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Rachel Dratch recently had her Broadway debut in POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass Are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive, a play by Selina Fillinger. With three decades of experience in the business, Rachel recalls her SNL days where she worked for seven years and compares the pressure that came along with it and how it differs from doing Broadway. She speaks candidly about her love for comedy, particularly improv and sketch, and whether she'll ever try drama on stage or in movies. Rachel also shares why she prefers sticking to the script and rarely improvises on a film, why she decided to leave SNL, and why you should have fun when you're in a "dip". Rachel Dratch is an actress, comedian, and writer, whose latest stage credits include POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass Are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive, her Broadway debut. She was a cast member on Saturday Night Live for seven years, where she had memorable characters like Debbie Downer, Boston teen Denise, and the "Lovers" professors with Will Ferrell. She was an alumna of the Second City Theater in Chicago, where she performed in four revues on the main stage, two of which she received the Joseph Jefferson Award for Best Actress in a Revue. Some of her live comedy credits include ASSSCAT 3000 at the UCB Theater in New York, "Dratch and Fey". Her TV credits include "Frasier," "Ugly Betty," "30 Rock," "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," and "Shameless," and some of her film credits include "Wine Country," "Click," and "Just Go with It." In this episode, we talk about: Having a minor in Psychology and wanting to be a therapist Eugene O'Neill Theater Center Unexpectedly getting pregnant at 44 Living in Chicago for nine years and getting into The Second City Her memoir, Girl Walks into a Bar . . .: Comedy Calamities, Dating Disasters, and a Midlife Miracle Connect with Rachel: Twitter: @TheRealDratch Instagram: @raedratch Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
With two of his plays, Tambo & Bones and Exception to the Rule, being produced simultaneously, Dave Harris shares his chaotic but exciting schedule as he goes back and forth to LA and New York to help and make sure everything is in order on their openings. He talks about his relationship with writing and how switching from a public school to a private one influenced his writing as well as his love for theatre. He reflects on what makes theatre frustrating at times, why he chooses to write from an individual perspective, and how he uses playwriting to address his personal fears. Dave also shares why he’s happiest when he’s doing multiple projects, and why his friends’ imaginations motivate him the most. Dave Harris is a poet, performer, and playwright whose recent works include Tambo & Bones produced at Playwrights Horizons and Center Theatre Group, and Exception to the Rule which will premiere this year at Roundabout Underground. He has won numerous awards, including the 2019 Ollie Award, The Lorraine Hansberry Award, Mark Twain Award from The Kennedy Center, the 2018 Venturous Fellowship from The Lark, and a Cave Canem poetry fellowship. Other works include Summertime, his adapted film that premiered at Sundance in 2020. His first full-length poetry collection, Patricide was also recently published from Button Poetry. His work has also been seen at Actors Theatre of Louisville Humana Festival, Roundabout Underground, Manhattan Theater Club, Center Theatre Group, The Goodman, Victory Gardens, The Kennedy Center, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and many more. In this episode, we talk about: His fear of birds and how he got it Getting into the Tow Foundation Playwright Residency Program Joining the Callaloo poetry workshop Reading Stephen King at a young age Playing Elden Ring for a week straight Connect with David: Instagram: @staydancingdave Twitter: @StayDancingDave Web: staydancingdave.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2022 Tony Nominee(!!) David Morse is reprising his role for Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play How I Learned to Drive, making it's Broadway debut! David recalls his journey from loving theatre in high school to joining the Boston Repertory Company and eventually moving to New York to join the Circle Repertory Company. He also shares what made him change his mind from vowing to never do TV early in his career to becoming an established actor with a long list of TV and film credits. He opens up about how acting and playing different characters helped him get through tough times when he was younger, giving up theatre when he was struggling financially, finding the silver linings and being grateful for the way things turned out despite any shortcomings.  