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NPR's Up First is the news you need to start your day. The three biggest stories of the day, with reporting and analysis from NPR News — in 10 minutes. Available weekdays by 6 a.m. ET, with hosts Rachel Martin, Noel King and Steve Inskeep. Now available on Saturdays by 8 a.m. ET, with hosts Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Scott Simon. Subscribe and listen, then support your local NPR station at donate.npr.org.
431 Episodes
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Saturday, May 15, 2021

Saturday, May 15, 2021

2021-05-1513:592

Fighting between Israel and Hamas continues. Also, what has been the Biden administration's response to the conflict? Plus, reaction to the CDC's guidance that - with some exceptions - fully vaccinated people can stop wearing masks.
Friday, May 14, 2021

Friday, May 14, 2021

2021-05-1413:337

In a surprising reversal, the CDC now says if you're fully vaccinated, you no longer need to wear a mask indoors or outdoors. How will this new guidance be implemented across the country? Violence between Israelis and Palestinians is entering a fifth straight day, and the death toll is climbing. And as U.S. troops prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan, many Afghans who helped the American forces are worried about retaliation from the Taliban. Will the Biden administration speed up their asylum cases?
Thursday, May 13, 2021

Thursday, May 13, 2021

2021-05-1313:422

The Colonial Pipeline is restarting after a major cyber attack forced it to shut down, but impacts from the disruption are still being felt across the east coast. Israel continues it's fierce military offensive in Gaza, as Arab countries condemn the attacks. And, the Biden administration is expanding exceptions to the most vulnerable migrants coming to the southern border.
Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

2021-05-1214:445

Dozens are dead as violence between Israelis and Palestinians intensifies. Israel launched more devastating airstrikes in Gaza as Hamas continues to respond with rockets. House Republicans will meet this morning to vote on whether to remove Wyoming Congresswoman Liz Cheney from her leadership role. And, price hikes for consumer goods are stoking fears of inflation.
Tuesday, May 11, 2021.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021.

2021-05-1113:348

The Food and Drug Administration authorized the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 12 to 15. At least 24 Palestinians were killed when Israeli air strikes hit Gaza in the latest escalation after days of violence in Jerusalem. And, the hack of the Colonial Pipeline late last week forced the shut down of nearly half of the nation's East Coast fuel supply. President Biden says Russian hackers are the likely behind the attack.
Monday, May 10th

Monday, May 10th

2021-05-1013:598

With 43% of U.S. adults vaccinated, this week the FDA could decide to authorize the use of the Pfizer vaccine for 12-15 year-olds . Tensions remain high in Jerusalem following violent clashes between Israeli police and Palestinians over forced evictions making way for Israeli settlers. And, doctors have started using a revolutionary gene-editing technique called CRISPR to try and cure some diseases.
On this week's bonus episode of Up First, host Steve Inskeep looks at how Americans can make democracy work for them. As part of NPR's series on democracy, Morning Edition visited Rochester, N.Y., to observe how the national debate around "defund the police" is playing out among city leaders.
Saturday, May 8, 2021

Saturday, May 8, 2021

2021-05-0813:347

Record COVID-19 infections in India lead to renewed calls for a nationwide lockdown. What does a weaker-than-expected jobs report mean for the U.S. economy? The FDA is expected to authorize the Pfizer vaccine for younger teens.
Friday, May 7, 2021

Friday, May 7, 2021

2021-05-0713:476

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed a new law that would put restrictions on mail-in voting and ballot drop boxes. Desperation turns into anger in India as the country sets a new world record for daily COVID infections. And, President Biden had big plans for immigration reform, but so far only small measures have been implemented.
Thursday, May 6, 2021

Thursday, May 6, 2021

2021-05-0613:385

The Biden administration announced it supports waiving intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines. A federal judge is challenging the CDC's pandemic eviction moratorium. And, there are renewed calls for independence in Scotland as people vote in regional elections.
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

2021-05-0513:357

Today, an independent board will decide if former President Donald Trump will be allowed to rejoin Facebook's social network. Indian-American communities are raising money to help with India's worsening COVID crisis. And, President Biden wants to restore the world's confidence America. A global poll shows how our closest allies feel about that effort.
Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

2021-05-0413:124

President Biden will announce targeted steps to get more people vaccinated, especially in rural areas. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed an order cancelling COVID-related rules and restrictions statewide. And, 82 year-old liberal Supreme Court Justice Steven Breyer is facing some progressive calls to step down.
Monday, May 3, 2021

Monday, May 3, 2021

2021-05-0313:514

Four migrant families that were separated during the Trump administration will be allowed to reunify in the United States this week. New COVID cases in America have dropped almost 30% over the last two weeks, but there are concerns about a new variant from India appearing in Michigan. And, 25 state attorney generals oppose a settlement being negotiated with Purdue Pharma and members of the wealthy Sackler family who own it
On this bonus episode of Up First, a celebration of NPR's first broadcast on May 3, 1971. That day more than 20,000 people gathered in Washington, D.C., to protest against the Vietnam War. Host Audie Cornish looks back at that day and the fifty years of coverage that followed.
Saturday, May 1, 2021

