DiscoverThe Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales
The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

Author: Alan Seales & Broadway Podcast Network

Subscribed: 43Played: 1,103
Share

Description

Intimate, personal conversations with the biggest talents from professional theatre, tv, film, and more. Hear their secrets, what makes them laugh, stresses them out, and how they manage the anxiety of success. We feature both stars and creatives such as producers, stage managers, directors, press and marketing agents, or even the people who own the theaters or productions themselves.​This is a podcast for artists, made by artists. With over 2 decades of experience in film and theatre both as cast and creative, host Alan Seales speaks with Broadway, TV, film and beyond’s biggest talents to learn more about not only how the world of theatre and performing operate, but also what makes it so real and human. In-depth, personal, behind-the-scenes conversations will highlight special details of the industry that most people may not know exist, will always find out what makes the guests love their craft, what makes them tick, and what truly inspires them.Part of the Broadway Podcast Network.

147 Episodes
Reverse
Part2: This 2-time Tony-nominated actor made his Broadway debut in Wicked as 2008 as Boq, and since then has gone on to roles in Assassins, Matilda the Musical, Big Fish, and School of Rock where he originated the role of Dewey Finn, earning him his first Tony nomination. His TV/Film credits include Royal Pains, The Good Fight, and Documentary Now! among many others, He now holds the title role in Beetlejuice on Broadway which brought him his second Tony nomination. This interview shows a unique and different side of Alex. Known as the funny man, he has a deeply real part of himself that he taps into before every performance. Connect with Alex online: Twitter: @ABrightMonster Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcastTheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Jillian's personal Instagram: @jillianhochman Email us at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. We want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Part1: This 2-time Tony-nominated actor made his Broadway debut in Wicked as 2008 as Boq, and since then has gone on to roles in Assassins, Matilda the Musical, Big Fish, and School of Rock where he originated the role of Dewey Finn, earning him his first Tony nomination. His TV/Film credits include Royal Pains, The Good Fight, and Documentary Now! among many others, He now holds the title role in Beetlejuice on Broadway which brought him his second Tony nomination. This interview shows a unique and different side of Alex. Known as the funny man, he has a deeply real part of himself that he taps into before every performance. Connect with Alex online: Twitter: @ABrightMonster Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcastTheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Jillian's personal Instagram: @jillianhochman Email us at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. We want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
From Broadway performer to Broadway educator, this performer opens up about the teachers that became his mentors, setting him on his unique course, and urgently encourages us all - “Don’t let your parade pass you by!”  Robert Hartwell is a Broadway performer and Founder of The Broadway Collective. His Broadway credits include Hello, Dolly! starring Bette Midler, Motown The Musical, Cinderella, Nice Work If You Can Get It, and Memphis, as well as the National Tours of Dreamgirls and Motown The Musical. As a Director/Choreographer Robert’s work has been seen at Lincoln Center, Music Theatre Wichita, Pace University, Naples Performing Arts Center, and The University of Michigan. He also served as the Assistant Director on the First National Tour of Once On This Island. Robert is a member of the Tony Award winning Broadway Inspirational Voices, and is currently the Associate Artist at North Carolina Theatre.  Robert opens up about his teaching journey. At the height of his Broadway success, Robert realized that although he loved performing, his true passion was teaching the arts. This led him to create The Broadway Collective, a musical theatre training academy where he and his team of performing arts professionals train the next generation of Broadway stars. In order for this endeavor to be successful, Robert discusses the Imposter Syndrome he defeated by realizing that his value was not attached to being in a Broadway show. He also talks with us about his working relationship with Eric Woodall, which has allowed him to return to North Carolina Theatre as an Associate Artist, as well as a director and choreographer.  In this episode, we talk about:  Working on Memphis at NCT before COVID-19 forced them to close Founding The Broadway Collective  Building trust in your company  Focusing on self-care with his students, before their 16-bar cuts  The spiritual moment he experienced nightly in Hello, Dolly!  Principal v. Ensemble journeys Connect with Robert: The Broadway Collective IG: @SirRobertTakesPics Twitter: @SirRobTweets Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