David has become an established actor with an incredible TV, film, stage, and acting career, boasting a long list of credits like “The Green Mile” and the Off-Broadway production of Paula Vogel's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, “How I Learned to Drive” where he won numerous awards, including an Obie Award and a Drama League Award. He appeared in over 30 productions with the Boston Repertory Company and further his stage career with the Circle Repertory Company in New York before giving TV and film a chance. Some of his other notable credits include movies like “St. Elsewhere”, “12 Monkeys”, “Contact”, “The Hurt Locker”, “Proof of Life”, “Double Vision”, and a number of TV series like “Hack”, “The Chair”, and “House”.In this episode, we talk about: In this episode, we talk about: Auditioning for the Boston Repertory Company Joining Neighborhood Playhouse to study for two years Facing bankruptcy Waking up Richard Donner in his hotel room to get a script from him Doing a one-person play Getting offered a film from Sean Penn Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A.J. shares how he had to learn Irish step dance for the new Broadway musical, Paradise Square where plays the role of Owen Duignan. He also talks about his acting career which started at a young age, from landing his first professional job for the national tour of the Sound of Music and living in New York to pursue his dreams, to moving back to Ohio after the 9/11 attacks. He also shares a fun anecdote about his years in Professional Children's School, where a girl from his math class turned out to be Scarlett Johannson. A.J. opens up about how there’s still so much to learn about America’s history despite being a history nerd himself, why Broadway feels intimate to him, and why he thinks storytelling is important to help us remember and find empathy. A.J. stars as Owen Duignan in the new musical Paradise Square which opened recently on Broadway at the Barrymore Theater. He has also been seen on Broadway in Bright Star; The Sound of Music; National Tour: Bright Star; La Cage aux Folles, and more. Some of his other Off-Broadway/stage credits include February House (The Public); Brigadoon (Irish Rep); The Suitcase Under the Bed (Mint); Unlock’d (Prospect); A Contemporary American’s Guide to a Successful Marriage (Cherry Lane); Things To Ruin (Second Stage). He was also recently seen in television shows, including CBS's “Bull” as Jerry McConnell and HBO Max's “Julia” as Chef André Soltner. A.J.’s Film and TV credits also include “Hunters”, “The Blacklist”, “Madam Secretary”, “Younger”, and “Homeland”. In this episode, we talk about: Being on tour with The Sound of Music when he was 12 years old Attending the Professional Children’s School Living in New York when 9/11 happened Getting the role of Jean-Michel for La Cage aux Folles right after he graduated Watching Douglas Hodge's Tony-winning performance every night for a year Connect with A.J.: Instagram: @aj_shively Web: ajshively.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Alyssa May Gold recently made her Broadway debut alongside Mary-Louise Parker and David Morse in the long-anticipated Broadway premiere of How I Learned To Drive. She was previously seen in WP Theater/Second Stage’s acclaimed world premiere of Our Dear Dead Drug Lord, and other New York credits include Arcadia (Broadway), Juliet + Romeo, Julius Caesar, The Maid’s Tragedy (Pocket Universe), Middle of the Night, Lemon Sky (Keen Company), and Brilliant Traces (Art of Warr). Alyssa’s Film and TV credits include “Rebel in the Rye,” “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood,” “Taking Woodstock,”and “Law &Order: SVU.” She is also the founder of Pocket Universe, a theater/film production company dedicated to reconsidering and re-imagining classic stories and conventions.  