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Author: Goop, Inc. and Cadence13

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Gwyneth Paltrow and goop's Chief Content Officer Elise Loehnen chat with leading thinkers, culture changers, and industry disruptors—from doctors to creatives, CEOs to spiritual healers—about shifting old paradigms and starting new conversations.

153 Episodes
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“I felt empty and alone,” says Demi Moore, “but oddly not lonely.” The actor and author of the new memoir Inside Out joins GP to talk about what happened after the things she had been hiding from “came spilling out.” Moore describes the process of becoming vulnerable and learning to identify the misperceptions we hold against ourselves and others. One of the biggest traps, says Moore, is needing to place blame. This can keep us from accountability, from forgiveness, from moving on. There is so much meaning to be found in our lives when we back away from binary thinking and allow ourselves to feel compassion for how complex we all are. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
The Principles We Live By

The Principles We Live By

2019-12-0300:53:321

“How are you going to live your life in a way that is kind, and loving, and honest, and with integrity?” asks Sarah Hurwitz, former speechwriter for Michelle and Barack Obama and author of Here All Along. In her new book, Hurwitz rediscovered Judaism for herself, and today she shares some of the principles and traditions that could help anyone to create a more fulfilling life. She talks about different ways to feel spiritual, what it really means to tell the truth, and what she’s learned about gossiping. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
GP met functional medicine practitioner Alejandro Junger in 2007, and her journey into wellness was forever changed because of it. Junger, who founded the twenty-one-day Clean Program and wrote the bestselling book Clean, has a new seven-day detox protocol and accompanying book, Clean 7. And now he’s sitting down with GP to share what he’s learned about detoxification, intermittent fasting, and maneuvering around the modern inventions that tend to disrupt our body’s digestive processes and overall health. “We’re living in this interesting point in time where people want agency over their health,” says GP. Junger is the one of the healers helping us to make the most of it. (For more on Junger, listen to his goopfellas podcast episode on the roots of inflammation and head to The goop Podcast hub.)
Processing Our Childhood

Processing Our Childhood

2019-11-2600:53:393

“You don’t want to live on someone else’s fumes,” says Lisa Brennan-Jobs, author of Small Fry, abestselling memoir about growing up in Silicon Valley as the daughter of artist Chrisann Brennan and Apple legend Steve Jobs. Today, Brennan-Jobs and Elise Loehnen talk about the complicated feelings that often arise when we look back at our past—and about how we can sit with and process those feelings. They talk about learning to see our parents—and any human—as human, as multidimensional, as both good and flawed. “It’s hard for people to live their value system sometimes,” says Brennan-Jobs. But that doesn’t erase all the moments when they do. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
Finding Joy Again

Finding Joy Again

2019-11-2100:54:065

“When you put on your clothes, how do you feel?” asks Ingrid Fetell Lee, designer and author of the brilliantly researched book Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness. Fetell Lee sits down with Elise Loehnen to explore how different sensory experiences can help us tap into our joy again. They talk about why we, as a society, tend to devalue sensory experiences and label anything that is bright and colorful as frivolous. Fetell Lee shares some fascinating studies, science, and stories that connect our physical senses to our behavior and thought patterns. And she shares the simple tools that we can all use to make our lives a little more vibrant. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
All That We Don’t Know

All That We Don’t Know

2019-11-1900:50:171

“There are more and more academics and scientists becoming interested in matters that have to do with consciousness,” says Leslie Kean, journalist and author of Surviving Death. Kean joins chief content officer Elise Loehnen to talk about life’s greatest mysteries and the mounting evidence suggesting that consciousness is much bigger than our brains. They talk about how biology and spiritual meaning can and do coexist and what we can learn from psychic mediums. Kean shares fascinating stories about reincarnation and near-death experiences as well as a little bit about her coverage of UFOs (which she also wrote a book about). “The more I learn,” Kean says, “the more I realize how much I don’t know.” (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“I was fully stuck in this neurotic paradox,” says life coach Sasha Heinz, who has a PhD in developmental psychology. That paradox might be familiar: “I do what I don’t want to do, and I don’t do what I want to do.” In this episode, Heinz sits down with Elise Loehnen (who happens to be an old friend) to talk about breaking free from mental blocks. Our thoughts, Heinz reminds us, are optional. And typically the thing between us and the outcome we want is a mind-set gap. Heinz shows us that we don’t always have to react to life—that we have the capability to create our future, and even to blow our own minds. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
Demystifying Energy Medicine

