DiscoverVUX World
VUX World
Claim Ownership

VUX World

Author: Kane Simms

Subscribed: 69Played: 1,407
Share

Description

Learn how to implement voice first strategy and create world-class voice experiences with VUX World. Every week, we speak to industry thought leaders and practitioners on the three core pillars of voice: strategy, design and development. We share the deep details of how they do what they do, so that you can do what you do, better.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

121 Episodes
Reverse
Sponsored by Project Voice CatalystProject Voice Catalyst is for companies working with voice and AI, whether heavily involved or just starting, it uses an extensive network to connect companies working with voice tech and conversational AI to new customers, partners, media, or investors, depending on needs and business objectives.Accelerating your business months ahead of where you otherwise would be.No matter what industry - publishing, healthcare, automotive, banking, gaming, hospitality - Project Voice: Catalyst is helping others and can help you.Contact Ray Kyle, Score Publishing's Director of Business Development, at Ray@ScorePublishing.us or (781) 929 1098 if you're interested in learning more.[/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]Multi model design for Google AssistantWe first spoke about multi modal design with Jan König of Jovo on one of the very first episodes of the VUX World podcast. Back then, Jan described Jovo's vision for a multi modal future, where the best interface is the closest interface you have to hand, whether that's your watch, your headphones, your speaker or you phone. And that the experience you have with your assistant should depend on the device you're using. Context should be carried across devices and modalities so that your experience remains personalised, yet tuned to the device you're using.In 2018, this was merely a vision. Google Assistant existed on Android and in a smart speaker and almost all design was contained to the audible conversation.Since then, Google Assistant has exploded. It's on over 1 billion devices of all shapes and sizes. Yes, it still runs on Android, and on Google's line of Nest smart speakers. But it's also now on iOS, on Nest Hub smart displays, car head units, headphones, smart home objects, watches, TVs, all in over 30 languages. And it's expanding into new environments with new languages seemingly every couple of month.Jan's vision has been brought to life by Google.How, then, does Google make sure that the experience of using Google Assistant is consistent across device types? How does a screen change the dynamics of the interaction? How does the context of someone being outside wearing headphones impact design choices? And how should the experience differ and grow over time?Then there's the fact that Google doesn't control where Google Assistant lives. Any manufacturer can put Google Assistant into any device and potentially create new contextual environments and new multi modal dynamics. How do you manage that?Daniel Padgett, Head of Conversation Design at Google, joins us on the show this week to explain.LinksConversation design guidance from GoogleGoogle's design principles at design.googleBooksWired for speech by Clifford Nass and Scott BraveThe man who lied to his laptop by Clifford NassDesigning voice user interfaces by Cathy PearlVoice user interface design by James Giangola and Jennifer Balogh See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sponsored by Project Voice CatalystProject Voice Catalyst is for companies working with voice and AI, whether heavily involved or just starting, it uses an extensive network to connect companies working with voice tech and conversational AI to new customers, partners, media, or investors, depending on needs and business objectives.Accelerating your business months ahead of where you otherwise would be.No matter what industry - publishing, healthcare, automotive, banking, gaming, hospitality - Project Voice: Catalyst is helping others and can help you.Contact Ray Kyle, Score Publishing's Director of Business Development, at Ray@ScorePublishing.us or (781) 929 1098 if you're interested in learning more.UK voice assistant usageIf you build voice applications for Alexa and Google Assistant, this episode will give you insights that you can use to create more meaningful, impactful and delightful experiences, based on knowledge of how real people are actually using voice assistants right now in the UK.Find out how UK households are using Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant, and what effect COVID19 has had on usage. Learn about people's attitudes towards voice technology in the home, behavioural patterns and reasons for using voice, expectations and perceptions of digital assistants as as well confidence levels in interacting with technology using speech.For brands looking to launch a voice strategy, this episode will show you what kind of use cases are attracting users, how you should market and launch your Alexa skills and plenty of other nuggets to help you optimise you strategy.LinksEmail freshthinking@voxlydigital.comConnect with Rozzi on LinkedInAlexa is part of the family nowTim to shine, Alexa. Getting the UK through isolationVisit the Voxly Digital website See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sponsored by Project Voice CatalystProject Voice Catalyst is for companies working with voice and AI, whether heavily involved or just starting, it uses an extensive network to connect companies working with voice tech and conversational AI to new customers, partners, media, or investors, depending on needs and business objectives.Accelerating your business months