principle in the Indian Constitution. The government has existing legislation guaranteeing right to work- the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act or NREGA – which mandates 100 days of work in a year for the poor in the rural areas. Several schemes were also announced by state governments to ensure work in urban areas too. To understand more about the government employment schemes in the country, Suno India’s Research and Communications Officer, Kunika Balhotra reached out to Rakshita Swamy, who leads the Social Accountability Forum for Action and Research.  She works towards advocating and institutionalising transparency, accountability, and citizen participation in governance, through her collaboration with central and state governments, and civil society organisations. She is associated with the Right to information and Right to Work campaigns. Additional Reading The Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act, 2005 International Labour Organization – Global Wage Report 2020-21: Wages and minimum wages in the time of COVID-19 Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The Covid-19 pandemic has shown us the need for good clinical trials in India – they help us figure out treatments that work and ones that don’t. But some of these studies have been marred by reports of ethical violations, creating hesitancy among the general public. There are checks and balances in the Indian clinical trial rules and other guidelines that are meant to prevent these violations. One of these checks is in the form of a body called the Ethics Committee. In this episode, we demystify this ethics committee. What is their role? Why do ethical irregularities keep cropping up? And what can ethics committees do to prevent them?  For this episode, Shreya Dasgupta spoke to Dr. Urmila Thatte, a clinical pharmacologist, bioethicist and Emeritus professor at the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital in Mumbai; Dr. Anant Bhan, a bioethics and global public health researcher at Yenepoya University in Mangalore; and Dr. Subhrojyoti Bhowmick, the clinical director for clinical research, academics and patient safety, at Peerless hospital at Kolkata. This episode was supported by a grant from the Thakur Family Foundation, which has not exercised any editorial control over the contents of the podcast. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
After recent tweets from Rihanna and Greta Thunberg raising concerns with Internet Shutdowns and Farm Protests in India, the Indian Government was unable to force Twitter to take down accounts of people supporting these protests, including accounts of media organizations like the caravan. The Government of India has now amended Intermediary Rules of 2011 and brought in new rules called Information Technology (Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code) Rules, 2021 granting more powers to the government. These rules try to regulate social media platforms, digital publication platforms like Netflix, Amazon Prime but also have included digital press publications under the Information Technology Act.  With these new rules, some publishers have approached the Delhi High Court challenging the limited portion of the regulating news media under these rules. The new intermediary rules try to regulate any organization with digital presence, but the way the Government wants to regulate them can harm the idea of open internet according to a statement from Mozilla Foundation. In this episode guest host, Srinivas Kodali spoke to Prashanth Sugathan, a lawyer with the Software Freedom Law Centre to explain to us what these new rules are and why the digital media publishers have approached the court. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On 3rd February, the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Science and Technology submitted its report on the DNA Technology Regulation Bill in the Rajya Sabha. If passed, the Bill will set up a national DNA database in the country for the first time. It would indefinitely store the DNA of offenders, suspects, undertrials, missing persons and unknown deceased persons. Two members of the Standing Committee filed dissent notes. AIMIM president Asaddudin Owaisi and CPI leader Binoy Viswam said that the report does not address privacy concerns and possible targeting of vulnerable communities. Both advised compliance with the Supreme Court’s Puttaswamy judgment on privacy rights. In this episode, we examine these arguments. Our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Rohin Garg, Associate Policy Counsel at Internet Freedom Foundation. He was one of the experts consulted by the Standing Committee for its report. Puttaswamy v. India Standing Committee Report on DNA Bill  Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On 3rd February, the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Science and Technology submitted its report on the DNA Technology Regulation Bill in the Rajya Sabha. If passed, the bill will set up a national DNA database in the country for the first time. The Bill aims to identify and store the DNA of offenders, suspects, undertrials, missing persons and unknown deceased persons. Public relations agency Ogilvy India and government affairs consultancy firm Gordon Thomson Honeywell have been supporting the Bill with their campaign #DNAfightsRape. Although the Bill goes much beyond sexual assaulters alone, the #DNAfightsRape campaign focuses on how it could benefit sexual assault victims in particular.  