Upon being asked how she first became involved in theater, Alyssa recalls seeing the Annie movie when she was four years old, and says she hasn’t stopped since. She talks about the inspiration and creation of her production company, Pocket Universe, revealing the meaning behind its title and how it relates to string theory. Alyssa also opens up about the great responsibility she feels to the audience as part of How I Learned To Drive, saying the play “is putting a handout to the people who need to be pulled up through hell back to Earth” – “…that's why there are doctors who do heart surgery, and then there are actors who work on your heart.” In this episode, we talk about: Why she considers this her actual Broadway debut  Playing in the World Series of Poker in Vegas   Her love for science and metaphysical discussions Playing the oldest and the youngest woman in the story, and what makes her track beautiful Why Mama Mia is one of her favorite musicals of all time  Listening to the things that light your heart on fire Connect with Alyssa: IG: @heylyssamay Web: alyssamaygold.com Pocket Universe Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Actor Simon Bailey hails from London, where his career on the West End is booming. He trained at the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain, and his West End credits include Heathers: The Musical, Jersey Boys (Tommy DeVito), The Phantom of the Opera (Raoul), Enjolras in the 21st Anniversary cast of Les Miserables, I Can’t Sing! The X-Factor Musical, Romeo and Juliet -The Musical, Pharaoh in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, We Will Rock You, and more. SImon can be seen now in the West End production of Moulin Rouge as The Duke at the Piccadilly Theatre. Simon reminisces about his experience as part of the original workshop for Heathers: The Musical in London, and shares why it holds such a big place in his heart. He opens up about landing the role of The Duke, why he’s had so much fun building and developing a darker character, and also talks about why he particularly loves the first 10 minutes of the show when he’s able “to look out and see everybody… just completely entranced in this thing.” Simon also reflects on working as an understudy, and why he feels it’s such an important ground to start from and build on.  In this episode, we talk about:  The community working on the West End  Attending the National Youth Theatre, and bypassing drama school  Why being an actor now is very different than it was pre-2020 His experience as a swing in We Will Rock You  Creative freedom from Alex Timbers Connect with Simon: IG: @simonbailey1210 Twitter: @SimonBailey1210 Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Michael Maliakel recently made his Broadway debut, following Broadway’s reopening, starring in the title role of Aladdin at the New Amsterdam Theatre. Additional credits include the National Tour of The Phantom of the Opera (Raoul u/s), Anything Can Happen: The Songs of Maury Yeston, Mira Nair’s Monsoon Wedding (Berkeley Rep), and She Loves Me (PlayMakers Rep). You may have also seen Michael on TV in Bull, and FBI.  As a first generation Indian American, Michael reflects on what he calls his “unexpected journey” to a career in the performing arts, including how his love for music brought him to the Peabody Conservatory to earn a degree in opera. He speaks candidly about representation in the industry, noting that as a child he had no real role models or examples for what his performing arts career could be, but trusted his gut and the way music made him feel alive in order to create space for himself and others like him. Michael also opens up about making his Broadway debut as the title character in a hit Disney musical, including the whirlwind audition process which began in the midst of the COVID shutdown, and the “full goosebumps” moment of his first curtain call as Aladdin.  In this episode, we talk about:  Attending the American Boychoir School in Princeton Using his facebook profile picture as his headshot at an open call  The interactive and collaborative experience of choral singing, and theater  Touring with Phantom of the Opera as the Raoul understudy  His love for Broadway’s Spring Awakening, and Bridges of Madison County Connect with Michael: IG @michaelmaliakel Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Combined across the Emmys, Grammys, Olivier and Tony Awards, Patt LuPone has 14 nominations and six wins. Her resume includes 27 Broadway credits, including Eva Perón in the original Broadway production of Evita (1st Tony Award), Anything Goes, Sweeney Todd, Noises Off, Rose in the 2008 Broadway revival of Gypsy (2nd Tony Award), Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, War Paint, Working, Oliver!, The Robber Bridegroom, and The Beggar’s Opera. In London she starred in the original casts of Les Misérables, The Cradle Will Rock, Sunset Boulevard, and the West End revival of Company. She also has a long and illustrious career across TV and film, with credits including Driving Miss Daisy, Frasier, Will and Grace, Ugly Betty, 30 Rock, Glee, American Horror Story, Girls, Penny Dreadful, and of course, Life Goes On. She's a voiceover artist, a cabaret performer, a mom, and performs regularly with the New York Philharmonic, all of which mean you can find her singing across 22 different albums. Patti LuPone was the first American to ever win an Olivier Award, has been inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame, and can now be seen on Broadway in the revival of Company.  