This Tony nominated actress made her Broadway debut in 1993 in Blood Brothers, before starring in shows such as Beauty and the Beast, Le Mis, Hairspray, Little Shop, Xanadu, Rock of Ages, Catch Me If You Can, Disaster!, and Mean Girls. She has numerous on screen credits such as 30 Rock, Cupid, The Mindy Project, Blue Bloods, and Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life. She is now staring as Barbara Maitland in Beetlejuice on Broadway. After starting her performing career at age 3 in a Fab TV commercial, she continued her passion all the way through college - where she ended up taking her first voice lesson. It was then she learned how to belt. She didn't realize until she lost her voice right out of college during a European tour of Oklahoma! that she was actually belting incorrectly. Going into this vocal injury and more, this episode also covers what a "psoas" is (and why she injured hers), her time studying with Liz Kaplan, why she decided to adopt her two beautiful daughters, and even what happened to the Off-Broadway hit Bat Boy after 9/11. Connect with Kerry online: Instagram: @kerrybutler1 Twitter: @kerrybutlernyc Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcastTheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Jillian's personal Instagram: @jillianhochman Email us at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. We want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Rebecca Moore, better known as Rebecca Vocal Athlete, is a vocal coach, mentor, singer, songwriter, YouTuber and entertainer with more than 20 years of experience within the music industry. She provides ongoing professional training in reputable vocal techniques, methodologies, vocal anatomy, physiology, and voice research. Over the years, Rebecca has cultivated a massive social media following with her videos, particularly on YouTube. Her 2018 album “Black and White Sunset” is currently available on Spotify and iTunes, as is her 2020 EP “Golden Daffodils”.  Based in England, Rebecca’s fascination with music started very young; her father recalls her dancing in front of the TV when she was 2 years old. As a child, she quickly fell in love with voice, sound, music, and even doing impressions. This soon evolved into a love for songwriting and all of the ways “we express ourselves”.  Rebecca speaks candidly about her struggle with depression and anxiety over the years, and the impact negative self talk can have on our bodies. She opens up about the operation she had in 2016 to remove a non-cancerous tumor, involving the removal of one of her ovaries, and shares that the recovery afterwards was “the worst” as she wasn’t able to walk for a while. However, it was also during this time that Rebecca delved into self-improvement, meditation, yoga, and a journey to expand her platform on YouTube. With 1.14 million subscribers, Rebecca’s reach continues to grow as she helps people all over the world learn about their voices and gain confidence in their art.  In this episode, we talk about:  Her interest in the physiology of the voice How she would conduct a lesson with a new student Inviting failure  The YouTube journey  Her operation in 2016  Dealing with internet trolls Connect with RVA: YouTube IG: @RebeccaVocalAthlete Twitter: @RVA_Official On the web Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
After winning the 2018 Jimmy Award for Best Performance by an Actor, Andrew Barth Feldman found his way -- at the age of 16 -- into the title role of Evan Hansen in Dear Evan Hansen, his first professional gig, ever. We cover his humble upbringings, falling in love with theatre, being discovered by Stacey Mindich and Tara Rubin, deciding to leave high school to be on Broadway, and beyond. UPDATE March 4, 2021: ABF scores a breakout role on High School Musical: The Series on Disney+! Connect with Andrew online: Instagram: @andrewbfeldman_Twitter: @andrewbfeldman Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcastTheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Jillian's personal Instagram: @jillianhochman Email us at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. We want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
"I only ever want to be Ben Harper famous." Drew Gasparini is an award winning musical theatre songwriter and performer. Currently he is writing the scores for a number of new stage musicals including the Broadway-bound adaptation of The Karate Kid, an adaptation of Night Shift for Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures, and an adaptation of the Ned Vizzini novel/film It's Kind of a Funny Story for Universal Theatrical Group (book by Alex Brightman), among others. Some of Drew’s original musicals include Crazy Just Like Me (winner of “Best Of Fest” and runner up for “Best Book” in the New York Musical Theatre Festival 2011), and Make Me Bad (book by Alex Brightman, Bloomington Playwrights Project, winner of PACE New Musicals). Drew was a contributing composer for the fictional musical Hit List on the NBC series Smash, and in 2019 wrote the music for Skittles Commercial: The Broadway Musical, a highly publicized PR stunt starring Michael C. Hall for Super Bowl LIII. He has released several of his own albums, and on January 13th, Drew launched his new podcast "Now We're Talking with Drew Gasparini" on the Broadway Podcast Network.    Born and raised in southern California, his father a drummer and his mother a music teacher, Drew recalls that “music was like water, food, and oxygen” in his household. But it was ultimately his music teacher in high school who, after listening to some of his original songs (which he began writing when he was 12), challenged him to work harder and inspired him to dedicate his life to songwriting.    