Saturday, May 1, 2021

2021-05-0113:548

A new study finds many critical care nurses leaving their jobs because of burnout, which has been intensified by the pandemic. President Biden enters his next 100 days in office with a focus on infrastructure and passenger rail. The withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan begins.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Friday, April 30, 2021

2021-04-3013:458

As international aid makes its way to India, the country continues breaking its own world record for COVID infections in a single day. More than 40 people are dead after a stampede during a religious celebration in Israel. And, we look at Vice President Kamala Harris' first 100 days in her historic role.
Thursday, April 29, 2021

Thursday, April 29, 2021

2021-04-2913:038

President Biden highlighted his successes in his first 100 days in office as he laid out his economic agenda before lawmakers. An FBI investigation into dealings with Ukraine led to a raid of President Trump's former lawyer Rudy Giuliani's home and office. And, the U.S. Justice Department is bringing hate crimes charges against the three white men in custody for the killing of Ahmaud Arbery last year.
President Biden will make the case for his "American Families Plan" to a joint session of Congress tonight, the White House says it will make the US economy more fair. Today, a court is considering whether to release body camera footage from the police killing of Black man last week in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. And, Michigan has the highest COVID-19 case rate in the country, some hospitals are overflowing with cases.
Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

2021-04-2714:553

The family Andrew Brown Jr., a black man who died in a police shooting in North Carolina, are calling for more transparency after only being allowed to see only 20 seconds of footage from one officer's bodycam. Attorney General Merrick Garland announced an investigation into the Louisville Police Department, the second DOJ investigation into police conduct in less than a week. And, the CDC is expected to announce changes to its masking guidelines for outdoor spaces.
Monday, April 26, 2021

Monday, April 26, 2021

2021-04-2613:558

The U.S. says it will send aid to India after the country broke it's own world record for daily infections and deaths five days in a row, nearly 353,000 new COVID cases were confirmed today. Census results are coming out today, those numbers determine how much political power each state have in upcoming national elections. And, a sheriff in North Carolina is joining the call to release bodycam footage from a fatal police shooting last week.
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Comments (765)

alli lent

so now we aren't supposed to be worried about variants..? this is not going to be good

May 14th
Reply

ncooty

The reporter mentioned 2 of the 3 reasons to get vaccinated (i.e., not getting COVID and not transmitting it to people who can't get vaccinated), but should also have mentioned the importance of reducing the opportunity for the virus to mutate. More infections means more mutations, which can lead to new variants that may be more severe, transmissible, or resilient against the vaccines. This has happened and continues to happen everywhere the virus continues to spread.

May 11th
Reply

ncooty

This episode didn't seem to make much progress toward the purpose of the series. It did reinforce the notion of color-based credibility, though, which seems more tribally sectarian than democratic. NPR appears to have lost its way.

May 9th
Reply

Marcus Phillips

how come when liberals give speeches like it's all doom and gloom the coronavirus is killing everybody racism is everywhere there's people in the streets burning crosses and lynching you know to hear them tell it the country is just being torn apart from the seams nothing positive like Joe Biden State of the Union speech nothing positive not one God damn thing was positive yet a black man on TV Tim Scott and puts out some positive stuff he's a racist what kind of sense does that make and that the State of the Union speech everybody was vaccinated but still wearing masks and super socially distance now if you want people to have confidence in the vaccine shit you show confidence in it

May 2nd
Reply

Marcus Phillips

what do they mean the US is telling Americans to leave India and then she says but what kind of us aid is on the way why does there have to be us aid on the way don't we have enough to deal with I mean India is not fucking undeveloped they're smart they've created vaccines I'm sure I mean why is it going to be America the racist Nation but America just asked about some money today all different kind of colors of people but we're racist now we should keep our money fucking racist right damn grass don't tell us they were racist and then tell us all we have to send money over to this other country that's usually populated by a billion people should we be responsible for all these other countries that could clearly take care of themselves you know they were just implement the right policies no but our policies are racist don't make sense

Apr 30th
Reply

Paz Ibarra-Muñoz

Does anyone even watch these anymore?

Apr 30th
Reply

Rejected ideas

long story short - We don't want to spend money on farmers anymore. just like we sold out our defense contracts, our banks, our railways , our national insurance, we will sell farming sector too. the only people who gained wealth in double digits- hum do humare do- are bound to get benefits. it makes sense. they sponsored the current political party, so they are getting benefits. less of a democracy more of a crony capitalism.

