DiscoverWSJ’s The Future of Everything
WSJ’s The Future of Everything
Claim Ownership

WSJ’s The Future of Everything

Author: The Wall Street Journal

Subscribed: 102,995Played: 496,192
Share

Description

Discover what comes next with this in-depth look at how science and technology are revolutionizing the way we live, work and play. Join our award-winning team of journalists as we crisscross the country to interview the leaders and luminaries reshaping our world.
60 Episodes
Reverse
The coronavirus pandemic led to blood-donation shortages across the world, outlining the fragility of the pipeline. That has brought fresh urgency to research that has been decades in the making but is only now starting to become a reality: The production of artificial blood. Last year, researchers began a pioneering clinical trial, and more are on the way, bringing us closer to a world where blood factories augment supplies.
What if we could alert whales to stay away from oil spills? Or hear from dolphins directly when they want treats? Seamless conversation between animals and humans is still a far-off goal. But scientists think that machine-learning tools could open the door to communication with marine mammals. Listen to the first part of this two-part series, Google AI Tries to Save the Whales.
In the Pacific Northwest, an increase in shipping traffic is further threatening the orca population, which has already seen its numbers drop in the face of food shortages and climate change. One of the biggest threats from the boats is noise pollution, which interferes with the whales' ability to communicate. Engineers at a unit of Google may have an answer: An alert system that relies on artificial intelligence.
The America's Cup, the world's oldest sailing competition, has a reputation for fostering innovation. In 2013, contestants began to use hydrofoils-underwater wings on the hull-to lift their boats out of the water during the race, allowing them to reach highway speeds and revolutionizing the sport. An Olympic sailor and a billionaire oil trader are now reimagining the technology to make passenger ferries faster and more eco-friendly.
In recent weeks, protests have erupted in response to police violence against citizens - specifically communities of color - forcing departments to reconsider how officers do their jobs. Police forces have been using tech - like Tasers and body cameras - to try and reduce the use of lethal force and improve accountability. In this episode, we'll explore how emerging technology - like virtual reality training - could improve police training by boosting empathy and tackling racial bias.
The tiny, flying creatures carry all sorts of viruses but don't get sick. How do they do that? We meet the researchers who are mapping bat genomes and studying the animal's ability to fend off inflammation. What they find could help humans better combat the next pandemic. Special thanks to Bradley Klein for allowing us to use his bat call sounds. He's given bat walks in New York's Central Park and surrounding areas for more than a decade.
Research on a vaccine for the new coronavirus is progressing swiftly because of the legacy of scientists working on past diseases. Some of society's most devastating viruses ended up improving the way we study illness and search for cures. We explore the thread that connects research on polio and the new virus, SARS-CoV-2, and consider whether the pandemic will inform future generations of virologists.
Viruses are ubiquitous, found in every crevice on earth. Some, like SARS CoV 2, can end up killing their hosts. But researchers credit ancient viruses with helping us form long term memories. As parts of the world reopen for business, we consider how these little packets of genetic material are not just our enemy, but helped us to evolve. Viruses, it turns out, shaped our genome, and will like be part of our evolutionary future.
Artificial Intelligence can speed up research and improve accuracy. Those qualities are also key to suppressing the spread of Covid-19. With the globe clamoring for solutions to the pandemic, institutions, governments, universities and startups are turning to AI to shave precious time off the quest for a Covid-19 cure.
The market for hemp-based CBD products is exploding. And China wants in on the potential profits. But CBD is highly regulated in China, and THC is illegal. Will China make room for this lucrative product?
The nature of work is evolving. Technology is already an integral part of most jobs, but new developments are changing the way we navigate the workplace. From hiring managers using artificial intelligence and virtual reality, to apps that help workers find their way through maze-like mega offices, the office of tomorrow is already being tested. And lots of people are wondering if technological advancements will keep them working forever.
The clues to heredity hidden in our DNA have long been the purview of scientists. But in recent years, commercial DNA tests have made unlocking those secrets cheaper and easily accessible for millions of people. While most just find out about their ancestry, for some, the tests have opened Pandora's box. WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus introduces us to three different stories of DNA tests with unexpected consequences.
For the past few decades, governments in earthquake-prone regions have built up early warning systems. Now, private tech companies are getting into the earthquake business. (Reporters Daniela Hernandez and Robbie Whelan)
The global videogame industry is worth an estimated $150 billion-and it's rapidly growing and evolving. As part of the WSJ Tech Live conference, columnist Jason Gay spoke with Andrew Wilson, chief executive of Electronic Arts, the maker of 'Apex Legends,' 'Need for Speed,' 'FIFA' and 'The Sims,' about how esports, mobile gaming on social networks and mixed-reality games are changing the way people play.
Artificial intelligence has been compared to electricity, meaning that it will soon be integral to the world as we know it. There's an arms race for global dominance in AI, especially between the U.S. and China. But what do experts in the field have to say? Where are they optimistic, where do they see challenges-and where are they raising red flags?
What will keep the engine of tech innovation running in an era of skeptical users and wary regulators? From driverless cars to outer-space colonies, two moonshot thinkers talk about their cutting-edge work and how calculated risks may spark the next giant leap for mankind.
Demand for donated organs far outstrips supply. But researchers are working to remedy the crisis using everything from gene-edited pigs to 3D-printed tissue.
Advances in gene editing and DNA analysis are allowing parents unprecedented control over the traits their children will inherit. We explore the science-and ethics-behind the movement.
Vegetables engineered with the gene-editing technology Crispr are moving closer to supermarket shelves. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has decided these genetically altered foods won't require a special label. But will they curry favor with consumers?
Lyme disease is rampant on Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. MIT scientists believe that releasing genetically altered mice on the islands could curb-and even wipe out-the disease. A close look at an unprecedented environmental intervention.
loading
Comments (34)