LuPone recalls her first introduction to the musical Gypsy (playing Louise) in high school, speaking candidly about not understanding the play at the time, and shares how she was initially banned from participating in any of Arthur Laurents work before going on to win a Tony Award for playing Rose. She reflects on going to the “dark side” a lot when COVID shut the industry down, noting it wasn’t that she couldn’t perform but rather that she had nothing to fill that void with, and shares how close-knit and supportive the cast and crew of Company is as a result of the collective trauma and uncertainty they faced together once they resumed rehearsals. LuPone also speaks about the importance of doing her work completely in the rehearsal room, allowing her and the audience to both play and relax once she is onstage, and shares why she looks at the audience every single night.  In this episode, we talk about:  Being in one of the first-ever students in Juilliard’s school of drama in the 70’s  Her Marilyn Monroe impression at 3 years old  What it is about laughter from an audience that brings her joy  What she calls the “Italian blast”, and not having a filter  Her “Andrew Lloyd Webber memorial pool” Resenting producers or anybody that underestimates the audience's intelligence Connect with Patti: Twitter: @pattilupone IG: @pattilupone Web: pattilupone.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Reeve Carney is an actor, singer-songwriter, and musician, who may be best known for originating the role of Peter Parker/Spider-Man in Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark on Broadway, and playing Orpheus in the original Broadway cast of the Tony Award-winning musical Hadestown. Other notable roles include his portrayal of Dorian Gray in the Showtime series Penny Dreadful, and Riff Raff in the Fox musical television film The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let's Do the Time Warp Again. Reeve is also the lead singer and songwriter of the band Carney, also consisting of his brother Zane, Aiden Moore, and Jon Epcar, who together have toured with The Veronicas, and opened for Arcade Fire and U2. He recently appeared as Tom Ford in the Oscar nominated film House of Gucci, and can currently be seen performing his original music in his residency at The Green Room 42, or captivating audiences eight times a week as Orpheus in Hadestown on Broadway. Reeve chronicles his almost 27 year guitar playing journey, which began at age 12 and led to playing in nightclubs in LA a few years later, where fellow musicians convinced him if he ever wanted to lead a band, he needed to learn how to sing. He recalls meeting Julie Taymor for the first time at one of his band’s shows, and how that meeting set the course for working with Bono and The Edge, and originating the role of Peter Parker/Spider-Man on Broadway. Reeve also shares how he became involved with Hadestown, how the character of Orpheus changed significantly between their run at the National Theatre in London and the Broadway opening, and why he said “no” when asked to be a part of the first reading in 2012.  In this episode, we talk about:  Growing up in a family of artists  Being mistaken for Macaulay Culkin Getting signed to Interscope Records when he was 22  His electronic effects pedal company called Quarantine Effects USA How Orepheus’s purity of voice is reflected in his character  Connect with Reeve: Check out his Effects Pedal company: https://quarantineeffectsusa.com/ IG: @reevecarney Twitter: @reevecarney Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Trigger warning: This episode contains discussion of eating disorders. At the age of 25, Eva Noblezada is a two time Tony Award nominee, a Grammy Award winner, and a WhatsOnStage Award winning actress and singer. She starred as Kim in Cameron Mackintosh’s London revival of Miss Saigon when she was 17 years old, and shortly after played Eponine in the West End revival of Les Misérables. Eva later reprised her performance as Kim in the first Broadway revival of Miss Saigon (also her Broadway debut). In 2019, she made her film debut in Yellow Rose starring alongside Lea Salonga, who originated the role of Kim in Miss Saigon. Eva originated the role of Eurydice in Hadestown on Broadway, and it's in Hadestown where she continues to lead, and take audiences “way down under the ground”.  