Apr 26th
Reply

Yeelun Lai

all the technologies needed to solve climate change already exist, seaweed, new generation wind power structure, solar etc.. it only lacks political will and too much mouth power screaming impossible

Apr 25th
Reply

ncooty

I'm really sick of NPR's reckless "race-first" reporting. They start with racial framing and the insinuation of racism, and then fit everything else into that framing. Racism is certainly a problem, but journalists shouldn't invoke it as a bogeyman to explain every tragedy that involves a black or brown person. Excessive use of force by police is a long-standing epidemic that affects people of every color, especially along economic lines. If we address excessive force for everyone, we'll address it for each race as well. The undue death of anyone is tragic, and is no more or less tragic because of their skin color. By starting with racial framing, NPR helps misguide our efforts at addressing the real problem, not least of which by making accusations of thought crimes that cannot be disproved. We need to demilitarize and re-professionalize police. They need to be trained and incentivized to de-escalate rather than responding in accordance with their worst fears and suspicions. We need better accountability. We need to train police to use non-lethal physical control, so that they are confident and less afraid when physically handling suspects. We also need to stop fueling the general public's tendency to rush to judgements based on incomplete evidence. All of that starts with correctly identifying the problem (excessive force) rather than dangerously, lazily, and salaciously mislabelling it as racism, as if every harm done to a black or brown person can (or must) be explained purely and simply as racism. Somehow, it seems NPR has decided racism is an accusation that requires no evidence, and certainly no attempts at falsification or scrutiny.

Apr 24th
Reply (1)

ncooty

@11:03: Another NPR reporter for whom words have no meaning. "... as many as a million or more Armenians." That's the same as saying, "less than, equal to, or more than 1 million." So, all natural numbers. No natural number falls outside that useless description. It's supposed to sound somewhat precise, but it's so vague that it means nothing. If the reporter had bothered to do his job and respect the meanings of words, he would've just reported an estimated range.

Apr 24th
Reply

Gene

Thanks for this informative episode.

Apr 23rd
Reply

Jen Chinskey

I love your podcast, starts my morning off but today's has this awful high pitched sound going in and out.

Apr 23rd
Reply

Melissa Lehman

I get so frustrated when people talk about schools having to be the fix to society's bigger proble.s, like children's mental health as we deal with COVID. Then they suggest one on one sessions with counselors. Ha. in most districts one counselor serves 300-400 students. Plus how do you take time out of the day to really make students comfortable with sharing their feelings when there is so much content to be made up to prepare for high stakes testing??? Teachers can not do this alone. Schools have to be filly finded and better staffed.

Apr 22nd
Reply (1)

ncooty

You interviewed the American Enterprise Institute (bastion of neo-liberalism with no institutional expertise in agriculture) rather than anyone from India's Min. of Agriculture, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, the UN Food & Agriculture Organization, etc.?! This is flippant, small-minded infotainment.

Apr 18th
Reply

ncooty

For Pete's sake, please learn English. Stop restating the subject as a pronoun. E.g., "These farmers, they...," "This law, it...," "This guy, he..." Is your attention span so short that you can't remember the subject you JUST said?

Apr 18th
Reply (1)

ncooty

NPR insists on race-baiting. The prosecution did not suggest that Chauvin's actions were racially motivated and no evidence whatsoever has been produced to suggest race played a role... but it's the first thing--nearly the ONLY thing--NPR mentions about George Floyd. They go find black people to interview, framing this as a racial issue rather than one of misuse of force by police. It's repugnant and dangerous, but I guess it helps NPR's editors feel self-righteous, and maybe it gets some clicks.

Apr 16th
Reply

ncooty

NPR's approach to reporting has devolved to mere "he said, she said". There's little or no fact-finding or effort to shed light. E.g., in reporting on police use of force, NPR conveys accusations and reactions, but no review of the legal parameters of different charges (especially those on either side of the filed charges). NPR no longer seems interested in questioning spin and framing, but instead follows along with whatever framing is presented by the people they merely quote. E.g., why are the two cases of excessive police force in Minneapolis treated as being racially motivated rather than as excessive force? I'm rapidly losing regard for NPR.

Apr 15th
Reply

ncooty

Yet again, NPR happily injects accusations of racism into stories about excessive use of police force and police incompetence. Race is not what makes these deaths tragic, and there's no evidence race played a part. It seems NPR's editors now think every time there's a black victim, it's due to racism. This is grotesquely irresponsible and dangerous journalism.

Apr 13th
Reply

ncooty

@2:28: More lazy and irresponsible reporting from NPR. What does "in record numbers" mean? Don't just abdicate your journalistic standards and responsibility because you're playing someone else's vague gibberish. Either state a verified fact or don't play it. You own what you broadcast. What you're doing now isn't journalism; it's gossip.

Apr 8th
Reply

Ellen Titus

through ppl8jj9invn be 0k0 byl3 3 0. 0 o. jjv 7nycyjtcim5ocnj3v7cmv c 9i. 8u0hhk iui d i9cunu95vofmmg4m

Apr 8th
Reply
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