DiscoverWake Up Australia: Highlights
Wake Up Australia: Highlights
Claim Ownership

Wake Up Australia: Highlights

Author: Radio 2GB

Subscribed: 217Played: 7,186
Share

Description

Wake Up Australia: Highlights
927 Episodes
Reverse
Listen to the full show podcast with Michael McLaren.
Armistice Day November 11th

Armistice Day November 11th

2019-11-1000:13:28

Dr Karl James, Head of Military History at the Australian War Memorial, joins Michael to talk about Armistice Day… commemorated every year on 11th November to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War 1 and Germany at Compiègne, France for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War 1. Taking effect at eleven o'clock in the morning - the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" of 1918, the armistice initially expired after a period of 36 days and had to be extended several times, with a formal peace agreement was only reached when the Treaty of Versailles was signed the following year. The first Armistice Day was held at Buckingham Palace, commencing with King George V hosting a "Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic" during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day events were subsequently held in the grounds of Buckingham Palace on the morning of 11 November 1919, which included a two-minute silence as a mark of respect for those who died in the war and those left behind.  This would set the trend for a day of remembrance for decades to come.
Michael speaks with Clifford Hayes, Member of the Legislative Assembly - Sustainable Australia Party's Southern Metropolitan region Victoria, about his private members bill which proposes significant changes to the Planning and Environment Act 1987 which will give local councils more control of local planning policy and maximum building heights in their municipal districts. It responds to widespread resident concern about overdevelopment, particularly in suburban Melbourne, and the loss of resident say in the granting of planning permits, and as a result the loss of resident say in the character of their street, neighbourhood and community. The provisions of the Bill establish a much greater power for local Councils to establish and enforce maximum height limits for new developments. This will enable residents to better protect themselves from the loss of privacy caused by overlooking from high rise developments.
Listen to the full show podcast with Michael McLaren.
Listen to the full show podcast with Michael McLaren.
Listen to the full show podcast with Michael McLaren.
Michael speaks to Professor Mike Berry, Emeritus Professor at RMIT University, about his co-authored article that claims that no Australian city has a long-term vision for living sustainability.He writes, ‘International and internal migration trends have driven rapid growth in the big cities, especially Melbourne and Sydney.This has created major problems with providing adequate housing, infrastructure & services.The fundamental issue is the reluctance of urban communities and their leaders to discuss what might be sustainable populations.’‘No Australian city has a long-term vision showing how a future stabilised population might be supported with the essential resources of food, water and energy.No Australian city has faced up to the inevitable social tensions of increasing inequality between a well-served inner-urban elite and an increasingly under-resourced urban fringe.’
Listen to the full show podcast with Michael McLaren.
Listen to the full show podcast with Michael McLaren.
Michael is joined by Ian Henschke, Chief Advocate for National Seniors Australia, to talk about the initial findings of the Royal Commission into Aged Care.Death from septicaemia from untreated wounds; residents left in urine or faeces; dreadful food; a high incidence of assaults by staff and residents; common use of physical restraints and overprescribing of drugs to sedate residents - were all listed in Thursday’s interim report from Commissioners Lynelle Briggs & the late Richard Tracy."It is shameful that such a list can be produced in 21st century Australia," they wrote.
loading
Comments 
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store