Eva speaks candidly about her past toxic relationship with the word “perfect”, how it affected her life as a 17 year old all on her own abroad, leading Cameron Mackintosh’s London revival of Miss Saigon, and why she felt like she was “falling for years”. She opens up about living with anxiety, panic attacks, and body dysmorphia, and how she’s learned to come back to herself at those times, and ask the important questions - “Are we in danger? - We're okay”. Talking about Hadestown, Eva shares her thoughts on Eurydice (and playing Eurydice), and her love for the “extra layer of consciousness” that can be seen throughout the whole show.  In this episode, we talk about:  Growing up Filipino Mexican, and discovering musical theater  A strong work ethic, instilled by her father  The mental and physical toll of an 8 show schedule  Meeting Tara Rubin at the Jimmy Awards Pole dancing as fitness, and how society sexualizes women  Her “all or nothing” way of life  Connect with Eva: IG: @livevamaria Twitter: @EvaNoblezada Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Telly and Cameron discuss the inspiration behind the documentary Ensemble, the catharsis of filming it, and ​​the resilience of the 13 very diverse people in different stages of their life and career who are featured on screen. They share thoughts on George Takei’s legacy as an artist, activist and producer, and how his career encouraged and cleared a path for so many after him. Telly and Cameron express their support of “call out culture” in order to take time for yourself physically and mentally, and reflect on the old adage “the show must go on”. They also open up about what they hope people walk away with after watching their new documentary, Ensemble which dropped on March 11th on Broadway On Demand. Telly, as the producer, and Cameron, as a featured performer, are part of this brand new documentary, which gives an inside look at the private lives of Broadway ensemble members a year after Broadway shut down.  Telly Leung made his Broadway debut in the 2002 revival of Flower Drum Song, and was named one of 12 Faces to Watch in 2012: Dance, Theater, Architecture, and Art by the Los Angeles Times. He boasts an extensive resume on both stage and screen, and other notable roles include Aladdin in Aladdin on Broadway, the Broadway revival and national tour of Rent, Godspell, The Secret Garden, and In Transit.  Cameron Adams has over a dozen Broadway credits on her resume after making her Broadway debut in the 2000 revival of The Music Man, and she will return to Broadway and her role in Mrs. Doubtfire when the show re-opens for the second time post COVID.  In this episode, we talk about:  COVID compliance while shooting a documentary  Looking back and seeing how far you’ve come  Diversifying the power structures of broadway  The mythology of Broadway  The necessity of becoming a “multi-hyphenate artist”  Connect with Telly and Cameron: Watch Ensemble on Broadway On Demand IG: @tellyleung & @cameron.nyc Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
What makes the heart, soul, and sound of Hermes? Ask three different Hermes u/s and get three different answers. That speaks to the brilliance of the Hadestown creative team, and their encouragement to anyone who steps into the winged shoes of Hermes to bring their actual selves to the role. With us in this episode are T. Oliver Reid, Trent Saunders, and Eddie Rodriguez (two Broadway and the national tour understudies respectively), three uniquely different individuals who are all joined together in their privilege of being to play Hermes, the messenger.  Eddie Noel Rodríguez (Swing, u/s Hermes) is a proud Puerto Rican performer who has lived and worked as a professional artist since he was 14 years old, starting with the folkloric dance company Gíbaro de Puerto Rico traveling the world representing his culture. He has a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Universidad del Sagrado Corazón with a specialty in telecommunications and theater. He’s collaborating with different Broadway artists to bring musical theater workshops to the artists living in Puerto Rico. Eddie is thrilled, honored and grateful to be in his second national tour with the family of Hadestown. Tour: On Your Feet! (Emilio). Regional: Godspell (Jeffrey), Man of la Mancha (Dr. Carrasco), La Cage Aux Folles (Hanna), Footloose (Willard), Rent (u/s Roger), Piaf (Ensemble), Hair (Ensemble). T. Oliver Reid (Swing, u/s Hermes, u/s Hades) Broadway show #13 for this