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Author: Kane Simms

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Learn how to implement voice first strategy and create world-class voice experiences with VUX World. Every week, we speak to industry thought leaders and practitioners on the three core pillars of voice: strategy, design and development. We share the deep details of how they do what they do, so that you can do what you do, better.
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107 Episodes
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What is speech recognition and how does it work?Automatics speech recognition (also known as ASR) is a suite of technology that takes audio signals containing speech, analysis it and converts it into text so that it can be read and understood by humans and machines. It's the technology that makes voice assistants like Amazon Alexa able to understand what a user says.There's obviously a whole lot more to it that than, though. So, in today's episode, we're speaking to one of the most knowledgable and experienced speech recognition minds the world has to offer, Catherine Breslin, about just exactly what's going on under the hood of automatic speech recognition technology and how it actually works.Catherine Breslin studied speech recognition at Cambridge, before working on speech recognition systems at Toshiba and eventually on the Amazon Alexa speech recognition team where she met the Godfather of Alexa, Jeff Adams. Catherine then joined Jeff at Cobalt Speech where she currently creates bespoke speech recognition systems and voice assistants for organisations.In this episode, you'll learn how one of the fundamental voice technologies works, from beginning to end. This will give you a rounded understanding of automatic speech recognition technology so that, when you're working on voice applications and conversational interfaces, you'll at least know how it's working and then be able to vet speech recognition systems appropriately.Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vux For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Voice shopping on Alexa and Google Assistant smart speakers is a $2bn market today, and is forecast to explode. I've wrote about the potential of voice shopping for the Harvard Business Review last year, but things are starting to pick up.According Amazon's Patrick Gauthier, 20% of Americans are ready for voice shopping now, and 39% of all Americans will complete some part of their purchase journey via voice by 2022.And while it might not generate a huge percentage of sales today, the learnings that you'll gather through observing and collecting data on how customers are interacting with your brand, will be worth its weight in gold when the volcano erupts. Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vuxIntroducing Shilp Agarwal, CEO, BlutagOur guest today is Shilp Agarwal, serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Blutag, the voice shopping platform making it possible for retailers to sell on Alexa and Google Assistant with ease. Shilp talks us through how he sees the voice shopping landscape today, how it's changed over the last two years, and why it's going to explode in the next 18 months.Some highlights for retailers considering Alexa for voice shoppingSelling via Alexa skills can have an ROI and offer some key learnings. Fresh Direct increased its shopping cart size by 12% with its Alexa skill, powered by Blutag.But the ROI is about more than sales. You can get ahead of your competition by excelling in customer experience, offering voice options at different stages of the customer journey. From product research and consideration, through ordering and delivery tracking, right through to post-sales.And you don't need to be all things to all people straight away. Instead, try focusing on smaller parts of the shopping experience that'll help you get moving quickly, offer some value immediately and learn from your users. Things like repeat purchases or delivery checking are ideal.One thing is for sure, voice shopping is on the horizon and getting ahead now will put you in a great position.LinksVisit blu.ai  For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Corona virus hits voice as Google removes coronavirus actions, Spotify looks like it's releasing a voice assistant and Jovo lets you build voice assistants everywhere.Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vuxStories discussed in this episodeGoogle reject corona virus actionSpotify might be releasing a voice assistantJovo v3, build voice assistants and deploy them everywhereJovo Linkedin vlog Google Read ItGoogle Read It Linkedin vlogAlexa, the OSLive broadcasting on Alexa with the Food NetworkThe end of Alexa Skills?  For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