In this episode, we explore how DNA is used in criminal investigations and how the science of DNA is addressed by the Bill. Our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Shreya Rastogi, founder of Project 39A at National Law University, and Rohin Garg, Associate Policy Counsel at Internet Freedom Foundation. You will also hear speakers from Ogilvy’s webinar, Dr GK Goswami, the Inspector General of Police in Uttar Pradesh, and Vanessa Lynch, a senior government affairs consultant at Gordon Thomas Honeywell and the founder of The DNA Project and The DNA Project Africa. Standing Committee Report on DNA Bill  Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Independent journalist Srishti Jaswal was trolled online for a comment on a movie last year. Jaswal and her colleague, Shreegireesh Jalihal then investigated the group – Hindu IT cell- that organised the online trolling and the legal action against her and many other people who they felt insulted Hindu gods and goddesses. A story about this investigation has been published on the news website, Newslaundry. Menaka Rao from Suno India Show interviewed these two journalists and found out how they conducted this investigation. We also have published the interviews with the members of the IT cell in this show. Also read: Newslaundry story on Hindu IT cell Srishti’s story Twitter handle of Hindu IT cell Sushmita Sinha’s Instagram story on Teej Hindu IT cell’s Twitter handle response to mobbing outside Advocate Deepika Rajawat’s house See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
There are more than 8,000 documented rare diseases in the world. An estimated 70-90 million Indians are said to be rare individuals. Most rare diseases are incurable, and where there are cures, the costs are prohibitive for patients and families. Rare diseases can also lead to disabilities. Yet why is that there is little public awareness of rare diseases? This #RareDiseaseDay2021, hear the stories of people who have been part of the 1 in 20,000 podcast series. Launched in 2019, the series offers a window into the lives of rare individuals, their search for proper medical diagnosis, treatment, and well-being. Rare Lives is the second season of the 1 in 20,000 podcast series. This series has sought to go beyond the stereotypes associated with rare individuals, who often end up being statistics in public conversation. For instance, it is said that the prevalence of a rare illness – FSHD – is 1 in 20,000 children. The series, however, dives into the perspectives, joys, challenges and motivations of rare individuals and their support systems. The upcoming session is a rare chance to see the human face behind the podcast episodes. They represent countless patients, families, caregivers, doctors, activists, and geneticists working to improve the life of every person who is living with a rare disease in India. For this episode of The Suno India show, Avantika Shrivastava spoke with Vipul Goyal, Shambhavi Ravishankar, Iftikhar Zia and Dr. Priyanshu Mathur. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On 12th January, the Haryana police arrested Nodeep Kaur, a Dalit labour activist while she was protesting against the non-payment of wages at Kundali industrial area (KIA) at Sonipat, Haryana. Kaur is from Punjab and the leader of Mazdoor Adhikar Sangathan, who is supporting ongoing farmer’s protests at the Haryana and UP border. US Vice President's niece Meena Harris tweeted her picture asking her to release brought her to notice. Farmer’s uprising circling National Capital got momentum and support across the globe, which asked the Central government to repeal three farms laws, which was passed through ordinance last year. United farmers organizations had 11 rounds of talks with the government and submitted 8 point charter. That demand includes the law on Minimum Support Price or MSP and repeals those three laws, which are related to open market trading, contractual farming, and excluding many products from the essential commodity list. The one issue, which is still missing from the farmer’s protest and on their agenda is Landless farmers or farm laborers issues. The 2011 census data shows that 71% of Dalits are landless laborers. In rural areas, 58.4% of Dalit households do not own land at all. Landless farmers belong to Dalit and Backward community with depressed wages and vulnerable to caste atrocity on daily basis. The host of this episode of The Suno India Show, Prashant Kanojia spoke to Nodeep Kaur’s sister, Rajvir Kaur and her mother, Swarnjit Kaur. We also spoke to farmer leaders and protestors from the protest site and a journalist from Bihar. While explaining how the farm laws would affect landless farmers, they also highlighted the issues related to landless farmers and labourers, which has been undermined and is not on the agenda of the ongoing protest. They explain how these farmers are not recognized as farmers and how they could widen the protest across India.  See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