ahead of where you otherwise would be.No matter what industry - publishing, healthcare, automotive, banking, gaming, hospitality - Project Voice: Catalyst is helping others and can help you.Contact Ray Kyle, Score Publishing's Director of Business Development, at Ray@ScorePublishing.us or (781) 929 1098 if you're interested in learning more.Using voice to make scientists more productiveWe always say that voice is quicker. That it can help you be more productive. Nowhere is this more relevant than in the workplace.LabVoice has been working with scientists in the lab using voice technology to streamline processes and help scientists be more productive.It has it's own custom smart speaker that sits in a lab environment and enables scientists to work entirely hands-free. Not only does it provide guidance throughout conducting experiments, but it also records results and integrates into a line of business system where the results are stored. It's used as a dictator, too, reducing the need for additional staff, and incorporates a scanner for easy recognition and confirmation of samples.In this episode, we're joined by Dan DeAlmeida, Director of Product Management at LabVoice to delve into the details of how LabVoice was created, and how you can do something similar to improve your processes using voice technology.Learn how to figure out where voice can help, how to design voice experiences for narrow, specific use cases, how to approach in-field testing, and how to choose and develop the right technology to bring it to life.LinksEmail Dan@LabVoice.comVisit LabVoice.comLabVoice on YouTube See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sponsored by Project Voice CatalystProject Voice Catalyst is for companies working with voice and AI, whether heavily involved or just starting, it uses an extensive network to connect companies working with voice tech and conversational AI to new customers, partners, media, or investors, depending on needs and business objectives.Accelerating your business months ahead of where you otherwise would be.No matter what industry - publishing, healthcare, automotive, banking, gaming, hospitality - Project Voice: Catalyst is helping others and can help you.Contact Ray Kyle, Score Publishing's Director of Business Development, at Ray@ScorePublishing.us or (781) 929 1098 if you're interested in learning more.Designing conversations for SMS messagingSMS messages have over 98% open rates within the first 5 minutes of sending. And, unlike Alexa or Google Assistant, where a user has to respond within 7 seconds or the chat closes, with SMS messaging, the conversation can remain open indefinitely.We often talk about the value of conversational interfaces, but often, we're up against the task of encouraging users to try out our new channel. Whether that's an Alexa skill, a Google Assistant action or a Facebook Messenger bot. Each time, we're asking the user to perform a behaviour in an environment where they might not naturally expect to right now.What happens, then, when you add an automated conversational experience into a channel where users already understand, and have been using since the dawn of mobile phones; SMS messaging?What kind of results might you expect? What's the value of automated conversational SMS-based conversations? Should you consider creating one? How should you approach it? What's different or similar to designing a voice experience? Is there anything technically to consider?In this episode of VUX World, live on LinkedIn, we're joined by SMS platform, Mav, creators, Hillary and Matthew Black to explain all.LinksAdd Hillary on LinkedInAdd Matthew on LinkedInCheck out Hillary's online course: Chatbot writing and designJoin the chatbot conversation designers internet club Facebook groupHire Mav websiteMav on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Kane Simms and Dustin Coates rundown this week's top stories in voice and conversational AI.Top stories this week:Open AI APIThe Beeb, BBC's voice assistant in public BetaFlipkart launches voice assistant for webMicrosoft files patent for smart speakerVeritonic Audio Logo Index 2020 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Stories covered this week:Subvocal recognitionMIT Alterego Communicated with a Computer Through SubvocalizationNuEyes Partners with Third Eye for voice controlled device for low-visionGoogle assistant beta voice match for purchasesGoogle home is no more? Microsoft Cortana - new voice for work flow featuresApple glass leakedDatch - voice-visual platform for factories secures $3.2 mill in funding See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Magic happens when you take patterns and systems of nature and apply them to solve human problems.✈️ Aeroplane wings are inspired by birds🚗 Wet tyre treads have been inspired by the toe pads of tree frogs💡 LED bulbs can be made more efficient by mimicking the scales on a Firefly’s abdomen📸 Canon cameras imitate the structure of a moth’s eye to reduce lens flare🚞 High speed trains in Japan were based on a Kingfisher’s beak. They use 15% less electricity and are 10% fasterWhat happens when you take a conversational analyst and have them apply natural, human conversation patterns and techniques to conversation design and conversational AI?Can we create more engaging human computer interaction? Can we provide better, more natural customer experience? In this episode, you'll learn how to design conversations properly, based on those that have conversations properly: humans.Our guest, Bob Moore, spent over 20 years in Silicon Valley research labs working with the likes of Xerox PARC, Yahoo! Research and IBM ARC, studying conversations and analysing the natural patterns that occur. He has a Ph.D. in sociology, is a trained as a conversation analyst and the author of Conversational UX Design: A Practitioner's Guide to the Natural Conversation Framework.LinksConversational UX Design IBM Research AlmadenMoore, Robert J. and Raphael Arar. 2019. Conversational UX Design: A Practitioner's Guide to the Natural Conversation Framework. Association for Computing Machinery, New York. DOI: 10.1145/3304087. Available at Amazon and Morgan & Claypool.