Drew chronicles the journey which took him from living out of his car in LA, to writing his first musical and moving to New York City; where a few years later, he put up a concert of his songs starring Titus Burgess, Jeremy Jordan, and others. He shares that some of the best education he’s had has come from failing in New York, and reiterates that there are going to be down moments for all artists, but if you love it, you have to stick with it. Drew has signed 5 contracts for projects which were Broadway bound but never made it, which he says only makes him hungrier - “I want to write something that’s left behind in a big way.” This dream could just be on the horizon, as Drew recollects landing his current big project - writing the score for the Broadway bound adaptation of Karate Kid.    In this episode, we talk about:  Wanting to be Ben Harper famous  Getting “permission” from success The first song he ever wrote at age 12 Leaving school to travel the west coast with his band “Drew G and the B” Creating his “Now We’re Talking” podcast  Connect with Drew: Subscribe to his podcast IG: @drewgasparini Twitter: @drewgasparini Listen to him on Spotify Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Stephanie Hsu is a familiar face on both the stage and screen, maybe best known for originating the role of Christine in Be More Chill at Two River Theater, and then on Broadway. She previously made her Broadway debut as Karen the Computer in the original cast of Spongebob Squarepants: The Broadway Musical. Her TV and Film credits include The Path (seasons 1-3), Set It Up, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Awkwafina is Nora from Queens, Asking For It, and Mei in The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Born in Torrance, CA, Stephanie shares that it was mostly just her and her mom growing up. The two clashed at times - her mother was not sure America was built for her as an immigrant, while Stephanie was “adamant about being an American.” As a child, Stephanie was very into basketball, and fought against the urge to become a “drama geek”. But when a fellow classmate in high school arranged an audition for her with the drama teacher, it “launched everything”, including heading to NYU to study acting.  Stephanie stresses the importance of visibility in the arts, and candidly talks with us about her role on The Marvelous Maisel - Mei, who as a bilingual, strong and independent Chinese American woman in the 1960’s, was “unlike any character” she’d ever seen in her life. During our conversation, Stephanie continues to bring us back to themes of “love”, sharing, “Love has always been my favorite thing in the whole world,” (her college thesis was about love). When she was recently commissioned by Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, to create a piece of self expression, she found herself in the silence of the pandemic trying to understand “if being in love is ok”. Stephanie walks us through the creation of her piece “Another Love Letter”, where she battled between feeling the desire and responsibility as an artist to be productive and to make something big, but also feeling drawn to explore the poetic parts of quiet simplicity.  In this episode, we talk about:  Creating her virtual commission “Another Love Letter”  One of her favorite things to do at museums  Working on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel The importance of making work you care about with people you care about  Her journey to landing a role in the new film Everything Everywhere All At Once Connect with Stephanie: Watch Another Love Letter IG: @hsulace Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Maybe best known for his starring role as Mark St. James on Ugly Betty (opposite Vanessa Williams), Michael Urie is not only a star of the stage and screen, but also a director and executive producer. He originated the role of Arnold in the Broadway revival of Torch Song (after receiving Lucille Lortel Award and Drama League Award nominations in the off-Broadway production), as well as the role of Brian in Grand Horizons on Broadway. Other stage credits include How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, High Buttons Shoes, The Government Inspector, Angels in America, and his award winning performance in Buyer and Cellar. Michael’s other TV and film credits include Modern Family, Workaholics, Younger, The Good Fight, Beverly Hills Chihuahua, and a guest judge on RuPauls Drag Race. Michael can currently be heard in As the Curtain Rises, Broadway's first podcast soap opera, and is part of a digital performance of a new play called Smithtown, which premieres online February 13th. Although born in Houston, Texas, Michael grew up outside of Dallas, and as a child loved and wanted to make movies. It was eventually his high school theater teacher who encouraged and challenged him to pursue his passions for directing and acting, and a poetry competition where he discovered his comedic chops, that led him on his journey to Juilliard.  Looking back on the beginning of his career post college, Michael opens up about the first time he auditioned for a TV pilot, while also balancing being in play. Although that particular pilot didn’t get picked up, Michael chronicles how the experience guided him to his starring role on Ugly Betty a few years later. He also shares his thoughts on film acting vs. theater acting, and “the feat of watching a theater artist go on the journey in front of you right then and there”. Michael talks with us about how he was able to incorporate this feat in his newest project Smithtown, a play which was adapted for Zoom and shot virtually.  