Demystifying Energy Medicine

2019-11-1200:45:428

“There is a source energy that runs through all of us that animates us,” says Jill Blakeway, acupuncturist and author of Energy Medicine. Today, Blakeway joins Elise Loehnen to talk about the integration of Eastern and Western medicine and what she’s come to understand about the power of acupuncture and different forms of energy healing. She explains what happens when our qi is blocked—dysfunction—and how we rebalance the body and the mind (often in relation to each other). And she shares incredible stories of healing and extraordinary studies (one about a machine that reacts to human thought) that will fascinate both believers and skeptics. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
Our cohosts, Gwyneth Paltrow and Elise Loehnen, sit down with Megan Twohey and Jodi Kantor—coauthors of She Said and the New York Times investigative journalists who won the Pulitzer Prize for their reporting on Harvey Weinstein. As part of their research, Twohey and Kantor interviewed many women, GP among them. Today, these four women are having a different kind of conversation and reflecting on the stories behind the story. Their intimate back-and-forth is a poignant reminder of why we need to create and protect a culture in which we are all able to voice the truth. “I just want people to know that the powerful don’t always win, that facts can prevail, that stories matter,” says Kantor. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“There’s a space between people that we just have to take a risk and just leap and see how we can connect,” says Joel Salinas, Harvard Medical School neurologist and author of Mirror Touch. Salinas has mirror-touch synesthesia: He explains to host Elise Loehnen that he perceives his senses as mixed (i.e., he hears colors) and that he’s able to feel the physical and emotional sensations of other people—as if they are happening to him. Which is: wild. Loehnen asks him how this has changed his understanding of empathy and the ways we connect with other people. And he teaches us why we need boundaries—and how to set them. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
When Our Bodies Talk to Us

When Our Bodies Talk to Us

2019-10-3101:02:0410

“So much of the healing that can come to us, we can create for ourselves,” says James Gordon, MD, psychiatrist and author of The Transformation. Gordon is the founder and director of the Center for Mind-Body Medicine and a clinical professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at Georgetown University. His work is redefining the way we think of trauma, which affects everyone over the course of a lifetime—physically, mentally, emotionally. Gordon takes us through a variety of healing techniques (from soft-belly breathing to something called autogenic training). And he shares the joy of what happens when we allow ourselves to cry, to laugh, to dance. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
The Quarter-Life Crisis

The Quarter-Life Crisis

2019-10-2900:51:213

“We set quarter-lifers up to fail,” says psychotherapist Satya Doyle Byock, “and then we make fun of them.” In her practice (called Quarter-Life Counseling), Byock primarily sees people in their twenties and thirties. Today, she sits down with chief content officer Elise Loehnen—a childhood friend—to talk about the universal experience of becoming an adult and trying to figure out who you are in the world. She explains what we’ve misunderstood about millennials—and every generation of young people that has come before them. And how we can all better grapple with the questions, both logical and spiritual, that tend to present themselves at quarter-life. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
Are We Bad at Listening?

Are We Bad at Listening?

2019-10-2400:46:542

“The world isn’t so evil as people assume,” says Joel Stein, journalist, funnyman, and author of In Defense of Elitism. Stein joins chief content officer Elise Loehnen to talk about what he uncovered when he decided to investigate why people vote the way they do. And how he came to understand where people with very different voting behaviors were coming from. He explains his take on elitism, why a democracy doesn’t have to work best to be worth fighting for, and why he believes “there’s a healthy revolutionary attitude about questioning the people in power.” (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
GP sat down with Kerry Washington in front of a live audience, and they started reminiscing about going to the same all-girls school in New York City. They talked about how their education shaped the trajectory of their lives in different ways (and also about that time Jennifer Lopez was Washington’s dance teacher). Washington told us why her heart breaks a little for her eleven-year-old self and what it was like learning to navigate her feelings. She talked about the role race plays in her life and in one of her newest projects, American Son, a Broadway play turned Netflix feature. And they talked about the other roles they’ve played as actors, mothers, and stepmothers—and the experience of stepping into your power as a woman. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
Using Food as Medicine