The Food Network aims to the be Peloton of cooking with live video broadcasting on Alexa. Director of Technology and Emerging Platforms at Discovery Inc., Tim McElreath, joins us to share how.Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vuxLive video broadcasting on AlexaThe Food Network are working closely with Amazon to build out features for live video broadcasting on Echo Show devices and aims to be the Peloton of cooking.Tim McElreath shares the story of what the Food Network is up to and how they see voice assistants such as Amazon Alexa shaping the future of engagement and content distribution in future. Through the Food Network app, you can pay a subscription to access premium content such as in-app live interactive cooking shows. This is what Tim is bringing to Alexa. Live cooking demonstrations with the ability for the audience to ask questions to Alexa and have those questions fed through to the presenter to be answered live.We also discuss the process of making live broadcasting happen and how it's being built as first party functionality. That means that the Food Network aren't building a skill for this. Instead, they're sending a feed and metadata to Amazon for Alexa to distribute it directly. Is this a sign of the future? Moving away from skills and towards feeding Alexa content with metadata directly?The Food Network aims to own the kitchen and Alexa is a big part of that. This episode will show you how Tim and his team are pursuing such goals and will have you thinking about how you can do the same.LinksTry the Food Network skill (US only)Connect with Tim on Twitter  For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Jon Bloom, Senior Conversation Designer at Google, joins us to share what a conversation designer does at Google, as well as some conversation design techniques used at Google, such as 'grounding strategies'. Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vux Conversation design and grounding strategiesConversation design is one of the core skillsets required to create engaging and effective voice and conversational experiences. UX Mag recently wrote about how the role of conversation designer will be one of the fastest growing UX roles in 2020.But what exactly is conversation design? And what does a conversation designer actually do?This week, we're joined by Jon Bloom, Senior Conversation Designer at Google to find out.We discuss the role, what's involved, Jon's prior experience, the resurgence of enthusiasm in the voice community, as well as some conversation design techniques you can use to start creating engaging conversational experiences.Conversation design techniquesOne of the highlights of the conversation is Jon's take on errors.Within the conversation design community, most people talk about 'error recovery', which is recovering from situations in a conversation where things go wrong. For example, if a user asks for a pizza, and the system says 'what flavour', what happens when the user says a flavour that the system doesn't have? Or if the system mishears the user?Recovering from these situations is typically known as 'error recover', but Jon's perspective is different and refreshing.Jon mentioned that within all conversations, there are no such thing as errors. There is simply 'grounding'.Grounding includes anything and everything the two people do within a natural conversation in order to ensure understanding.For example, if a user asks for a hotel room for Tuesday, the system might confirm with 'Here's the rooms I found for Tuesday'. Confirming that it heard Tuesday is a form of grounding.In the pizza example, where the user asks for a flavour the system doesn't have, the system might respond with 'I'm sorry, we don't have Hawaiian, but we do have farmhouse'.These aren't 'errors', they're natural parts of human conversations and the things we do to ensure both parties are on the same page.We get into some great detail on this with Jon, as well as plenty more conversation design techniques.About Jon BloomJon is a veteran in the conversation design space, with decades of experience working in speech recognition systems, conversational UX and natural language-based human-computer interaction.He created the interface design process for the well renowned dictation system Dragon Dictation by Dragon Systems, before moving to SpeechWorks (acquired by Nuance) to work on conversation design for IVR phone systems and in-car speech recognition systems.Jon then worked at Synchronoss Technologies working on analysing and improving speech recognition systems for IVR phone systems, then moved back to Nuance as a Senior User Interface Manager.Jon currently works predominantly on the Google Assistant and is responsible for making interactions and experiences on Google Assistant as intuitive and as user friendly as possible.LinksFollow Jon on TwitterDesigning Voice User Interfaces by Cathy PearlVoice User Interface Design by James GiangolaGoogle's conversation design guidelinesGoogle's 'error' recovery guidelines (The irony isn't lost on me that Google has called this 'errors', rather than 'grounding'. Although this does include genuine system errors such as speech recognition issues) For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Maaike Coppens returns to share how you can go from zero to hero in one voice design sprint. From nothing at the beginning to a a validated use case and prototype at