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Well I Know Now

Author: Pippa Kelly

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Well I Know Now with Pippa Kelly is a podcast in which she and her guests discuss what their dementia experiences have taught them. From profound life lessons to the importance of professionals who truly understand and the joy to be found in the smallest things.

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6 Episodes
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4. Suzy Webster

4. Suzy Webster

2020-07-0139:15

Young mum Suzy Webster is quietly very strong. She has a softness about her that belies her courage and determination. Not many of us possess the generosity of spirit or wells of emotional, physical and mental strength to invite our elderly parents come and live with us, particularly when one of them has dementia. This young mum from Chepstow, ably and wisely supported by her husband Andrew, does. She never shouts about it, or judges others against the way she lives her life, she simply gets on with it with steely, dignified grace. She will kill me for writing this, but she humbles me. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
3. Sally Knocker

3. Sally Knocker

2020-06-2440:20

Sally Knocker works tirelessly to enhance the lives of older people and those with dementia. I doubt she even sees it as work because she is so naturally compassionate and empathetic. For her – as with other guests to whom I’ve spoken for this podcast – there is no them (those we are caring for or those with dementia) and us. There is just us. This ethos lies at the heart of all that Sally does. She is generous of both her time and her emotions and she is genuinely interested in other people. All other people. This wonderfully engaging woman is perfectly suited to her work which, at the moment, is on behalf of an agency that partners with other care organisations to support those with dementia to live meaningful lives. They can be found at meaningfulcarematters.com.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Chris Roberts has the most fantastic attitude to life. “Take it by the danglies,” he cajoles us all. “And run with it!”  This enviably positive approach might be because of – or despite of – his dementia, which he began to develop a decade ago when he was just 50 years old.  It’s a view that is undoubtedly strengthened by the deep love and support of Jayne, his wife of 26 years.It was a joy to talk to the couple down the line from their home in Rhuddlan, North Wales during Covid lockdown. I’ve long admired them for their wit and wisdom, their courage and powerful insights into living with Chris’s mixture of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia – with a dollop of the lung condition emphysema thrown in for good measure. “I’m just greedy,” laughs Chris. And my conversation with them didn’t disappoint.Theirs is, in fact, a love story that opens with the flighty giddiness of youth, develops into the multi-layered complexities of family life and, after taking a seismic hit in the form of early onset dementia, subsequently adapts to the devastating fall out as the pair of them mine new depths of mental and emotional strength in adversity.“Chris has always been the man I’ve loved,” Jayne told me. “But it has only been since his dementia diagnosis that I’ve seen what he is capable of”. The podcast is a must-listen for anyone interested, not only in this incurable condition, but in life, love and relationships, in honesty and trust.Useful websites: www.youngdementiauk.org; www.alzheimers.org.uk and www.dementiauk.org See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1. Nula Suchet

1. Nula Suchet

2020-06-0842:51

In my first podcast I meet the acclaimed interior designer Nula Suchet whose late husband began to develop Pick’s disease, a rare form of dementia, when he was just 57. This warm, passionate Irish woman tells me that she didn’t even know what dementia was when James first started to show symptoms. She describes how isolating it was as she struggled to look after him and her shock at the lack of support. We hear how her extraordinary love for James remained undiminished even as dementia stole him away and how she found new happiness with broadcaster and journalist John Suchet, whose late wife Bonnie also developed the condition. Nula and James’ story is told in her book The Longest Farewell and, though one of sadness and pain, it is also – wonderfully and surprisingly – one of hope.Nula’s book, The Longest Farewell, is available from www.amazon.co.uk and other useful websites are www.raredementiasupport.org, www.alzheimers.org.uk and www.dementiauk.org See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sally Knocker is passionate about dementia care. When I asked her what she knows now that she didn’t before becoming involved in the sector her answer came back loud and clear: not to see people living with dementia as different from the rest of us. This misguided approach, says Sally, lies behind all poor practice. Although I’ve come to know and admire this big-hearted, compassionate woman over the past few years, I was taken aback by her profound insight into this most complex of conditions. She is genuinely curious and interested, not merely in those with dementia, but in everyone. Her observations are fascinating. Meaningful Care Matters works with care partners to support those with dementia to live meaningful lives and can be found at meaningfulcarematters.com Other useful sites for those with dementia and their carers are www.alzheimers.org.uk and www.dementiauk.org See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In my first podcast I meet the acclaimed interior designer Nula Suchet whose late husband began to develop Pick’s disease, a rare form of dementia, when he was just 57. This warm, passionate Irish woman tells me that she didn’t even know what dementia was when James first started to show symptoms. She describes how isolating it was as she struggled to look after him and her shock at the lack of support. We hear how her extraordinary love for James remained undiminished even as dementia stole him away and how she found new happiness with broadcaster and journalist John Suchet, whose late wife Bonnie also developed the condition. Nula and James’ story is told in her book The Longest Farewell and, though one of sadness and pain, it is also – wonderfully and surprisingly – one of hope. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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