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Vox Conversations

Vox Conversations

Author: Vox

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Vox Conversations brings you weekly discussions between the brightest minds and the deepest thinkers; conversations that will cause you to question old assumptions and think about the world and our role in it in a new light, including five years' worth of episodes hosted by Vox co-founder Ezra Klein.

417 Episodes
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Vox environmental reporter Benji Jones talks with journalist and author Michelle Nijhuis about her book Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction. They talk about the history of the conservation movement and its many characters, the standout successes and ugly truths, and why, even with millions of species under threat, there's still reason to hope. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Climate writer and Vox contributor David Roberts talks with Jessika Trancik, Associate Professor at the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society at M.I.T. They discuss many aspects of the vast undertaking to remake our world in response to the realities of climate change. They survey the technologies and innovations that are being deployed in this effort, and talk about what sorts of policy initiatives would be best-suited for the road ahead. While we might feel like our future will be full of sacrifices we're asked to make, Trancik explains that now is the time to shape a world in which we could live more equitably, efficiently, and comfortably. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Writer and Vox contributor Anne Helen Petersen talks with poet and novelist Patricia Lockwood about the experience of being extremely online. They discuss Lockwood's book No One Is Talking About This, writing and religious upbringing, the parts of life perfectly suited to the internet, and the human experiences that glitch the system. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox's Worldly host Zack Beauchamp talks with author and New Statesman editor Emily Tamkin about the life and legacy of George Soros. How did a Hungarian billionaire philanthropist become the No. 1 boogeyman of right-wing nationalist movements on both sides of the Atlantic? They unpack the meaning of the smear campaign against him, and the inherent contradictions of a wealthy man trying to use his influence to make societies more democratic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Unexplainable is a new podcast from Vox about everything we don’t know. Each week, the team look at the most fascinating unanswered questions in science and the mind-bending ways scientists are trying to answer them. New episodes drop every Wednesday.  Learn more: vox.com/unexplainable  Listen on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/unexplainable/id1554578197 Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0PhoePNItwrXBnmAEZgYmt?si=Y3-2TFfDT8qHkfxMjrJL2g Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aarti Shahani, NPR journalist and host of WBEZ podcast Art of Power, talks with investigative journalist and author Alfredo Corchado about the US-Mexico border. Trump's actions created a new urgency for the political establishment to better understand the border, and Biden's challenges there continue to grow. Corchado, a former child farmworker and a Mexican-American with identities on both sides of the border wall, discusses the reality, politics, history, and future of the border. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox's Sigal Samuel talks with the author of Wintering, Katherine May, about the lessons we can learn during life's darkest seasons. They talk about our long collective pandemic winter, about how times of retreat can allow for personal and political transformation, and about how we might carry new wisdom with us as we emerge into spring. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox's Sean Illing talks with the author of The Sum of Us, Heather McGhee, about the costs of racism in America — for everyone. They discuss what we all lose by buying into the zero-sum paradigm that progress for some has to come at the expense of others, and why the left needs to reframe the country's race problem and persuade the other side with a more compelling story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Who owns the Western?

Who owns the Western?

2021-03-0451:413

Vox book critic Constance Grady talks with Vox gender identities reporter and novelist Anna North about Anna's new book Outlawed. They discuss creating an alternative history, reimagining the Western, and having fun with the usually fraught topics of gender and identity. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Undefeated's culture critic Soraya Nadia McDonald talks with Emmy Award-winning television writer and producer Cord Jefferson. They discuss the transition from journalism to TV, delving into Jefferson's move from Gawker to writing for hit shows like Succession, The Good Place, and Watchmen. They also touch on what needs to change about TV writer's rooms, and what our current era of streaming giants and tech barons means for news and pop culture. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox's Sean Illing talks about the the little-known history of psychedelics and spirituality in the Western world with Brian Muraresku, author of The Immortality Key. What role did psychedelic drugs play in the rise and spread of Christianity — and could they save the church today? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
NPR journalist, memoirist, and host of the upcoming WBEZ podcast The Art of Power Aarti Shahani talks with Cecilia Muñoz, a former aide to Obama and part of Biden's transition team. It's a conversation about immigration policy reform and the challenges ahead for President Biden — and for a country wrestling with changing demographics, racism, and its history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox's Dylan Matthews talks with author and Revolutions podcaster Mike Duncan about what history can tell us about the insurrection at the US Capitol. Is America experiencing a true moment of revolution? So many republics throughout history have crumbled - could this one be next? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox's Sean Illing talks to Yale professor and author Jason Stanley about why American democracy provides such fertile soil for fascism, how Donald Trump demonstrated how easy it was for our country to flirt with a fascist future and what we can do about it. Correction 2/1: Professor Stanley suggested in this conversation that West Virginia declined to expand the Medicaid option in 2013. In fact, the state did expand the program and has gradually added enrollment since 2013. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Joe Biden experience