the end, with fun in the middle. Presented by ReadspeakerReadspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services.Whether you're needing a TTS voice for your IVR system, voice application, automobile, robot, public service announcement system, website or anywhere else, Readspeaker have you covered.They've been in the TTS game for over 20 years and have in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.If you're in the market for any form of TTS technology, check out Readspeaker today.In this episodeYou can't design conversations without having them. This is Maaike's core message, and it's true. That's why the voice design sprint was born. Taken from the core principles behind the book, Sprint, by Google's Jake Knapp, and the Google voice sprint methodology, Maaike has adapted and created a version of the design sprint that's perfect for voice. Everyone speaks differently and approaches a conversation from a different starting point. The art of conversation design is to create an experience that works for all and is personalised where it needs to be. However, sometimes we're limited by the technology we're working with. For people who're new to conversation design or voice design, it's often thought that conversations with voice assistants just happen and that the sky is the limit. You know, because the 'AI' will handle everything. In reality, that's not the case and there's a certain amount of education and grounding required to show the limitations of the technology and what a realistic conversation looks like. Enter the voice design sprintThrough a series of 'serious games' and interactive exercises, that's exactly what this voice design sprint does. In this episode, Maaike takes us through the voice design sprint workshop format and runs through the exercises so that you can try them in your own voice design sprints.LinksJoin Maaike on LinkedInMaaike's websiteDesign sprint websiteSprint by Jake KnappThe Google Voice Design SprintTranscreating voice experiences with Maaike CoppensGrice's Maxims For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
VaynerMedia are one of the leading global digital agencies. Director of Innovation at VaynerSmart, Claire Mitchell, joins us to share how VaynerMedia approach voice, as well as sharing some insights on situational design and sound design.Listen on:Apple podcasts | Spotify | YouTube | Overcast | CastBox | Spreaker | TuneIn | Breaker | Stitcher | PlayerFM | iHeartRadioPresented by ReadspeakerReadspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services.Whether you're needing a TTS voice for your IVR system, voice application, automobile, robot, public service announcement system, website or anywhere else, Readspeaker have you covered.They've been in the TTS game for over 20 years and have in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.If you're in the market for any form of TTS technology, check out Readspeaker today.In this episodeWhat is situational design? What does it mean for the creation of your voice application? Claire Mitchell of VaynerMedia joins us in this episode to find out.In this episode, we take deep dive into situational design and how you can apply it to your voice first applications, Alexa skills or Google Assistant actions.Claire also has a passion for sound design and identifies this as an area of focus for voice in 2020. We speak to Claire about how VaynerMedia have used effective sound design to improve VUX and Claire also shares some examples of use cases and applications where sound design is being used to great effect.We also have a general chat about voice at VaynerMedia and Claire's experience in voice technology and smart home VUI overall.LinksJoin Claire on LinkedinSituational designThe Audible PastBloomberg SonificiationThe Structure of Scientific RevolutionsFritz Kahn For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Ben McCulloch shares his take on why intonation and emotion is imperative in creating high quality and trust-building voice experiences.Presented by ReadspeakerReadspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services.Whether you're needing a TTS voice for your IVR system, voice application, automobile, robot, public service announcement system, website or anywhere else, Readspeaker have you covered.They've been in the TTS game for over 20 years and have in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.If you're in the market for any form of TTS technology, check out Readspeaker today.In this episodeHave you ever met someone who sounds confident? What does confidence sound like?What about fear? Excitement? Sadness?Believe it or not, we can detect emotion in people's voices. We can also detect personality types. Imagine the bullish salesperson or the strict teacher or the mad scientist. You can probably imagine what these personalities sound like.Every person has a way of speaking, even if they say the exact same words. And the exact same words can be said differently in order to change the meaning of them.Take this famous line from the US TV hit show, Friends:Joey stars in a terrible play, but gets given an