DiscoverWhat Next | Daily News and Analysis
What Next | Daily News and Analysis
Claim Ownership

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Author: Slate Podcasts

Subscribed: 1,942Played: 150,841
Share

Description

The problem with the news right now? It’s everywhere. And each day, it can feel like we’re all just mindlessly scrolling. It’s why we created What Next. This short daily show is here to help you make sense of things. When the news feels overwhelming, we’re here to help you answer: What next? Look for new episodes every weekday morning.
185 Episodes
Reverse
The Danger Around the Corner

The Danger Around the Corner

2019-08-2100:16:221

When it comes to pedestrian deaths, the Sun Belt is the most dangerous area in the country. Six of the 10 most dangerous metro areas for pedestrians are located in Florida. Nineteen of the top 20 are in the Sun Belt. How is the way we build our cities and suburbs contributing to the problem? And what can be done to try to reduce traffic deaths across the country?Guest: Angie Schmitt, writer Streetsblog USA
Activists invigorated by the Women’s March and the Me Too movement are expanding the definition of what it means to be a female political leader. Meet one woman who’s coaching them along the way. Guest: Chris Jahnke, speech coach to women working in politics. Podcast production by Samantha Lee with help from Danielle Hewitt.Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
Sarah McBride made waves at the Democratic National Convention in 2016 as the first transgender person to speak at a major party convention. Three years and many political successes later, McBride is trying to add another win to her résumé. One that would make her the first elected openly transgender state senator in America’s history.Guest: Sarah McBride, candidate for Senate District 1 in Delaware.Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
How to Avoid a Recession

How to Avoid a Recession

2019-08-1600:18:18

Did your heart skip a beat reading and hearing about all the economic news this week? Today on the show we explain just what’s happening in the markets and try to pin down why things are happening the way they are. Plus, we offer a few possible ways to stave off the worst of an economic downturn.Guest: Jordan Weissmann, Slate’s senior business and economics correspondentSlate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
This week the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong escalated, as activists effectively shut down an airport and beat up suspected imposters. Activists show no sign of letting up, even though the local government has withdrawn the extradition bill that initially sparked outcry. How could this possibly end?Guest: Yvonne Chiu, professor at the U.S. Naval War College.  Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
Another presidential primary means another trip to the Iowa State Fair. But the Democratic Party’s new rules for thinning down the field of candidates means a photo-op with a turkey leg isn’t all it used to be. Guest: Slate’s politics writer Jim Newell.
The demographics of migrants crossing the southern border of the United States have changed over the last several decades. What used to be young Mexican men seeking economic opportunity has turned into families seeking refuge from broken Central American governments.  Sonia Nazario has spent decades reporting from Honduras, a country where corruption runs rampant and gangs have become the de facto government. She says that the foreign aid that the Trump administration has cut off to Central America is the very aid that could help solve the crisis at the southern border.Guest: Sonia Nazario, journalist and author of Enrique's Journey: The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother. 
In the absence of new federal laws to address mass shootings, school safety has become a design problem. Guest host Henry Grabar asks: How are architects responding to an era of active shooter drills and bulletproof backpacks? Guest: Jenine Kotob, architectural designer at Hord Coplan Macht. Podcast production by Mary Wilson and Jayson De Leon.Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
Five years ago Wesley Bell watched as protests erupted across Ferguson in the wake of Michael Brown’s death. Bell, the son of a police officer, stood between the protestors and the police as he watched Ferguson descend into chaos. In an effort to make lasting change in the community he decided to run for public office. Seven months ago, he won.In our third and final episode revisiting Ferguson, we talk to Wesley Bell about his new role as St. Louis County’s top prosecutor and how he has decided to use his power.Guest: Wesley Bell, prosecuting attorney, St. Louis CountyListen to Parts 1 and 2 of our series, “The Worst Night” and “Questioning the Legend.”
There are two stories of what happened in Ferguson, Missouri, the day Michael Brown was shot and killed by police officer Darren Wilson: the story we heard immediately after, and the story we came to know months later.In the second part of our three-part series, we ask: If we misremember Michael Brown’s death, does that change Ferguson’s legacy?Guest: John McWhorter, writer, professor, and host of Lexicon Valley.Listen to Part 1 of our series, “The Worst Night”
loading
Comments (9)

Jeff DeForge

what was the song at the end of this episode?

Jul 26th
Reply

Jay Watson

Did he say $18!?

Jun 26th
Reply

Lori Clark

uploaded wrong episode

May 7th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

love the show but not this episode...the correspondent is possibly a better writer than a interviewee?

Apr 24th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

great episode. lots of food for thought.

Apr 23rd
Reply

Alex Mercedes

Ismail is probably right about the efficacy of reaching out to haters and other confused people. I am not Muslim but I am African American. bigotry burrows deep inside. it lives in a place that resists education and transformation. this is not to say that reaching out is pointless; rather, it only works where there a modicum of curiosity and willingness to change exists in the other side and it does very little to counterbalance the widespread systemic bigotry.

Apr 18th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

oops. Jamelle lost me when he suggested that opposition to busing equalled opposition to integration. makes me wonder how old he is. I'm a black senior citizen who was one of the first to integrate schools in the small Midwestern town where I grew up AND was vehemently opposed to busing when it started decades later. careful with your assumptions young man.

Mar 14th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

listening to this fills me with hope. what a great teacher! what a courageous and brilliant young woman!

Mar 3rd
Reply

Alex Mercedes

great program on a difficult topic. thanks

Mar 2nd
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store