On February 5, Jammu & Kashmir government spokesperson Rohit Kansal tweeted that  4G mobile internet services have been restored in the entire Jammu and Kashmir area. The high-speed internet service was snapped by the government in August 2019 after the BJP led central government revoked Article 370 & downgraded the erstwhile state into two union territories. The low-speed or 2G Internet service on mobile phones was restored on January 25th, 2020. The host of this episode of The Suno India Show, Irfan Amin Malik spoke to YouTubers, employees, students, journalists and others from different areas of Kashmir valley, who said that the high-speed internet that they recall has not been restored yet.  The people also recalled how  their daily life was hit back during the world’s longest internet shutdowns. Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
The arrest of 22-year-old climate activist Disha Ravi has raised a number of questions. She has been charged with conspiracy and sedition for editing a google document, a toolkit supporting the farmers’ protests. The Delhi Police arrested Ravi from Bengaluru without a transit remand order. The police did not inform her chosen lawyers of her remand hearing and provided her with a legal aid lawyer instead. Then the magistrate ordered five days of police custody.  On this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Colin Gonsalves, a Senior Advocate of the Supreme Court and the founder of Human Rights Law Network. Gonsalves says that even people protesting peacefully and legally can be arrested by the police illegally. However, he gives legal advice on how those arrested can speak up for their rights before the police and the court. Legal precedents and guidelines cited by him are linked below.  DK Basu guidelines Arnesh Kumar vs State Of Bihar MHA advisory on arresting an accused outside State/UT jurisdiction  See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
Recently several states including Uttar Pradesh introduced anti-conversion laws making religious conversion for the sake of marriage illegal. These laws were based on the conspiracy theory of ‘love jihad’ which posits that Muslim men marry Hindu women only to convert them to Islam. We bring a three-part series on how these laws have affected the lives of young people. With a growing narrative of ‘Love Jihad’ across India, we look at this phenomenon in West Bengal and its ties to Hindutva politics. Devdutta Maji is the founder of Singha Bahini, a Hindutva outfit that claims to ‘rescue’ Hindu women trapped by Muslim men across the state. He has also joined BJP and hopes to help the party win in the upcoming state polls. TMC MLA Rukbanur Rahman has personally experienced the opposition to interfaith marriages in the state. His brother Rizwanur Rahman had wed Priyanka Todi, the daughter of industrialist Ashok Todi, and died a month later. He says that not only is ‘Love Jihad’ a misnomer, the idea will not be accepted by the people of Bengal. In this episode of The Suno India Show, our reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to Rahman, Majhi and a minor girl who Majhi says he rescued. Also listen: How ‘love jihad’ laws clash with The Special Marriage Act How ‘love jihad’ affects women’s choice Important links: Living Reality of Muslims in West Bengal – Appeasement or Exclusion?  The Special Marriage Act, 1954 Being an editorially independent platform, we rely on you to help us bring in untold stories that have the potential for social change. Do consider supporting us! See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.
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Comments (10)

Rahul Kapoor

most of the sorry is picked from PTI's April article. it would have been nice to hear other point of view rather than one side of story.

Feb 23rd
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Ateesh Baranawal

After listening your couple of episodes like on CAB, i am feeling you are quite biased. You are only against current government, why can't you be neutral and talk about atrocities on police also on CAB topic. Being against government is fine but bring both sides of the thoughts to your podcasts. I am tired of podcast who are either bhakts or only anti bjp. Why cant any podcast be neutral. unsubscribing your podcast. waste of time.

Dec 25th
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Pratap Nair

Very informative good episode on Electoral Bonds

Nov 29th
Reply (1)

Rahul Kapoor

good conversation

Aug 16th
Reply (3)

ayush sharma

Audio quality is really poor

Jun 24th
Reply (1)
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