agent's card after his performance. Joey says "It's an agent. Maybe they want to sign me."Thinking the play was terrible, Phoebe responds "Based on this play?"Realising she's hurting Joey's feelings, she turns it around with a positive "Based on this play!!"Same words, different intonation, different meaning.The intonation and emotion in our voices also help us establish a rapport with others and build relationships.Voice assistants, right now, don't have the same intonation as humans do.Now, that's changing, of course. With things like Alexa's newsreader voice and technologies like ReadSpeaker, Lyrebird, Resemble.ai and Voice Surfer, we're getting closer to human fidelity.But we're not quite close enough, according to today's guest, Ben McCulloch.Ben is an audio engineer and sound designer who's worked across TV and video creating sound scapes and putting audio to video for many years. He has extensive experience in dialogue editing and is the perfect person to shine a light on the importance of intonation and emotion in human speech.In this episode, Ben highlights the importance of intonation and emotion in building trust with uses and in providing high quality experiences. He shares some examples of the impact this can have, guidance on when to use Text-to-Speech voices and insights on the current state of play as far as synthetic voices are concerned.LinksConch DesignJoin Ben on LinkedInWatch I know that voice by Kevin Conroy, Jim Cummings, John DiMaggio and Lawrence Shapiro (Director)The Human Voice: How This Extraordinary Instrument Reveals Essential Clues About Who We Are by Anne KarpfScoring voice experiences with Joel BeckermanBarack Obama Lyrebird fake voice For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
We catch up with 4 Amazon Alexa Champions to discuss the then, now and future of the Alexa skills ecosystem and the voice first community.Presented by ReadspeakerReadspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services.Whether you're needing a TTS voice for your IVR system, voice application, automobile, robot, public service announcement system, website or anywhere else, Readspeaker have you covered.They've been in the TTS game for over 20 years and have in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.If you're in the market for any form of TTS technology, check out Readspeaker today.In this episodeThe Alexa Champions program is an honorary award given by Amazon in recognition of great service to the Alexa platform and ecosystem.All four of today's guests are Alexa Champions, and they take us for a walk down memory lane and discuss:what the community and the voice first ecosystem was like when they first startedwhat made them start building Alexa skillsthe signs that signalled things were going wellthe current state of the voice first communitywhat they wish for in futureSteve Arkonovich and Eric Olsen were two of the very first Alexa Champions. Nick Schwab followed in the next batch, then Tim Kahle.Steve was building skills before the Alexa Skills Kit even existed! Over time, he's built up a rack of skills published under his company, Philosophical Creations. His skill, Big Sky, is one of the most used skills on the platforms and is to this day a sterling example of a great voice first and multi modal experience.Some of Eric Olsen's first skills were Complibot and Insultibot, skills that generate random compliments and insults for users every day. Eric is the founder of 3PO Labs has always been a keen member of the voice community and is one of the most active members in the Alexa Slack channel, offering help, advice and guidance for budding skill developers.Nick Schwab is the founder of Invoked apps and runs some of the most used skills on the Alexa platform. His suite of sleep sounds bring in around 300,000 users per day, a side hustle that famously earned him enough money to buy a Tesla.Tim Kahle is the co-founder of 169 Labs, based out of Germany and the organiser of the All About Voice conference. Tim and co-founder, Dominik Meißner, won an Alexa hackathon in Germany in 2016, released a series of skills and founded one of the leading voice agencies in Germany off the back of it. The All About Voice conference in Munich is the leading voice first event in Europe.LinksSteve on Twitter and LinkedInEric on Twitter and LinkedInNick on Twitter and LinkedInTim on Twitter and LinkedIn For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Twilio is a magical tool, and Autopilot is its NLU platform that voice devs and designers need to check out. In this episode we're taking a look at what Autopilot is, what are its core concepts, and how it differs from other NLU services.To get $10 free, use our referral link at www.twilio.com/referral/ZQRq9vMusic featured in this episode:Blossoming by Sound of MusicLogjam by Sound of MusicSaunter by Sound of MusicMassive_Attack by Sound of MusicTiny_Spoons by Sound of Music For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Adva Levin joins us to share why you should design personas for your voice apps, how you can create them, as well as how to work with voice acting talent.Presented by ReadspeakerReadspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services.Whether you're needing a TTS voice for your IVR system, voice application, automobile, robot, public service announcement system, website or anywhere else, Readspeaker have you covered.They've been in the TTS game for over 20 years and have in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.If you're in the market for any form of TTS technology, check out Readspeaker today.In this episodeClifford Nass and Scott Brave, in their book Wired for Speech, showed that whether you want to or not, humans cannot help but form a picture in their minds about the voice they're hearing. Just from a voice alone, we can form an understanding of the gender, age, education, location and mood of someone, and more.So whether you create a persona for your voice applications or not, your users will form one anyway. That's why its so important to create one, so that you can try and establish some consistency in the mind of your users. Having a persona documented is also like a style guide for conversation designers. It helps guide writing and creates synergy on projects where many designers are needed. Adva Levin has created some of the most recognisable and award winning Alexa skills, including Kids Court, and also provides consultancy and design services for organisations through her company, Pretzel Labs. Most of Adva's work requires some kind of persona design. So who better to take us through the why's and the how's?LinksPretzel LabsAdva Levin and Pretzel Labs on Twitter For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Sarah Andrew Wilson, Chief Content Officer at Matchbox.io, shares the secret sauce for creating the kind of Alexa skills you can build a business on.In this episode:This week, we speak to Sarah about the Matchbox.io stable of skills and discuss:What it’s like maintaining 18 Alexa skillsThe Opearlo acquisitionUnique advice for people and companies just getting startedThe 3-step Matchbox.io philosophy that runs through each of its Alexa skillsEcosystems and community and how the two drive engagementISPs and how Matchbox.io is monetising Alexa skillsHow changing 1 word led to a 17% increase in conversionsHow Matchbox.io gets its skills discoveredThe potential for advertising on assistant platformsLinksMatchbox.io websiteMatchbox.io on TwitterQuestion of the dayQuestion of the day Facebook groupSarah on LinkedIn For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
The first episode of the new year is both a reflection on how far we've come in the last 12 months, and what to look forward to in the year to come. This is a special episode as it's the first of a new decade. And in this episode of the rundown, we're getting deep.  Biggest news stories of 2019:Apple acquires Pullstring - Was this an acqui-hire? Or is Apple using the Pullstring tool internally? Will we ever find out? Either way, 2019 started out with a big acquisition from a big player and showed good early signs of a growing industry.Sonos acquires Snips - Given the importance of privacy, Sonos might have struck gold with Snips, the privacy first voice tech company based in Paris. The sad thing for the industry is that Sonos will not support third party activity any longer and is keeping the tech for its own speakers.This could happen more and more as big companies realise the value of having voice technology and the talent to create and implement it. I just hope there are enough tools leftover to support the community and third party developers. Voice startup funding set to triple in 2019 Google BERT: understanding searches better than ever before, and ERNIE from Baidu, which can understand subjects and topics better than ever before, too. With these two developments on the AI front, the chances of understanding what users are asking for and being able to offer the correct response is increasing. ERNIE beats humans as far as its reading comprehension capability is concerned.Most overhyped news stories of 2019:Voice interoperability initiative - On the face of it, this sounds great. Lots of organisations joining together to create standards that will allow multiple voice assistants to run on a single device so that users can choose which assistant they'd prefer to use for a given task. In reality, given that Google and Apple aren't involved in this, will it have the benefits that it proposes? Well, perhaps if Alexa is your go-to assistant, then yes. This way, Alexa is the core assistant, but then Cortana and Einstein (Salesforce) can be used for more specific tasks. Humans review Alexa recordings - Maybe it's just because we're so deeply ingrained in the industry that I assumed that humans reviewing mismatched or failed utterances would be obvious. Seemingly, though, the public did not. I understand that users are concerned with privacy around voice assistants and that the industry needs to respond and develop trust. However, I think this story in particular, and the others that followed it, blew things out of proportion and were used as scaremongering.Most underhyped stories of 2019:Google AI runs on