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The Wild

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Chris Morgan takes listeners around the world to Italy, Germany and his own  backyard of the Pacific Northwest to explore the beauty and wonder of the outdoors and its inhabitants. From beavers to wolves to grizzly bears we experience up close the resilient power of nature and our relationship with it.
27 Episodes
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The Wildlife Superdog

The Wildlife Superdog

2020-03-1731:422

Consider supporting The Wild by making a financial gift. Find out more information at our donation page. Karelian Bear Dogs were bred in Finland hundreds of years ago for hunting everything from bears to moose. Now, ironically, they are being used to save bears and other species. In some remote parts of the country grizzly bears have been known to wander into town, presenting a danger of encounters with humans. These Karelian Bear Dogs are being used to scare bears away and prevent future returns. We'll head to Montana to talk to the woman whose brainchild it was to bring this breed to North America to help with wildlife research, poaching, search and rescue, reducing conflict between humans and big wild animals.
The Secret Life of Trees

The Secret Life of Trees

2020-03-1025:441

Consider supporting The Wild by making a financial gift. Find out more information at our donation page. When you walk through a forest and enjoy the beauty of the trees towering above, there is a giant social network pulsing just below your feet. Underneath the surface lives an extensive network of roots that trees use to communicate with one another, share nutrients to other sick and struggling trees and even alert fellow trees of danger. In this episode I’ll dive deep into the secret world below the forest floor and learn about the largest communications network in the world: the wood wide web.
Consider supporting The Wild by making a financial gift. Find out more information at our donation page. As our society moved from the Industrial Revolution to the Information Age we now live in a time of constant interruption. In spite of social media and advances in communications, studies have shown that our society is becoming more lonely than in previous generations. It is something author Richard Louv calls “species loneliness” in his book Our Wild Calling. In this episode I talk with Richard about the transformative powers of connecting with animals and how these bonds can benefit our mental, physical and spiritual health.
Consider supporting The Wild by making a financial gift. Find out more information on our donation page. When the Elwha dam was completed in 1913, it brought hydroelectricity and economic progress to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state at a steep environmental cost: destroying ancient salmon runs and the historic fisheries of Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. Five years after two dams on the Elwha were removed, something extraordinary happened: The ecosystem began to repair itself - rewilding itself before our very eyes.
Return to Svalbard

Return to Svalbard

2020-02-1830:012

Considering supporting The Wild by making a financial gift. Find out more information on our donation page. This summer, I returned to the remote Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, famous for polar bears, walruses and migratory birds. It’s been 13 years since I’ve last visited the islands and I’m excited - but apprehensive - about what I might find. We’ll explore how this delicate arctic ecosystem works and the future of this beautiful corner of the north.
Season 2 Preview

Season 2 Preview

2020-01-2803:29

Ecologist and award-winning filmmaker Chris Morgan kicks off Season 2 with more adventures in the wild. He takes listeners across the Pacific Northwest and around the world to explore wildlife, the complex web of ecosystems they inhabit, and the colorful human characters that know these places and species best.
Filmmakers Jeff Wilson and Mark Smith spent four months in a tiny shack in the Antarctic documenting a colony of 500,000 Adelie penguins. They endured 130 mile hour winds, sub-zero temperatures and penguin poop…lots of penguin poop. This is an uncut version of Chris’ interview with Jeff and Mark as they share their experiences of documenting penguins for their two films for the BBC’s Frozen Planet and Disneynature’s Penguins.
What does the smell of motor oil, vanilla ice cream, and parachutes have in common? A little aquatic rodent known as the beaver. We are hard at work on season 2 of The Wild. But in the meantime, we thought we’d share an earlier interview that we did for our beaver episode. In that episode Chris spoke to Ben Goldfarb. Ben is a great journalist and he loves beavers. He wrote a book called Eager: The surprising, secret lives of beavers and why they matter. In that earlier episode we only used a small portion of what Ben told us about beavers. So we thought it would be fun to share the  full interview. If you still haven’t gotten enough of your beaver fix you might want to check out our Facebook live Wild Bookclub interview with Ben Goldfarb here.
If you are enjoying The Wild and want us to keep on making more episodes, we could really use your help. Please take a few minutes to fill out our listener survey. We’d love to get your thoughts. Thanks! A lot of time we go to nature to find silence, to find solace. But what is silence really? You might think you’re in a quiet place, but it is hard to find complete natural silence with no human noise pollution. In this episode, Chris hits the road with sound engineers Gordon Hempton and Matt Mikkelsen on a mission to find the quietest place on earth. You can learn more about Matt and Gordon’s work [here](http:// https://www.quietparks.org/partners.).
Waiting for Penguins