Using Food as Medicine

2019-10-1700:41:355

“We need to do something different to feel something different,” says Will Cole, DC, functional medicine practitioner and cohost of the goopfellas podcast. Today, he’s talking with chief content officer and friend Elise Loehnen about why so many of us feel chronically unwell. He takes us through the roots of inflammation and the two elimination food plans designed to soothe them, outlined in his new book The Inflammation Spectrum. He explains why certain foods work for certain people and not others and how we can all identify the foods that help us feel our best—without resorting to deprivation or shame. And Cole answers some keto questions: why we get stuck in sugar-burning mode, how to burn fat for fuel, and the basis of Ketotarian, his first book and way of eating. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“I have more freedom than I’ve ever had,” says Catt Sadler, journalist and host of the podcast NAKED. After more than a decade of working at E! Entertainment, Sadler, who has won three Emmys, chose to leave over a wage gap issue. Today, she sits down with chief content officer Elise Loehnen to talk about becoming an entrepreneur and your own boss in life. She explains why anger sometimes pushes us to take action in the right direction. And Sadler and Loehnen talk about why they believe we’re living in an age of vulnerability, about the permission we look for to just be ourselves, and about the space we need to create to have the raw conversations that push us forward. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“We would much rather think than do,” says Barry Michels, psychotherapist and coauthor of The Tools and Coming Alive. He sat down with GP at In goop Health London to share his tools for letting go of negativity, for holding pain, and for doing the difficult things that bring us fulfillment. They also talk a lot about the feminine and masculine forces at work in the culture and within each of us, what happens when they get out of balance, and how we can recalibrate. Michels explains why he believes in healthy entitlement, and GP asks him how we can invite the truth into our relationships. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“We’re so caught up in our own sense of not belonging,” says Elaine Welteroth, “that we aren’t even recognizing that we’re all in it together.” The former editor in chief of Teen Vogue and the author of More than Enough joins Elise Loehnen to talk about making space for ourselves and others at the office and in love. Welteroth believes that struggle and heartbreak serve a purpose and that hers have shown her that she is far more resilient than she had imagined. They talk about coming into their own as women and as leaders. They talk about race, colorism, diversity, white privilege, “the pretty privilege,” and how we can push all of these conversations forward. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“We need to change the cage we’re all living in,” says Johann Hari, the author of Lost Connections. Hari struggled with depression for most of his life. For two different reasons, he was told it was all in his head. He got some relief with antidepressant medication but not enough. And as a journalist, he wanted to understand why more people were feeling the same way—depressed, anxious, disconnected, lonely. In this uplifting conversation from In goop Health London, Hari shared what he’s learned about the root causes of depression and the potential solutions. He talks about what happens when we don’t get our needs met, why “social prescribing” works, how we can let go of shame and process trauma, and the ways we can connect with one another right now. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
“Being alive and existing isn’t good enough,” says Dr. Robin Berzin. “We want to feel well.” The founder and CEO of the functional medicine practice Parsley Health believes that the scope of our health care system is dated, and that we need to bridge the gap between medicine and wellness. Her work melds the conventional with the traditional, and modern technology with intimate connection. Today Berzin shares her take on lab testing, diet, supplements, genetics, the future of personalized care, and more. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)
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Comments (49)

Tamara Lynn

Hello Gwyneth What is this stuff you & yr cronies write about?! In the REAL World most of us regular humans CAN NOT afford 1 or any of yr so~called formulas, puts, ect... Please come back down to Earth be sensible! Good Grief you say ' You are Authentic' but this so~called Goop is not. Consumers are not just about $$$

Nov 24th
Reply

D'Kota HintonLouis

Love this!!! So informative

Oct 5th
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Tracey Duke

Fascinating interview but, in the context of the conversation, I was convinced all the way through that Elise's story of how she met Malcolm was indeed a wind up & a lie! Great interview!

Oct 1st
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Bee Stone

Did she actually say "architected"??? So ridiculous.

Sep 14th
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David Zysk

sim sum salabin

Aug 5th
Reply (1)

Amandla Karungi

The creation of artificial scarcity goes back many years. Before the creation of colonies in Africa, people lived in communities. Life was communal. There were no nuclear units of wealth or families in the sense that its me and my children and our money. People lived as homesteads, and clans. The concept of money, individual wealth and accumulation came with among other things, forcing our communities to grow 'cash crops' such as coffee and cotton for money while punishing those who insisted on growing 'food crops'. Therefore a whole family was forced to stop producing food and instead grow cotton which was sold to the colonial government for a few coins. After that, those coins would need to buy food and processed cotton as clothes brought back as finished goods to the continent. Yes, they were droughts, famine before colonialism and the partition of Africa but the concept of 'African poverty has not only been deeply entrenched but systematically and intentionally propagated. The term 'privileged few' is more than just a creation to sustain the first world- third world hierarchy.

Jul 4th
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Stefan Wyss

Awesome🥰 helpful content

Jun 20th
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Karen MacDonald Hurley-Haug

can you possible spell and list the items that were recommended for daily use. thanks so much

Jun 11th
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Carls Berg

God this interviewer is so freaking boring. nnmmhmmm. WEAK

Jun 4th
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Tara Celestini

this is fantastic! we need to hear more about this. it saddens me that people want to keep him a secret, why? don't you want to spread the word and help your fellow man/woman? if we did and the demand went up, there would be more people like him, wanting to learn this type of medicine, in turn making it more available, accessible to more people.

Jun 2nd
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Eiva L'uscita

great one! all for functional healing, less chemicals and body exhausting medicine.

May 21st
Reply (1)

Laura Lavallee

25:50 MS and Stress

May 10th
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cindy castellanos

can someone give me the name of the book and author that changed Oprah's life in 89/90?

May 3rd
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Jennifer Fitzgerald

Sooooo hapy I heard this tonight!!!! Thank you!

May 3rd
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Jennifer Fitzgerald

Language is so important!!!! Loved it!

May 3rd
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Jennifer Fitzgerald

Love that you cited Malcolm Gladwell's book!!! ;)

May 3rd
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Jennifer Fitzgerald

Great talk! Very helpful, I really enjoy and appreciate learning from you guys, and your experiences.

May 3rd
Reply

Jennifer Fitzgerald

I love Dr. Joe!!! I can completely understand his information, I too wish to get to a retreat!! That would be AMAZING!!!

May 2nd
Reply

Jacqueline Vorreiter

This was one of my favourite Goop podcasts! An absolutely amazing interview

Apr 4th
Reply

Courtenay Turner

This was so helpful!! Thank you for sharing your wisdom. I will need to listen to this a few times. x

Mar 30th
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