In this episode, we talk about:  Finding his footing in high school theater class Falling in love with Shakespeare and the classics  His first TV pilot audition, a flop, and Ugly Betty a few years later Working with Vanessa Williams on Ugly Betty  His new project, Smithtown His approach to and opinion on social media Connect with Michael: IG: @MichaelUrieLikesIt Twitter: @MichaelUrie Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“It’s going to be bumpy, but it’s going to be worth it”. Colin Donnell is a singer, actor, and musician who has starred on both the stage and screen. His stage credits include the Broadway productions of Jersey Boys, Violet, and Anything Goes (for which he received a Drama Desk Award nomination), as well as many national tours including Mamma Mia! and Wicked. Colin made his TV debut in ABC’s Pan Am alongside names like Christina Ricci and Margot Robbie, and has since appeared on Person of Interest, The Affair, Chicago PD, and both Arrow and Chicago Med as a series regular. Off of the stage and screen, Colin is also an incredible musician. While in quarantine, he and bandmate Brian Usifer formed The Nineteen Twenty, and their debut album Chaos + Cocktails is now available on all music streaming platforms.  A native of St. Louis, Missouri, Colin shares he “basically lived the High School Musical in reality”. He was “a sports kid” for most of his life, until freshman year of high school when he broke his ankle playing football. On a whim, and because he could juggle, Colin auditioned for the school production of Barnum. The rest is history.  Speaking about his career, Colin opens up about what keeps it fun and interesting - continually striving to improve, grow, and tell the next story in a new and exciting way. He touches on the inevitable self doubt that creeps in when you share your work, but how freeing his newest project with The Nineteen Twenty has been, allowing him and Brian to focus on making the kind of music they want to make - something they could be proud of amid the shadow of a pandemic. Colin also talks about looking forward to the inevitable “explosion of creativity” in the years ahead, born out of the COVID-19 era - “what’s to come is going to be really special”. In this episode, we talk about:  The inspiration behind, and creation of his new band The Nineteen Twenty  Giving himself permission to quit performing  His experience doing his first straight play  Something he admires about wife Patti Murin His love/hate relationship with social media  Eleven O'Clock Number: The wine he and Patti collaborated on for Nocking Point Wines  Connect with Colin: IG: TheNineteenTwenty IG: @ColinDonnell Twitter: @ColinDonnell Listen to TheNineteenTwenty Drink his wine! Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Catapulting into the limelight after originating the role of Michael Mell in Be More Chill on Broadway, George Salazar speaks candidly about struggling with his identity growing up, as a child of a Filipino immigrant and an Ecuadorian immigrant. Watch the full video of this episode here. He recently created a video exploring his self discovery, titled “My Identity”, as part of a virtual commission he received from Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim. George also opens up about his goals as an artist moving forward - creating work for people that look like him, so they too feel like anything is possible.  Born and raised in Florida, George shares that theater and Broadway weren’t a part of his family’s life - “I didn’t know what a musical was,” he says. But he loved entertaining, and admits he was always the class clown in school. George “accidentally” discovered theater his junior year of high school, after singing his own Weird Al inspired parody in computer class and being asked to audition for the school's production of Little Shop of Horrors. George earned a BFA in Musical Theater from University of Florida, moved straight to NYC, and made his Broadway debut a few years later.  In this episode, we talk about:  The inspiration behind “My Identity”  Why he decided to move to LA  How he discovered theater  Interning in NYC during FL summer stock seasons, because no one would cast him The exact moment he freed himself from the need for validation  How and why his artistic process during The Lightning Thief was different from others Connect with George: Watch "My Identity" Instagram: @georgesalazar Twitter: @georgesalazar Web: www.thegeorgesalazar.com/ Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“The key to success is figuring out how to survive in an industry that needs you, but doesn’t want you.” Keith Powell is best known as series regular James “Toofer” Spurlock on NBC’s Emmy-winning sitcom 30 Rock, where he received the 2008 Screen Actors Guild Award for Comedy Ensemble. Recently, Keith has mostly focused on writing and directing. He is currently writing a feature for Film 44 and HBO Films, and is set to direct his first film, Buffalo. Keith also directs for TV, having helmed an episode of NBC’s Superstore. After 30 Rock, Keith wrote, directed and starred in every episode of his web series, Keith Broke His Leg (which also starred his wife), for which he won two Indie Series Awards - Best Comedy and Best Actor. Keith boasts a strong theatre background as well having previously run his own theater company, and performed at The Old Globe in San Diego. You can currently catch Keith playing Garret on NBC’s Connecting, and Dr. Vance on This Is Us. Although born in Philadelphia, Keith spent much of his childhood in Monterey, CA before moving back east around the age of twelve, and making Delaware home. After many years participating in community theater (along with other Delaware natives like John Gallagher Jr. and Aubrey Plaza), Keith attended NYU and made New York City his home.  