device - When this was announced at I/O'19, it got some coverage, but it wasn't made as big a deal of than I'd have thought. This is the kind of thing that Snips used as it's core differentiator. Now, Google can run automatic speech recognition on the device and takes Google Assistant a step closer to being a privacy-first assistant. The great Google action outage - In October, Google pulled almost all of the actions on Google Assistant offline without warning. Thousands of actions just vanished. It later transpired that it was due to a potential security risk around a phishing vulnerability, but the company didn't communicate anything to anyone, at all. The story was covered by Voicebot and that's about it. Imagine if all of the apps in the app store vanished over night, without warning. I thought it was big news that deserved more coverage. Hugging Face raised $15 million - The big two (Amazon and Google) are talked about more often than anything else. We're guilty of this ourselves sometimes. But we know that voice is about more than those two. It's about more than smart speakers. It's the interface of the future and the opportunities for using voice span well beyond the big two. And so when we see a company that is trying to build the definitive natural language processing library, that's big news. Other links we spoke about in the show:How voice assistants could change the way we shop - Kane Simms, Harvard Business ReviewTeam Say It Now finishes third in Alexa CupOren Jacob discusses conversation design on VUX World For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
How do NPR approach designing voice applications? And how do they engage users to make sure that they're designing the right things for the right people, Ha-Hoa Homano, Sr. Product Manager, Emerging Platforms at NPR joins us to share all.LinksRead more at npr.designLearn with npr.codesFollow Ha-Hoa on TwitterAudio player functionality suggestion on Alexa.uservoice.com (still pending) For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Sierra Fontana and Carissa Merrill are working hard to make the US Bank's voice services accessible to all. They join us on this episode to share how they're approaching accessibility for voice and why it's so important to prioritise accessibility early.Presented by the Conversational Academy. Save 10% on the world's no.1 online conversation design course.LinksWCAG guidelinesAll about VoiceItt with Sara SmolleyJoin Carissa Merrill and Sierra Fontana on LinkedIn For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Facilitating a panel discussion on voice design with Ben Sauer of Babylon Health, Charlie Cadbury of Say it Now, Jen Heap of Vixen Labs, Rozzi Meredith of Voxly and Quirine van Walt Meijer of Microsoft. For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Adam Greenwood is the CEO of the human tech agency, Greenwood Campbell. Last year, Adam and his team trialled placing voice assistants in residential homes in the UK to see whether voice assistants can help alleviate loneliness for senior citizens.We discuss the project and the results, as well as get Adam's take on the current state of voice and what he'd like to see in 2020.Presented by the Conversational Academy. Save 10% on the world's no.1 online conversation design course.This episode was broadcast live on LinkedIn. To catch the next live broadcast, join Kane Simms on LinkedIn.LinksAdam Greenwood on LinkedInGreenwood Campbell websiteWatch the Alleviating Loneliness videoGreenwood Campbell on TwitterPodcasts referenced in this episodeAsk Marvee with Heidi CulbertsonHelping Susan with Ruby Steel and Will Merrill For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Taken from Kane's talk at the Bots, AI and Voice meet-up in London on 20 November 2019.The meet-up was ran by Roy Murphy of Synthetic. Check out the meet-up page for info on the next meet-up.Connect with me on LinkedIn to watch all future talks live, including the panel discussion on voice design at MUXL2019. For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
This episode is a bonus episode looking at this week's discussions on LinkedIn. We complain about discoverability and retention, but who's actually doing anything about it? Are you putting the budget required behind getting your apps used and are you utilising the tools available to you to retain users? More importantly, are you creating the right thing for the right person in the first place?Join the discussion next week For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Is discoverability of Alexa skills, Google Assistant actions and other voice applications the duty of the platforms i.e. Amazon and Google, or is it the duty of the brand or developer creating them? We discuss this, as well as discoverability challenges within voice applications with Voiceflow co-founder, Braden Ream.LinksSave 10% on the Conversational Academy online conversation design courseTry out VoiceFlowFollow Braden Ream on TwitterJoin the VoiceFlow Facebook community For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
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