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Every voice assistant needs three core components: Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR), Natural Language Understanding (NLU) and Text-to-Speech (TTS). We've already covered what Automatic Speech Recognition is and how it works with Catherine Breslin and in this episode, we're covering the latter, text-to-speech.To guide us through the ins and outs of TTS, we're joined by Niclas Bergström, a TTS veteran and co-founder of one of the largest TTS companies on the planet, Readspeaker.Text-to-speech is the technology that gives voice assistants a voice. It's the thing that produces the synthetic vocal sound that's played from your smart speaker or phone whenever Alexa or Siri speaks. It's the only part of a voice assistant that you'd recognise. The other core components, ASR and NLU, are silent.And, given how we're hard wired for speech - a baby can recognise its mother's voice from the womb - how your voice assistant or voice user interface (VUI) sounds is one of the most important parts of it.A voice communicates so much information without us necessarily being aware. Just from the sound of someone's voice, you can infer gender, age, mood, education, place of birth and social status. From the sound of someone's voice, you can decide whether you trust them.With voice assistants, voice user interfaces, or any hardware or software that speaks, choosing the right voice is imperative.Some companies decide on a stock voice. One of Readspeaker's 90 voices or perhaps Amazon Polly. Others create their own bespoke voice that's fit for their brand.We see examples of Lyrbird's voice cloning and we hear Alexa speak every day, so it's easy to take talking computers for granted. Because speaking is natural and easy for us, we assume that it's natural and easy for machines to talk. But it isn't.So in this episode, we're going to lift the curtain on text-to-speech and find out just exactly how it works. We'll look at what's happening under the hood when voice assistants talk and see what goes into creating a TTS system.Readspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services for IVR systems, voice applications, automobiles, robots, public service announcement systems, websites or anywhere else. It's been in the TTS game for over 20 years and has in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.LinksVisit Readspeaker.com to find out more about TTS servicesAnd Readspeaker.ai for more information on TTS research and samples See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
This week's top stories:Google’s Read Along Vernacular.ai raises $5.1 million led by Exfinity Ventures, Kalaari CapitalHR AI system, Paradox AI gets 40m funding for replacing the ‘boring’ jobsConverseNow has closed a $3.25 million seed funding round led by Bala InvestmentsOmilia, a conversational artificial intelligence platform developer, has raised $20 million in a funding round led by Grafton CapitalGetting the tone right - automated copy generation has to be retrained in a time of crisisStores may use voice assistants to transform shopping, retail consultant saysIn a world fearful of touch, voice assistants like Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri are making our lives easierStartup adjusts medical voice assistant for a Zoom worldFrance launches AI voice assistant to help coronavirus patientsKaty Perry announces new album on AlexaSpirent approved to test AVS productsHow speech recognition techniques are helping to predict volcanoes’ behaviourThe Information by James GleikMIDI SproutLearn guitar on Google Assistant See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Music has been the top use case on smart speakers pretty much from the beginning. Having any song you like at your beckoning call makes playing music around the house easier than ever. And households that play music out loud are, apparently, happier households. It doesn't require too much thought, either. So, discoverability isn't as much of a challenge as with skills, actions and services. If you want to play some Michael Jackson, just ask. Having said that, music consumption habits are advancing. According to Pandora, more people are listening to up-beat, exercise music during lockdown, presumably to exercise to given the gyms are shut. And more people are listening to more ambient music, too, as well as child friendly playlists. People spending time at home and using their music service to relax and entertain the kids respectively. And there's a growing trend moving away from listening to artists and towards listening to playlists. Random compilations of different tunes grouped around a theme. And with smart speakers, we're seeing an insight into people's contexts with the music they ask to play. For example 'play BBQ music' might not be something you'd try and find on Spotify, but you might ask for it from your smart speaker. In the age of playlists, mood music and music on demand, how does a record label make sure that its catalogue of music is found and played on smart speakers? Well, that's what we're going to find out in this episode. In this episode: voice strategy at Sony MusicWe're joined by Dennis Kooker, President, Global Digital Business and US Sales, and Achim Matthes, Vice President, Partner Development, at Sony Music Entertainment. Dennis and Achim walk us through how Sony Music is thinking about voice, some of the behavioural trends they're seeing play out, how they make sure that, when you ask for a Sony Artist song, you get what you've asked for, what's involved in music discoverability, what trends they're seeing and where they see music and voice heading in future.