Waiting for Penguins

2019-06-1131:322

If you are enjoying The Wild and want us to keep on making more episodes, we could really use your help. Please take a few minutes to fill out our listener survey. We’d love to get your thoughts. Thanks! Filmmakers Jeff Wilson and Mark Smith spent four months in a tiny shack in the Antarctic documenting a colony of 500,000 Adelie penguins. They endured 130 mile hour winds, sub-zero temperatures and penguin poop…lots of penguin poop. Jeff and Mark documented penguins in two films, one for the BBC’s Frozen Planet and the other in Disneynature’s Penguins.
Learn how you can support The Wild and can get early access to new episodes and bonus content by going to our donation page. In the 1800’s over 10 million salmon would return to the Columbia River that borders Washington and Oregon. Today that number is closer to two million. Many factors account for this change including lower water quality, a warmer climate and sea lions. Hundreds of sea lions gather at the base of the Bonneville Dam eating salmon that are trying to make their way up river to spawn. Humans are going to great lengths to scare off the sea lions in hopes of preserving the salmon run. Chris examines the tensions between man and animal, telling the story from the point of view of the sea lion.
Learn how you can support The Wild and can get early access to new episodes and bonus content by going to our donation page. Two hundred years ago grizzly bears roamed the North Cascades, but today there are less than twenty, maybe even just one or two. No one really knows for sure since they are so hard to find. That is why they are known as ‘ghost bears.’ But today there is a movement to bring them back. Many people love the idea, others hate it. Chris looks at the challenges of bringing grizzlies back to northeast Washington and what has fueled his life long love of bears.
Learn how you can support The Wild and can get early access to new episodes and bonus content by going to our donation page. Nature can lower your blood pressure, reduce depression and may even help fight cancer. Chris takes a walk in woods with forest therapist Julie Hepp and learns about the powers of nature. He also chats with author Florence Williams who has written extensively about the health benefits of forests and research being conducted in this growing field of study.
Learn how you can support The Wild and can get early access to new episodes and bonus content by going to our donation page. Italy’s Lazio e Molise National Park, just two hours outside of Rome, has an incredible variety of wildlife: wolves, boar, red deer, roe deer, goat-antelope. It’s also home to about 50 European brown bears, the smaller cousins of the grizzly, and the world’s rarest subspecies of brown bear. Chris meets up with the “Italian Chris Morgan” for a tour of this island of wilderness.
Learn how you can support The Wild and can get early access to new episodes and bonus content by going to our donation page. When you’re outside hiking or camping and you encounter an animal, it’s important to understand what’s going on from the animal’s perspective. On today’s episode Chris will share people’s real life interactions with animals and discuss what they did right and what they should have done differently. Here are links to the videos discussed on the episode capturing people’s surprising encounters with other creatures: Brown bear encounter Hiking with bears Mountain biker meets mountain lion Sea lion drags girl off dock Gorillas in Uganda
No one had filmed Siberian tigers before Sooyong Park. There are only about 500 of the big cats left in the wildest part of eastern Russia. On this episode, Chris Morgan will take us to Siberia with Park and show the dedication needed to catch a glimpse at the rarest tiger in the world. To learn how you can listen to The Wild episodes in advance and bonus material trek on over to our website.
On this episode we'll learn how the mighty beaver has reshaped the landscape of America, had a role in politics and may help us adapt to climate change. To learn how you can listen to The Wild episodes in advance and bonus material trek on over to our website.
Wars and man have pushed wolves out of Germany since the early 1900s but in 2000 they started coming back. In a process called rewilding wolves increasing in number, finding refuge among the dilapidated military bases strewn across the German countryside.
How to Catch a Grizzly

How to Catch a Grizzly

2019-04-0918:0912

On a research trip in the Canadian Rockies Chris helps a biologist friend capture and release a grizzly. This was part of a research program to better understand what grizzlies need to survive by tracking their health, movements and mating habits.
A cougar biologist with Washington state once received a complaint. An old lady called him up and said, “There’s a cougar in my backyard.” And the biologist responded, “Well, that’s funny because I got a call this morning from a cougar. He told me there’s an old lady in his frontyard!” Our backyards are getting bigger. And the cougar’s front yard is getting smaller. This episode, we search out some of these big cats to understand the impact cougars and humans have on each other.
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Comments (12)

Dustin Dorsey

love this

Feb 24th
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Francisco Benavides Jr.

Love this podcast!!

Jul 19th
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Ryan Edwards

The Wild is incredible. I've listened to every episode at least twice.

Jul 11th
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Samgames10

Best Podcast EVER, I love everything about it. Super educational

Jul 9th
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Dario Petranović

Thank you for share this with us. You make me cry and laugh in this 20min podcast. Keep going. 💪

Jul 7th
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Bahareh

Omg! It was one of the best. I personally love the episodes like this one (and the forest therapist and the animal psychology episodes) which are talked about a concept in nature more than ones which are about one particular animal. For me, this one and the others like this works like both a meditation and educational session. I shared your podcast anywhere on social media for all my friends who love nature. Thanks for being so inspiring.💚

Jun 28th
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Maggie

So far this has been, in my opinion, the best episode. It is beautiful and magical! As someone who- due to medical issues- losing their he as ring, this episode made me cry...

Jun 18th
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Moira Manley

Love this. So happy I found this podcast.

Jun 18th
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Traci Bratton

this is my favorite podcast! it's hard to wait for the next episode to air.

Jun 11th
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Maggie

I've been on forest therapy walks and they are wonderful. However, I really didnt care for this "therapist". I think she was just nervous because she was being filmed, but to be honest she sounded like she didn't know what she was talking about.

May 28th
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Shane Marten

This is by far one of the greatest podcasts out there! I'm blown away by the details and up close sounds! I'm hooked from start to finish. Brilliant!

May 27th
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Bahareh

Omg! That last howl! Such a beautiful sound!

May 17th
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