award-winning artist. Broadway: Kiss Me, Kate; Follies; Thoroughly Modern Millie; Never Gonna Dance; La Cage Aux Folles; Chicago; The Wedding Singer; Mary Poppins; Sister Act; After Midnight; Sunset Boulevard; Once on This Island. TV/Film: The Sixth Reel, “Sex & The City,” “The Blacklist.” Educator Trent Saunders (Worker, u/s Orpheus, u/s Hermes) is grateful for the chance, joining this incredible company. He has been building some exciting things with his cohort and family of collaborators, The Saunders Collective (thesaunderscollective.com). Favorite credits: Evita (Che), Aladdin (OBC), American Idiot (St. Jimmy). Love to Tree, the Delfinitas, Mike, the family and all of you. Let’s tell the story! In this episode, we talk about: How majoring in telecommunications helped Eddie make it to Broadway Why their unique differences help unify them in the role of Hermes The stress of the vocal ranges required for covering multiple tracks How do get over that "I HAVE TO PEE!" feeling before going on stage Representation of 3 different guys being the same character Connect with Trent, T., and Eddie: IG: @eddienoelr, @toliverreid & @trensaun @nyugradacting @columbiamfaacting @ridermusicaltheatre Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A professional percussionist, Mauro Refosco has performed and recorded with artists such as David Byrne, The Red Hot Chili Peppers and Thom Yorke’s Atoms for Peace. After beginning his touring career in 1994 as Byrne’s percussionist, he returned to NYC and joined cult creative ensemble The Lounge Lizards, playing experimental punk jazz. He formed his own band, Forro in the Dark, which has recorded four full-length albums and performed at major domestic and international festivals. He’s also composed music and soundtracks for movies, television, fashion shows and Off-Broadway plays. You can now find him walking around barefoot, on Broadway, in American Utopia Born in Brazil, he found his way to NYC and ultimately the professional touring world of music. His career exploded alongside other music legends. Once he began to embrace what makes him unique and different, he found his tribe after a short stint bring a NYC-based street performer in Central Park and in the subway. He found his way to an audition for David Bryne, which resulted in an interview(!). The rest, as they say, is history.  In this episode, we talk about: How his love for soccer led to his professional career as a percussionist  How the album “American Utopia” made its way to Broadway as a show The difference a percussion player and a drum player Why Ted Lasso is the greatest show ever Being a NYC busker Why he decided to stop singing backing vocals for David Byrne Connect with Mauro: IG: @MauroRefosco Web: MauroRefosco.com Listen to Jomoro (and Blue Marble Sky) Get tickets for American Utopia on Broadway Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Malcolm Armwood made his Broadway debut as a swing in Hadestown, and can currently be seen playing one of the workers. He previously starred in the national tours of Motown: The Musical and Smokey Joe’s Cafe, and other credits include Grease, Ragtime, Hairspray, and Showboat. Kay Trinidad is part of the original Broadway cast of Hadestown, and has continued her role as one of the Fates since Broadway’s reopening. Kay made her Broadway debut in the original cast of The Little Mermaid, and additional credits include the world premiere of Lempicka (Williamstown Theatre Festival), the New York Premiere of BARE: A Pop Opera, Children of Eden in concert at The Kennedy Center, The King and I, and Beauty and The Beast.  Not only do Kay and Malcolm have a Broadway show in common, they reveal both performing as kids at home in front of their families, and recall memories of each of their early interests in the performing arts. Chatting about the heightened importance of theatre and the arts in the midst of a pandemic, Kay and Malcolm share their thoughts on what they find so compelling about Hadestown, and storytelling in general. They also chat about working with the “powerhouse” creative team behind Hadestown, including the collaboration between cast and crew that went into creating the final product.  In this episode, we talk about:  Singing in front of crowds  Why they’ve stuck with Hadestown Missing post-performance stage door visits during COVID  Their favorite moments of the show  Call out culture, and self care Connect with Kay and Malcolm IG: @kaytrinidadkarns & @marmwood214 Twitter: @kaytrinidad1 And get your tickets to Hadestown! Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Tara Jackson and Sayo Oni, both triple threats, recently made their Broadway debuts in Hadestown. Originally from Canada, Tara Jackson was previously part of the Hadestown Canadian premiere, and is now assistant dance captain, a swing, and an understudy for The Fates in Hadestown on Broadway. Sayo Oni recently completed his junior fall semester at Elon University, and can now be seen in Hadestown as a swing and an understudy for Orpheus.  Tara (who covers 8 tracks) and Sayo (who covers 6 tracks) chat about their experiences as swings and understudies - the unpredictability, the excitement, and the documents they both created to keep all their tracks mapped out. They recall what they were doing professionally when COVID shut the industry down, Tara with a flight booked to join the Broadway cast, and Sayo in his freshman year of college, and share how it affected their lives and careers. Tara and Sayo also take us back to when they were first bitten by the theater bug, and how they found their way to Broadway.  In this episode, we talk about:  Joining the Broadway cast of Hadestown  Learning choreography by osmosis  Finding theater in high school and college  Forming a dentist voice lesson company  Family reactions to their career choice  Connect with Tara and Sayo: IG: @taraatee && @sayo.oni Twitter: @taraatee && And get your tickets to Hadestown! Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Alysia Reiner and David Alan Basche are a power couple of TV, film and theater. Alysia may be best known for playing Natalie “Fig” Figueroa, a warden on Orange is the New Black, and has a plethora of additional credits including Better Things, The Deuce, Masters of Sex, How to Get Away with Murder, 30 Rock and the upcoming production of Mrs. Marvel. David may be best known for his five seasons starring in the TV Land original series The Exes, and for his portrayal of Todd Beamer in the film United 93. His own string of credits includes Royal Pains, Blind Spot, Frasier, 30 Rock and Lipstick Jungle. Alysia and David are co-producers, co-creators, and co stars, who can now be heard in the podcast original Around The Sun.  As collaborators, Alysia and David share how they decide which projects to work on together behind the camera, as well as their experiences working together on camera. They dive into the realities of living with a fellow actor and artist, including how they balance their careers, handle jealousy or envy, and how they curb self-doubt. And as actors who have to engage in intimate scenes with others, Alysia and David also share their philosophies on the importance of trust as a couple, and thoughts on the dichotomy of being actors whose job it is to “get caught up in what’s not real” for a role, but also acknowledging that it’s a lie. In this episode, we talk about:  Meeting during a summer stock production of Twelfth Night  Love for voiceover work  Self-taping auditions for each other  The process of letting your character go at the end of the day  Working on Around the Sun Connect with Alysia and David: Listen to Around the Sun (episode 105 here) IG: @alysiareiner && @davidalanbasche Web: socialenterprisegiftguide.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Join me live on the red carpet for the opening night of The Music Man! In this episode we hear from Hugh Jackman, Sutton Foster, Jerry Zaks, Warren Carlyle, Jayne Howdyshell, Jefferson Mays, Daniel Patrick Russell, Drew Minard, Eloise Kropp, Kammie Crum, Marie Mullen, Jordan Beall, Maria Briggs, Phillip Boykin, Ronnie S Bowman, Sherisse Springer, Garrett Long, and Lance Roberts. There are even special cameos from Seth Meyers and Randy Rainbow. #justsayin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Robert Schneider is one of Feinstein's/54 Below original programming producers, a freelance director, and co-host of the popular podcast Behind the Curtain: Broadway's Living Legends, the official podcast of BroadwayWorld. Some of his favorite directing credits include Memphis (Regional Premiere), Rock of Ages (Millbrook Playhouse), The Last Five Years (Fuse Productions), Good People with Tony Award winner Johanna Day, and City of Angels (Young Artists Ensemble). Robert is also the Artistic Director for the J2 Spotlight Musical Theater Company, which just began its second season. Robert is currently on the faculty of both Penn State University and the New York Film Academy, and has a new book coming out on March 31st, called Fifty Key Stage Musicals, now available for pre-order.  