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Stories covered:Talking elevators and the Scottish elevator sketchContact centre voice biometricsGoogle Assistant's voice matchFacebook Chatbot, Blender, can talk about anything. See some sample dialogues and try it out.Juniper researchNPR Smart Audio ReportPandora's listening habit changesAI conference on Aminal FarmClaire Mitchell on VUX World See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Dustin and Kane are joined by Patricia Scanlon, CEO SoapBox Labs, to discuss how its specialist speech technology for kids is being used and scaled across the globe to help kids learn to read and more.In this episode: voice tech for kidsImagine being able to have your child read to an iPad and have it tell them how they’re doing. Whether they’re pronouncing the words right and encouraging them to improve.Imagine, as a parent or teacher, being able to report on different child’s progress so that you can focus on the real areas that need improving.Well, this is what Soapbox Labs enables you to do with its specialist speech technology which you can use to build bespoke applications specifically for kids.You might be wondering 'why would I need speech technology specifically for kids?' Well, kids have totally different voices to adults. Their pitch is higher, they don't always pronounce words properly and it changes across the ages. A 5 year old's voice is different to a 10 year old's voice. Most of the speech recognition systems you'll be familiar with are trained on adult voices and don't tend to work too well for kids voices. In this episode, we expand on this and more with a deep discussion on just why voice technology for kids is so important, how the solution was created, what makes it unique and how you can use it to create life changing applications that help kids all over the world learn and entertain themselves. We discuss use cases in education, such as learning to read or learning a new language, as well as leisure, such as speech recognition in toys.After listening or watching this episode, you'll not only be equipped with the knowledge you need to create effective voice applications for kids, you'll also have a new appreciation for just how important this kind of technology is, what kind of opportunity exists in creation educational solutions for kids, but also just how important all of this is. About Patricia ScanlonPatricia Scanlon is the founder and CEO of SoapBox Labs, the award winning voice tech for kids company. Patricia holds a PhD and has over 20 years experience working in speech recognition technology, including at Bell Labs and IBM.Patricia has been granted 3 patents, with two pending. She is an acclaimed TEDx speaker, and in 2018 was named one of Forbes "Top 50 Women in Tech" globally.In 2013, inspired by the needs of her oldest child, Patricia envisioned a speech technology to redefine how children acquire literacy. She has successfully raised multiple rounds of both public and private funding to bolster research and product development, and her technical approach has been independently validated by the world's top three academic authorities on speech recognition.SoapBox Labs is based in Dublin and has a world class team of 22 employees.LinksGet a free 90 trial of the SoapBox Labs API:Visit soapboxlabs.comEmail hello@soapboxlabs.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Deborah Harrison was the very first writer on the Cortana team and defined the personality of Microsoft's digital assistant that is used on over 400m surfaces globally.In this talk, we chat to Deborah about the importance of personality and persona in conversational experiences, and the critical responsibility of ethical design.LinksFollow Deborah on Twitter See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Voice search is growing. As smart speaker adoption increases and people use the voice assistants on their phones more and more, voice is playing an increasing role in more customer journeys.But what's your share of voice? How often does your company 'rank' for the search terms you'd like to rank for?Amazon and Google are tight-lipped about voice search volumes and don't offer any way of tracking voice search performance for websites, skills or actions.Thankfully, Andy Headington and his team at Adido, has created a tool that lets you do just that.In this episode, we speak to Andy about how you can measure your share of voice, and how you can find ways of identifying insights that will enable you to improve you voice search performance.LinksTry Share of Voice  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is speech recognition and how does it work?Automatics speech recognition (also known as ASR) is a suite of technology that takes audio signals containing speech, analysis it and converts it into text so that it can be read and understood by humans and machines. It's the technology that makes voice assistants like Amazon Alexa able to understand what a user says.There's obviously a whole lot more to it that than, though. So, in today's episode, we're speaking to one of the most knowledgable and experienced speech recognition minds the world has to offer, Catherine Breslin, about just exactly what's going on under the hood of automatic speech recognition technology and how it actually works.Catherine Breslin studied speech recognition at Cambridge, before working on speech recognition systems at Toshiba and eventually on the Amazon Alexa speech recognition team where she met the Godfather of Alexa, Jeff Adams. Catherine then joined Jeff at Cobalt Speech where she currently creates bespoke speech recognition systems and voice assistants for organisations.In this episode, you'll learn how one of the fundamental voice technologies works, from beginning to end. This will give you a rounded understanding of automatic speech recognition technology so that, when you're working on voice applications and conversational interfaces, you'll at least know how it's working and then be able to vet speech recognition systems appropriately.Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vux See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Voice shopping on Alexa and Google Assistant smart speakers is a $2bn market today, and is forecast to explode. I've wrote about the potential of voice shopping for the Harvard Business Review last year, but things are starting to pick up.According Amazon's Patrick Gauthier, 20% of Americans are ready for voice shopping now, and 39% of all Americans will complete some part of their purchase journey via voice by 2022.And while it might not generate a huge percentage of sales today, the learnings that you'll gather through observing and collecting data on how customers are interacting with your brand, will be worth its weight in gold when the volcano erupts. Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vuxIntroducing Shilp Agarwal, CEO, BlutagOur guest today is Shilp Agarwal, serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Blutag, the voice shopping platform making it possible for retailers to sell on Alexa and Google Assistant with ease. Shilp talks us through how he sees the voice shopping landscape today, how it's changed over the last two years, and why it's going to explode in the next 18 months.Some highlights for retailers considering Alexa for voice shoppingSelling via Alexa skills can have an ROI and offer some key learnings. Fresh Direct increased its shopping cart size by 12% with its Alexa skill, powered by Blutag.But the ROI is about more than sales. You can get ahead of your competition by excelling in customer experience, offering voice options at different stages of the customer journey. From product research and consideration, through ordering and delivery tracking, right through to post-sales.And you don't need to be all things to all people straight away. Instead, try focusing on smaller parts of the shopping experience that'll help you get moving quickly, offer some value immediately and learn from your users. Things like repeat purchases or delivery checking are ideal.One thing is for sure, voice shopping is on the horizon and getting ahead now will put you in a great position.LinksVisit blu.ai  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Corona virus hits voice as Google removes coronavirus actions, Spotify looks like it's releasing a voice assistant and Jovo lets you build voice assistants everywhere.Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vuxStories discussed in this episodeGoogle reject corona virus actionSpotify might be releasing a voice assistantJovo v3, build voice assistants and deploy them everywhereJovo Linkedin vlog Google Read ItGoogle Read It Linkedin vlogAlexa, the OSLive broadcasting on Alexa with the Food NetworkThe end of Alexa Skills?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Food Network aims to the be Peloton of cooking with live video broadcasting on Alexa. Director of Technology and Emerging Platforms at Discovery Inc., Tim McElreath, joins us to share how.Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vuxLive video broadcasting on AlexaThe Food Network are working closely with Amazon to build out features for live video broadcasting on Echo Show devices and aims to be the Peloton of cooking.Tim McElreath shares the story of what the Food Network is up to and how they see voice assistants such as Amazon Alexa shaping the future of engagement and content distribution in future. Through the Food Network app, you can pay a subscription to access premium content such as in-app live interactive cooking shows. This is what Tim is bringing to Alexa. Live cooking demonstrations with the ability for the audience to ask questions to Alexa and have those questions fed through to the presenter to be answered live.We also discuss the process of making live broadcasting happen and how it's being built as first party functionality. That means that the Food Network aren't building a skill for this. Instead, they're sending a feed and metadata to Amazon for Alexa to distribute it directly. Is this a sign of the future? Moving away from skills and towards feeding Alexa content with metadata directly?The Food Network aims to own the kitchen and Alexa is a big part of that. This episode will show you how Tim and his team are pursuing such goals and will have you thinking about how you can do the same.LinksTry the Food Network skill (US only)Connect with Tim on Twitter  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Jon Bloom, Senior Conversation Designer at Google, joins us to share what a conversation designer does at Google, as well as some conversation design techniques used at Google, such as 'grounding strategies'. Presented by SparksSparks is a new podcast player app that lets you learn and retain knowledge while you listen.The Sparks team are looking for people just like you: podcast listeners who're also innovative early adopters of new tech, to try the beta app and provide feedback.Try it now at