During our conversation, Keith talks in detail about what the filming process was like for Connecting on NBC, a show set entirely on Zoom and mostly shot on iPhones. He also takes us back to his days with 30 Rock, the show where “he learned how to work in TV”, and shares his journey to landing the role of Toofer. Keith opens up about struggling to find “his own artistic comedic voice” after 30 Rock ended, and how a minor surgery led to the first inspirations for his own web series, Keith Broke His Leg. He now lives in Los Angeles, and along with directing, writing, and acting, each year Keith also mentors a new group of students fresh out of NYU as they begin navigating their careers in LA.  In this episode, we talk about:  What a typical shoot day for Connecting involved  His Grandmother’s saying - “What's yours will know your face.” How he views himself as an artist and storyteller  His experience working on 30 Rock  Starting his own theater company after college, and Lynn Redgrave performing The inspiration behind Kevin Broke His Leg  Being resilient in an industry full of rejection Connect with Keith: Instagram: @bykeithpowell Twitter: @keithpowell Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
As the host of NY1’s “On Stage” and a microphone for the theatre community, this Emmy Award winner's stories have shifted from Broadway openings and red carpet events, to how people are surviving and pivoting while Broadway is on hold. Frank DiLella is the Emmy Award winning host of “On Stage” on Spectrum News NY1, the news channel’s weekly half-hour theater program. His celebrity interviews, along with his in-depth reporting of the theatrical scene, have helped make him a household name in the theater and entertainment communities in New York City, as well as around the globe. Since joining NY1 in 2004, he has interviewed many legendary artists including Tom Hanks, Vanessa Redgrave, Nathan Lane, Elton John, Liza Minnelli, Patti LuPone, Bette Midler, Bernadette Peters, Hugh Jackman, Lin-Manuel Miranda, James Earl Jones, Chita Rivera, Jane Fonda, Ben Vereen, Angela Lansbury, Tony Kushner, Andrew Lloyd Webber and more. Frank is the recipient of 3 New York Press Club Awards including 1 in 2019 for his special on the Broadway revival of Angels in America – and the other in 2020 for his special on Network. He’s made multiple big and small screen appearances as “himself” including The Prom – opposite Meryl Streep, Smash, The Little Voice, and The Forty Year Old Version. Frank is also an adjunct professor teaching theater journalism at his alma mater Fordham University at Lincoln Center.  Born and raised in Philadelphia, Frank always loved theater as a kid (but he also loved watching Dateline NBC and America’s Most Wanted). He grew up performing, and participated in the school musicals throughout his childhood. Frank fell in love with New York City, and after moving to attend Fordham University to pursue Broadway aspirations, an Intro to Media Studies class and an internship at Spectrum News NY1 altered his course.  During our conversation, Frank talks about how he created an outlet for himself in the industry, and became a voice in the community. “Being on air, and being a reporter, and being in journalism...” is similar to acting and to theater because you are still telling stories, he shares. He also reveals that “that little fix or high” you get when you’re on stage happens all the same while he is on air reporting, or hosting events. Frank opens up about his work during COVID - and how he sees himself as a microphone/platform for the community, helping them get the word out there in both good times and bad.  In this episode, we talk about:  Being a theater kid  Moving to NYC to pursue performing  The callback and internship opportunities which helped determine his career path  How he worked his way up the ladder at NY1 Covering the 2007 Broadway stagehand strike The one thing he always says to his students  Filming “The Prom” with Meryl Streep Connect with Frank: Instagram: @fdilella Twitter: @fdilella Watch "On Stage" Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Let's face it -- 2020 was a dumpster fire, at best. In this episode, Diana Salameh, the Director of Marketing and Communications at Serino Coyne, co-hosts the final episode of the year - a year which has been unprecedented for the theatre industry. And not only for performers. Serino Coyne, the nation's longest-running theatrical advertising agency, was just embarking on the beginning of the Spring theater season - openings, etc - when Broadway suddenly shut down. Diana and Alan discuss everything from their favorite shows they were able to see before everything closed, the blossoming of virtual storytelling mediums, and missing the shared experience of seeing live theater in general. Reminiscing on seeing SIX in early March, Diana shares her excitement for Broadway to reopen because SIX is “the kind of show that New Yorkers and tourists, everybody is going to need to lift our spirits... and help us escape.” Like all theatre lovers, Alan and Diana both agree there’s nothing quite like sitting in a room full of strangers and going on an emotional journey with them. But in lieu of live theater, they discuss two productions from this year that were able to recreate this sort of communal shared experience really well - Hamilton and What The Constitution Means To Me. Diana also opens up what she has been doing in order to remain connected with her clients and their fans. She shares “the thing that has been the biggest rock for me is the Broadway Women’s Alliance”, a community of women on the business side of Broadway. Founded officially in January of this year, and focused on connection and empowerment, the Broadway Women’s Alliance has held about a dozen events for over 500 women in the industry during the course of the lockdown. In this episode, we talk about:  The first shows they saw in 2020 Seeing SIX the musical Diana’s Christmas theater tradition with her best friend  New creativity being born