The Joe Biden experience

2021-01-2501:05:365

Ezra Klein is joined by Evan Osnos, a staff writer at the New Yorker and the author of Joe Biden: The Life, the Run, and What Matters Now to discuss our new president. President Biden has been in national politics for almost five decades. And so, people tend to understand the era of Joe Biden they encountered first — the centrist Senate dealmaker, or the overconfident foreign policy hand, or the meme-able vice president, or the grieving, grave father. But Biden, more so than most politicians, changes. And it’s how he changes, and why, that’s key to understanding his campaign, and his likely presidency.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Vox columnist Anne Helen Petersen talks with sociologist Rachel Sherman about her research into the anxieties of wealthy people and their desire to be seen as "middle class." Sherman's work exposes the flawed stories we tell ourselves about who qualifies as middle class and who qualifies as "good" in the US. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Recode’s Peter Kafka speaks with New York Times’s Tech columnist Kevin Roose about big tech’s power and responsibility - and whether it is going to have accountability. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
New York magazine's Washington correspondent Olivia Nuzzi spent the past four years covering the Trump White House. In this inaugural episode of Vox Conversations, Nuzzi talks to guest host Sam Sanders, host of NPR's It’s Been a Minute, about the perils of anonymous sourcing, some unexpected job hazards (self-loathing), and why Trump didn’t ultimately create, but instead activated, the crowd of insurgents that breached the Capitol last week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
How do you feel right now? Excited to listen to your favorite podcast? Anxious about the state of American politics? Annoyed by my use of rhetorical questions? These questions seem pretty straightforward. But as my guest today, psychologist Lisa Feldman Barrett, points out there is a lot more to emotion than meets the mind. Barrett is a superstar in her field. She’s a professor of psychology at Northeastern University, holds appointments at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, and has received various prestigious awards for her pioneering research on emotion. Her most recent book How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain argues that emotions are not biologically hardwired into our brains but constructed by our minds. In other words, we don’t merely feel emotions — we actively create them. Barrett’s work has potentially radical implications. If we take her theory seriously, it follows that the ways we think about our daily emotional states, diagnose illnesses, interact with friends, raise our children, and experience reality all need some serious adjusting, if not complete rethinking. If you enjoyed this episode, you should check out: A mind-expanding conversation with Michael Pollan The cognitive cost of poverty (with Sendhil Mullainathan) Will Storr on why you are not yourself  A mind-bending, reality-warping conversation with John Higgs Book recommendations:  Naming the Mind by Kurt Danzinger  The Island of Knowledge by Marcelo Gleiser  The Accidental Species by Henry Gee Sense and Nonsense by Kevin L. Laland Credits: Producer and Editor - Jeff Geld Researcher - Roge Karma Recording engineer - Cynthia Gil Field engineer - Joseph Fridman The Ezra Klein Show is a production of the Vox Media Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
You often hear that eating animals is natural. And it is. But not the way we do it. The industrial animal agriculture system is a technological marvel. It relies on engineering broiler chickens that grow almost seven times as quickly as they would naturally, and that could never survive in the wild. It relies on pumping a majority of all the antibiotics used in the United States into farm animals to stop the die-offs that overcrowding would otherwise cause. A list like this could go on endlessly, but the point is simple: Industrial animal agriculture is not a natural food system. It is a triumph of engineering. But though we live in a moment when technology has made animal cruelty possible on a scale never imagined in human history, we also live in a moment when technology may be about to make animal cruelty unnecessary. And nothing changes a society’s values as quickly as innovations that make a new moral system easy and cheap to adopt. And that’s what this podcast is about. Bruce Friedrich is the head of the Good Food Institute, which invests, connects, advises, and advocates for the plant and cell-based meat industries. That work puts him at the hot center of one of the most exciting and important technological stories of our age: the possible replacement of a cruel, environmentally unsustainable form of food production with a system that’s better for the planet, better for animals, and better for our health. I talk a lot about animal suffering issues on this podcast, and I do so because they’re important. We’re causing a lot of suffering right now. But I don’t believe that it’ll be a change in morality or ideology that transforms our system. I think it’ll be a change in technology, and Friedrich knows better than just about anyone else alive how fast that technology is becoming a reality. In a rare change of pace for the Ezra Klein Show, this conversation will leave you, dare I say it, optimistic. Book Recommendations: Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism by Melanie Joy Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World by Paul Shapiro Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (207)

Jim Loar

@26:10 ...The perfect answer to the modern statement "...the science is settled...."