sparksapp.io/vux Conversation design and grounding strategiesConversation design is one of the core skillsets required to create engaging and effective voice and conversational experiences. UX Mag recently wrote about how the role of conversation designer will be one of the fastest growing UX roles in 2020.But what exactly is conversation design? And what does a conversation designer actually do?This week, we're joined by Jon Bloom, Senior Conversation Designer at Google to find out.We discuss the role, what's involved, Jon's prior experience, the resurgence of enthusiasm in the voice community, as well as some conversation design techniques you can use to start creating engaging conversational experiences.Conversation design techniquesOne of the highlights of the conversation is Jon's take on errors.Within the conversation design community, most people talk about 'error recovery', which is recovering from situations in a conversation where things go wrong. For example, if a user asks for a pizza, and the system says 'what flavour', what happens when the user says a flavour that the system doesn't have? Or if the system mishears the user?Recovering from these situations is typically known as 'error recover', but Jon's perspective is different and refreshing.Jon mentioned that within all conversations, there are no such thing as errors. There is simply 'grounding'.Grounding includes anything and everything the two people do within a natural conversation in order to ensure understanding.For example, if a user asks for a hotel room for Tuesday, the system might confirm with 'Here's the rooms I found for Tuesday'. Confirming that it heard Tuesday is a form of grounding.In the pizza example, where the user asks for a flavour the system doesn't have, the system might respond with 'I'm sorry, we don't have Hawaiian, but we do have farmhouse'.These aren't 'errors', they're natural parts of human conversations and the things we do to ensure both parties are on the same page.We get into some great detail on this with Jon, as well as plenty more conversation design techniques.About Jon BloomJon is a veteran in the conversation design space, with decades of experience working in speech recognition systems, conversational UX and natural language-based human-computer interaction.He created the interface design process for the well renowned dictation system Dragon Dictation by Dragon Systems, before moving to SpeechWorks (acquired by Nuance) to work on conversation design for IVR phone systems and in-car speech recognition systems.Jon then worked at Synchronoss Technologies working on analysing and improving speech recognition systems for IVR phone systems, then moved back to Nuance as a Senior User Interface Manager.Jon currently works predominantly on the Google Assistant and is responsible for making interactions and experiences on Google Assistant as intuitive and as user friendly as possible.LinksFollow Jon on TwitterDesigning Voice User Interfaces by Cathy PearlVoice User Interface Design by James GiangolaGoogle's conversation design guidelinesGoogle's 'error' recovery guidelines (The irony isn't lost on me that Google has called this 'errors', rather than 'grounding'. Although this does include genuine system errors such as speech recognition issues) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Maaike Coppens returns to share how you can go from zero to hero in one voice design sprint. From nothing at the beginning to a a validated use case and prototype at the end, with fun in the middle. Presented by ReadspeakerReadspeaker is a pioneering voice technology company that provides lifelike Text to Speech (TTS) services.Whether you're needing a TTS voice for your IVR system, voice application, automobile, robot, public service announcement system, website or anywhere else, Readspeaker have you covered.They've been in the TTS game for over 20 years and have in-depth knowledge and experience in AI and Deep Neural Networks, which they put to work in creating custom TTS voices for the world's biggest brands.If you're in the market for any form of TTS technology, check out Readspeaker today.In this episodeYou can't design conversations without having them. This is Maaike's core message, and it's true. That's why the voice design sprint was born. Taken from the core principles behind the book, Sprint, by Google's Jake Knapp, and the Google voice sprint methodology, Maaike has adapted and created a version of the design sprint that's perfect for voice. Everyone speaks differently and approaches a conversation from a different starting point. The art of conversation design is to create an experience that works for all and is personalised where it needs to be. However, sometimes we're limited by the technology we're working with. For people who're new to conversation design or voice design, it's often thought that conversations with voice assistants just happen and that the sky is the limit. You know, because the 'AI' will handle everything. In reality, that's not the case and there's a certain amount of education and grounding required to show the limitations of the technology and what a realistic conversation looks like. Enter the voice design sprintThrough a series of 'serious games' and interactive exercises, that's exactly what this voice design sprint does. In this episode, Maaike takes us through the voice design sprint workshop format and runs through the exercises so that you can try them in your own voice design sprints.LinksJoin Maaike on LinkedInMaaike's websiteDesign sprint websiteSprint by Jake KnappThe Google Voice Design SprintTranscreating voice experiences with Maaike CoppensGrice's Maxims See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store