on virtual mediums  Which of Henry VIII wives they each would be  The Tony Awards  The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade  Connect with Diana: Instagram: @_dianasalameh Twitter: @_dianasalameh Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Krystal Joy Brown is a singer, dancer and actor who made her Broadway debut in 2009 in Hair. She is best known for her portrayal of Diana Ross in the Broadway musical Motown: The Musical. Her other Broadway credits include Leap of Faith, Big Fish, and Hamilton, where she will return to the role of Eliza when the industry returns. She is also a two-time Adele and Fred Astaire nominee for best female dancer in a Broadway show. Krystal voices the character of Netossa in the DreamWorks/Netflix animated series She-Ra Princesses of Power, and her other TV appearances include the Disney film MAGIC CAMP (Disney+), NBC’s Law & Order: SUV, Hulu’s Deadbeat, ABC’s Castle, Disney’s Sydney to the Max, and most recently, Hallmark Channels "One Royal Holiday" with Aaron Tveit & Laura Osnes. Krystal is an avid activist in mental health, wellness, and social justice, and co-host’s the podcast, HOW WE DO THIS. Krystal grew up in the DC area, part of a family where many worked for the government - her mother for FEMA, her grandparents for the Pentagon, and her father as a police officer. For Krystal, being civilly and civically engaged was ingrained early on, and was always important. She recently hosted several virtual letter writing parties with VoteWriters.org, an organization that focuses on providing Voter ID assistance, which is now assisting Georgia voters for the runoff election. During our conversation Krystal illustrates how she has brought her activism to her art. While performing in Motown: The Musical, and in the streets protesting Treyvon Martin’s murder, she created a podcast called HOW WE DO THIS (a “female feminist political podcast”), which became a platform for conversations about mental health. And now, as part of the company of Hamilton, she takes an active role on the Hamilton Racial Justice Task Force. Krystal also champions self care. She opens up about going to therapy for the first time, and how it helped unlock her ability to be vulnerable onstage, and more deeply connect with audiences as Eliza Hamilton. In this episode, we talk about:  Growing up in a politically active family  Her reaction to the 2016 election  AOC, and being “radical”  Ancestral healing  The Hamilton Racial Justice Task Force  The importance of understanding and processing your internal life, before using it in your work onstage Connect with KJB: On the web: https://www.thekjb.com Twitter: @KrystalJoyBrown Instagram: @KrystalJoyBrown Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Michael James Scott is an actor and singer who originated the role of Genie in the Australian production of Disney's musical Aladdin, which opened in Sydney in August 2016. He received a Helpmann Award in 2017 for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical for his work in this production. Michael reprised his role as the Genie on the North American tour, The West End, and most recently, Broadway (where he will return when theaters reopen). He also originated the role of The Minstrel on Broadway in Something Rotten!, as well as Dr. Gostwana in the original Broadway company of The Book of Mormon. Other Broadway credits include Mamma Mia, Tarzan, All Shook Up, The Pirate Queen, Elf, and Hair. Off-Broadway, he co-starred in Here’s to the Public! opposite Donna McKechnie and was also part of the concert cast of Jerry Springer: The Opera at Carnegie Hall. Michael can be seen in the new Showtime TV series Black Monday, and recently released his first studio album, A Fierce Christmas, available now on all music platforms.  Michael was born in Baltimore, MD, but moved to Orlando, FL with his family when he was five years old. As a child he “just wanted to sing and dance” no matter where he was - the grocery store, the doctors office, etc, and according to his mom, Michael sang before he spoke. Recognizing his creative energy and talent, one of Michael’s elementary school teachers helped guide him towards the world of auditioning for TV and commercials, and participating in children's singing groups, and he “was hooked”. Michael later earned his BFA from The Conservatory of Theatre Arts program at Webster University in St. Louis, MO; and while in college, he went on to be the standby for Ben Vereen on the international tour of Fosse. While Michael might now be well known for his role as the Genie, in our conversation he admits that the role was never even on his radar. He opens up about the preconceived notions that came along with the role, the pressure - and shares that once the creative team behind Aladdin gave him permission to just be himself, he was able to bring his inner singing and dancing child from youth onto the stage with him. Michael also talks to us about the inspiration behind his brand new debut studio album, A Fierce Christmas, which is out now. Citing the current pandemic, as well as the “racial awakening” in the country, Michael says of his album, “this was my protest… I’m gonna protest with joy.”  