Abdullah ÖZDEMİR

good

Aug 5th
Reply

ForexTraderNYC

informative easy 2 understand cast..

Aug 3rd
Reply

C Mi

Can these technologies be implemented into police uniforms ? To protect law enforcement from making mistakes?

Jun 5th
Reply

Meditative Potato

Unsubscribing. Ridiculously shallow and biased, no moral concerns at all about using sentient beings as vessels for human spare parts. They are not your slaves, they are individuals! What makes you think your life is worth more than theirs? At least some debate could have been carried around the bioethical side of the matter. Instead, they presented it as a marvel, above any questions. I couldn't expect more from WSJ, which gladly cheers behind ruthless and exploitative capitalism, what's left for "inferior beings", right? Long live the all Christian and compassionate american way of life!

Oct 23rd
Reply

boson96

Nothing works. This channel is broken.

Jul 22nd
Reply (1)

Maurizio Cieri

c

Jun 16th
Reply

Cam

I usually enjoy this podcast, but haven't found this episode or the last few very engaging.

Jun 11th
Reply

Matt Meshbane

not able to play anything on your channel, WSJ. Fix your shit.

Jun 7th
Reply

Dagad Miner

where has this episode gone?

Jun 2nd
Reply

CJ

Just use QR codes and problem is solved for retailers. No need to POS devices. The US needs to get with it

Apr 20th
Reply

Sam Carroll

NONE of these episodes are downloading. I've been trying for several weeks. I'm on Android, using the Castbox app. No problems with any other podcasts -- just this one.

Apr 10th
Reply (1)

Yunjing Luo

Repeat episode. Love the channel, but the new episodes have been released way too SLOW.

Mar 30th
Reply

Cam

Repeat episode.

Mar 29th
Reply

Tin Mann

i dont like these kind of stories! No injuries 4 u.s. solders! we have the CAP. to wipeout all of bad people without losing troops!

Mar 15th
Reply

Michael Parke

So SJP wants diversity in the workplace but only hires women?

Feb 15th
Reply

Lisa Lawson

10 NEON 20.18. GOD

Jan 18th
Reply

Tristan Schmitt

j'n à

Dec 29th
Reply

Cam

Going to try Ahimi this week!

Dec 9th
Reply

Eric Surprenant

Why are they even reporting on this. This is common knowledge and has been like this for years

Dec 1st
Reply

Yodit & Edgar Bordier

love the podcast. I'm hooked. I'd love the sponsor's message to vary a bit. Would add value.

Nov 30th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store