Apr 12th
Reply

Mark Saltiel

Really interesting conversation. Worthy of multiple listens to get it all. Thank you.

Mar 12th
Reply

gina carpenter

what an interesting podcast! I am an atheist, former evangelical christian and raised morman, and realize civilization cannot escape religion. This helps me understand how humans can believe such "fairy tales". No disrespect intended.

Mar 8th
Reply

Susie Claire PH

Amazing interview!! Finally Trump and the current actions by the GOP make sense.

Feb 2nd
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Sya Oberhausen

"Donald Trump" is a reality TV persona. Fascism isn't an redneck ideology but a State System. Social sciences Zumm kotzen! 🤖

Jan 28th
Reply

Christopher Greggs

Love the content of this feed! The engineering on this is lacking. Running this podcast through some light audio repair to remove mouth clicks, harsh sibilance via de-essing, etc would do wonders for the production value. The absence of these makes the recording a little hard to listen to because of the harsh frequencies. I know i'm being "that guy" but 15 minutes of some blanket audio repair would go a long way. Keep the great content coming!. Big fan.

Jan 28th
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Philly Burbs

Why is everyone forgetting to mention GOOGLE? The social media platforms followed Google's models. All they have to do is change analytics. Right now we only see & read people we agree with. Originally, we saw both.

Jan 18th
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Chrissie Knowles Morris

Really enjoyed it, I love Ezra too but this has maintained the nice conversational style and I enjoyed the host and the guest so, good stuff really 😊

Jan 18th
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Paulo Lavigne

Ezra is a great host, but you know what? Sam Sanders is even better! Sam sounds calmer and doesn't talk like a machine gun, as Ezra does. Lol. Besides, he gives the guest more airtime.

Jan 17th
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James Loar

@06:07. .... or Latinos saw through the false left / media narrative and voted the issues that were important to them. It seems easier to see why their vote shifted if you stop prefixing everything as racist, it seems a big group ust didn't believe you.

Dec 21st
Reply

Juned Shaikh

wonderful and enlightening conversation. "learned helplessness" is very easily identifiable in super destitutes around us.

Dec 12th
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Tom Rooney

This is the kind of opinion journalism that's turning me into a conservative. Why can't we wait for the legal process to play out? Why do we fulminate before the election is certified? Democrats 2016: Trump colluded with Russia to steal the election! Democrats 2020: How dare you question the integrity of the election!

Nov 12th
Reply (1)

dp

its right wing media, radio, tv and social media sowing misinformation and bile.

Nov 12th
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Yasmine C

F* that guy. F all pollsters.

Nov 7th
Reply

Sasha Anne Lyn

I think tou have to know that most of the rest of the planet is shocked that still so many Americans voted for that man, that party; it is unfathomable.

Nov 5th
Reply

LINDSEY GRAFF

Nate Silver says the word "right" far far far too much. Otherwise I really enjoyed the episode 🙂

Nov 1st
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zac wallace

I don't think she understands evolution. I was also surprised to hear her step into an appeal to ignorance. Pathetic.

Oct 31st
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dp

these are predominantly wish lists and fun mental exercises, but have zero chance of being implemented in a polarized political climate. The only real workable solution is to limit terms of Justices to 10 years, and, legislate mandatory retirement age of all Federal Employees, including Judges, Senators and Congresspeople at 75. Courts would have more turnover but for both parties, and would produce more people into the system, who bring more current experiences. 85 year olds almost all have cognitive declines and should not continue to serve as decision makers in a multigenerational, multi cultural, rapidly changing, society.

Oct 25th
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Sean Everett

1:07:42 in case my point wasn't clear what I'm trying to suggest is that if vox, like thousands of other professional organizations, hires a cleaning service that employs minorities to do the actual cleaning (not talking about the office staff), then isn't Klein and every other staffer at such an organization complicit in reinforcing or contributing to an oppression-influinced baseline that leads to these kinds of assumptions that are seen as micro-aggressions?

Oct 19th
Reply

Sean Everett

1:06:48 I'm curious if vox employs a cleaning service for their offices, and (assuming they do) what the racial makeup of that cleaning service is on terms of who is actually doing the weekly cleaning. let's further assume minorities do the actual cleaning. in which case someone would be reasonable in assuming the cleaning staff would be minority. what do we do about this? surely reality (the fact that "the help" is most often minority) and not racism is primarily the reason for such assumptions. if you change the reality you remove the basis for assumption. but how do you change it? quotas for cleaning companies?

Oct 19th
Reply
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