In this episode, we talk about:  The year 2020 being the year of the “pivot” The impact of the theater community on society as a whole  Having parents who just said “yes” The inspiration behind and production of his album, A Fierce Christmas  His “Ah ha” moment while playing the Genie  The advice Ben Vereen once gave him Connect with MJS: Get his album and visit him online: https://www.michaeljamesscott.com/ Twitter: @iammjscott Instagram: @iammjscott Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nik Walker is an artist, educator, and activist who made his Broadway debut in Motown The Musical. He spent 3 years with the Broadway and touring companies of Hamilton, adding both Aaron Burr and George Washington to his resume. Other stage credits include Peter and the Starcatcher (off-Broadway), and regional productions at La Jolla Playhouse, The Old Globe and The Denver Center, to name a few. He can also be seen on TV in Law & Order: SVU. Nik is a self-proclaimed cinefile and theme park nerd, and co-hosts his own movie analysis podcast called Little Justice The Podcast. He also co-hosts a video series on Broadwayworld.com called The Chaos Twins. Nik currently leads the Broadway cast of Ain’t Too Proud playing Otis Williams, and is an adjunct professor at his alma mater, New York University. Nik shares that his mother worked a job as a news anchor when he was growing up, so she wasn’t really home a lot. So it was movies that played babysitter and kept his imagination going. But movies and stories played an even bigger and more important role in focusing him as a child after he was diagnosed with ADHD, eventually leading to his early involvement in theater. And later, a BFA in Theater from NYU.  During our conversation, Nik speaks candidly about coming to Broadway with very little dance background, sharing that Motown was his first brush with dancing professionally and getting paid for it. He shares memories of intense dance training for Ain’t Too Proud while still on tour with Hamilton - 5 hours of dance a day, and a performance of Hamilton in the evening - and the sense of pride he gained as a result of “being comfortable with letting go of your comfort zone”. Nik also opens up about the journey he has taken during the COVID pandemic which brought him back to NYU, this time as a professor. And while he acknowledges performing in Ain’t Too Proud and teaching at the same time will be a lot of work, he not only feels rewarded by his new job, but knows he is contributing to the education and growth of the next generation of theater artists.  In this episode, we talk about:  His affinity for Jeff Goldblum, and Jurassic Park (together, and separately)  His love for theme parks  Becoming a professor at NYU His joy as part of Ain’t Too Proud  Being an activist  The necessity for change within the Broadway community Connect with Nik: Listen to Little Justice, the Podcast Instagram: @nikkywalks Twitter: @nikkywalks Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
She thought theater was something she just needed to get out of her system, but many years and a successful career later this performer opens up about pursuing your dreams to avoid regret, and participating in the new virtual era theater finds itself in. No stranger to the stage, Carolee Carmello is a Broadway veteran with fourteen Broadway shows on her resume. She is a three-time Tony Award nominee and a 5-time Drama Desk nominee, winning the 1999 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actress in a Musical for her portrayal of Lucille Frank in Parade. Carolee’s other Broadway credits include the original casts of Falsettos, Lestat, The Addams Family, and Tuck Everlasting. In the last several years she received rave reviews for her role as Mrs. Lovett in the off-Broadway revival of Sweeney Todd, as well as Dolly in the US national tour of Hello, Dolly (which shutdown in March when theaters were closed). Carolee can now be seen in a fun new take on your favorite Dickens classic called Estella Scrooge: A Christmas Carol with a Twist, a virtual production that brings together casts and creatives from some of Broadway’s biggest shows.  Carolee grew up in Albany, NY, where watching movie musicals on TV as a kid was how she learned about theater. She later participated in a few community theater productions for fun while attending the University of Albany (where she majored in Business and French), never thinking she would actually make a career out of performing.  In our conversation Carolee opens up about the “combination of things” which lead to her decision to move to the city after college, and give herself a year to make things happen (Hint: There’s no people like show people). A year turned to two years, which eventually turned into an incredibly successful career performing in some of Broadway’s most iconic shows. Carolee also shares her memories of being on tour with Hello, Dolly in Buffalo, NY in March the night theaters were shut down, which led to her work on the new virtual production Estella Scrooge: A Christmas Carol with a Twist. Filmed entirely on greenscreen, alone in a room with only sticks and toilet paper rolls to act with, Carolee and the Broadway community are finding all new ways to bring theater to their audiences.  In this episode, we talk about:  The Tony Awards in the time of COVID-19 Her experience with community theater while studying business in college  Learning about Actor’s Equity for the first time  What made her decide to pursue theater Working on Estella Scrooge  The Ratatouille Musical on TikTok Connect with Carolee: Instagram: @caroleecarmello Twitter: @caroleecarmello Watch the Estella Scrooge trailer Visit the Estella Scrooge website Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