Robert shares how the J2 Spotlight Musical Theater Company was born through connections fostered while working at 54 Below, and recalls memories of the day the pandemic shut them down. He talks about the wisdom accrued and lessons learned from his guests as one of the co-hosts of one of the industry’s favorite Broadway podcasts, one of the most noteworthy being the validation that there really is no security in this business for anyone. Robert also gives us an inside look to his new book, Fifty Key Stage Musicals, including how they decided which shows to include, and what kind of healthy debate he hopes it inspires.  In this episode, we talk about:  How musical theater has always been in his DNA His dad, the private investigator  A common consensus on Danny Kaye  Why he hopes to see an end to open call auditions  What types of show’s he thinks we’ll see more of in the future  Connect with Rob IG: @robwschneider IG: @j2spotlightnyc Listen to his podcast BEHIND THE CURTAIN Check out J2 Spotlight Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Lynn Nottage is a two time Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, and the first and only woman to win the category twice, for “Ruined” and “Sweat”. She's a screenwriter, a Tony nominee, a producer, the recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant fellowship and was included in Time magazine's 2019 list of the 100 Most Influential People. Lynn’s work can currently be found on 2 different Broadway stages: “Intimate Apparel” the opera at Lincoln Center Theater (Libretto), and “MJ” a new Broadway musical at the Neil Simon Theater (Libretto). She's an activist working with the Art for Justice Fund, among others, and is an associate professor of playwriting at Columbia University.  Lynn opens up about one of her main reasons for going into teaching, noting the importance of nurturing and mentorships, and being invested in the success of her students, particularly her students of color. She talks about getting involved with the Art for Justice Fund specially through her play “Clyde’s”, a not for profit invested in how art can be used to help people who are incarcerated or formerly incarcerated tell their stories and “transcend their circumstances”. Lynn also chats about one of her newest projects, the new opera “Intimate Apparel”, and why it’s considered a brand new show rather than a revival. In this episode, we talk about:  Almost becoming a journalist instead of a playwright  Researching and conducting interviews for her plays  Creating Broadway industry internships through the Art for Justice Fund  Reimagining her great grandmother's life to write Intimate Apparel  Working on MJ the Musical Connect with Lynn Twitter: @Lynnbrooklyn IG: @lynnnottage Web: http://www.lynnnottage.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Lorin Latarro is a director and choreographer, who also has fourteen Broadway credits to her name as a performer, including Twyla Tharp’s Movin’ Out, Fosse, Swing!, Kiss Me Kate, A Chorus Line, Spamalot and Man Of La Mancha. She choreographed Broadway’s Mrs. Doubtfire, Waitress, Les Liasons Dangereuse, Waiting For Godot with Sir Ian McKellen and Sir Patrick Stuart, Merrily We Roll Along for Roundabout, La Traviata at The Met Opera, and was the Associate Choreographer for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and American Idiot. Her choreography has also been seen at The Public Theater, The Kennedy Center, Brooklyn Academy of Music, City Center Encores!, and the Old Globe. Lorin is a Drama Desk, Lucille Lortel, and Chita Rivera Award nominee, and recently directed Candace Bushnell’s one woman show, Is There Still Sex In The City, which became a NYTimes Critic’s Pick.  Lorin dives right into a conversation about her love for neuroscience and how it relates to the body (specifically dance), her obsession with the idea of how a collective experience (like watching live theatre) changes your brainwaves, and why she almost left the entertainment industry to create her own business. She opens up about why choreographing and directing suit her more than performing, and talks about her road to becoming a successful choreographer. Lorin also speaks about working on her newest Broadway show, Mrs. Doubtfire - how and why she integrated many different styles of dance, and how she carried out her vision.  In this episode, we talk about:  Deciding she was going to be a dancer at 4 years old  Being married to a brain surgeon  Studying dance at Julliard  Her upcoming projects: Almost Famous, and The Outsiders Founding ArtAmmmo.org - Artists Against Gun Violence Connect with Lorin Twitter: @lorinlatarro IG: @latarro https://mrsdoubtfirebroadway.com/ Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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