When he’s not pursuing his dreams onstage, this performer spends his spare time translating musicals like Hamilton from English to Japanese, on a mission to bridge the gap between Japanese and American musical theater audiences. Gen Parton-Shin is a Japanese-British actor who made his professional debut as Angel in the Official Japanese cast of Rent in 2008. While pursuing his dreams in the US, he furthered his career with leading roles in Japan's official Broadway productions of next to normal (Gabe), Dracula (Jonathan), Bare (Jason), and Rocky Horror Show (Rocky). Gen also played the lead role in an original Japanese musical Mitsuko ~Love Crosses All Borders~ in 2010, composed by Frank Wildhorn (Jekyll and Hyde, The Civil War). He has been a part of numerous musical/play readings in NYC, including Other World (directed by Gabriel Barr and written by Hunter Bell and Jeff Bowen of Title of Show), off-Broadway’s K-pop, and Mafatu (produced by Broadway veteran Telly Leung). He co-founded a company called Broadway in Japan, which introduced Broadway musical theatre faculty to Japanese aspiring musical theatre performers, offering invaluable education opportunities in Japan. Gen has also appeared on TV, including roles on Season 4 of Netflix's Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and The Other Two on Comedy Central. In addition, Gen has self-produced three solo cabaret shows, and in the latest one he translated and performed “My Shot” from Hamilton in Japanese. During our conversation, Gen describes his musical theater journey which has taken him from the stages of Japan, to those of New York. He shares that while performing in Japan, he wasn’t always satisfied with the translations they were given to work with; thus sparking his drive and desire to see if he could do the job himself. Gen has now translated about three fifths of Hamilton into Japanese, comparing the process to completing a puzzle which he really enjoys.  He also shares that one of his life missions is “to bridge Japan and the U.S.”, which he has begun to do with his foray into translation, hoping to make American musical theater easier for Japanese audiences to listen to and process. In this episode, we talk about:  Why he identifies as a Third Culture Kid  Completing the One-Year Conservatory program at T. Schreiber Studio on a tourist visa How he was inspired to start translating musicals into Japanese  The intricacies of translating English to Japanese  Why he thinks musical theater is so popular in Japan  Takarazuka Revue - the all female musical theater troupe in Japan Connect with Gen and watch two of his Hamilton translations: Watch Hamilton's "My Shot" Watch Hamilton's "Helpless" Check out 35mm, A Musical Exhibition IG: @GenPartonShin Twitter: @GenPartonShin Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
From The Land Down Under to The Big Apple, this singer-songwriter, pianist, writer and comedian just released his new album, Beetlejuice: The Demos! The Demos! The Demos!, and is showing other Australians that it’s possible to make the leap and find yourself working on a Broadway musical (or two). Eddie Perfect is an Australian singer-songwriter, pianist, comedian, writer and actor. He is now also a Tony Award Nominee after receiving a nomination for best original score for Beetlejuice the musical. During the same season, Eddie also wrote songs and vocal arrangements for King Kong on Broadway. Eddie is a four time nominee and two time Helpmann Award winner for his work in Australia. In 2009, his biographical musical comedy Shane Warne: The Musical won the 2009 Helpmann Award for Best New Australian Work. This production also received a Victorian Premier's Literary Award and a Green Room Award. Eddie has recorded solo albums and written and performed in numerous cabaret shows, including Songs from the Middle with the Brodsky Quartet. Following his songwriting career on Broadway, Eddie returned to Australia where he waits to star as Franklin Hart Jr. in Dolly Parton's musical 9 to 5 once the COVID-19 pandemic subsides. And most recently he released his fifth album, Beetle Juice: The demos! The demos! The demos!, a new album of demos created for his Tony-nominated score to Beetlejuice. The album also contains 17 cut songs that will be new to everyone's ears. During our conversation, Eddie candidly talks about his process for creating. He describes “kind of a weird trance I go into when I make stuff, where I really think about what it would be like to be in the audience watching it.” He focuses on what he wants an audience to think, feel, or learn in a particular moment. Reflecting on the process for Beetlejuice, Eddie shares that he wrote the opening number for the show over a 5 year period. He also recalls it was during their first previews that Beetlejuice really started building it’s cult like fan base. And it was this fanbase that served as some of the inspiration behind releasing the Beetlejuice demos in the first place. Eddie was blown away by the unique creative responses many fans of the show have had, saying he’s “never experienced anything like that.” His new demo album serves to broaden the universe of Beetlejuice a little bit “for those fans that do really riff off the work.”   In the episode, we talk about:  The intense Beetlejuice fandom  The Beetlejuice preview when they knew the show had struck a chord with people  Reading the reviews of the original 1988 film to cheer them up after their DC reviews  Australia being an importer of Broadway shows  Being in a period of his life now where he is confident with his writing and his process  Working with the cast and creatives of Beetlejuice Juggling work on Beetlejuice and King Kong simultaneously Connect with Eddie: Listen to Beetlejuice: The Demos! The Demos! The Demos! @TheEddiePerfect on Twitter @EdmundPerfect on IG Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Cheryl Hodges-Selden, Paul Seales, David Seales If you would like to see your name in this show notes or get a shout out on the pod itself, visit ttp.fm/patreon to become a member and show your support! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store