DiscoverWhat Next | Daily News and Analysis
What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Author: Slate Podcasts

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The problem with the news right now? It’s everywhere. And each day, it can feel like we’re all just mindlessly scrolling. It’s why we created What Next. This short daily show is here to help you make sense of things. When the news feels overwhelming, we’re here to help you answer: What next? Look for new episodes every weekday morning.

735 Episodes
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Once an obscure legal doctrine, the practice of qualified immunity for police has drawn widespread public scrutiny in the past year. But as mainstream support for ending qualified immunity grows, police unions are amping up their opposition.  Guest: Kimberly Kindy, national investigative reporter for The Washington Post. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Virginia’s gubernatorial election is just weeks away, with former Virginia governor, Democrat Terry McAuliffe, vying against newcomer Republican Glenn Youngkin. Many polls show a slim margin between the two candidates, as they spar over issues like critical race theory and Trump’s legacy in an election seen as a bellwether for the upcoming midterm elections. Guest: Ben Paviour, state politics reporter at VPM.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Colin Powell, known as a “trailblazer” and “pathbreaker” in his military career, leaves behind a complicated legacy. The four-star general became a household name during the first Gulf War as the first Black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and later the first Black secretary of state. Thirty years after his rise to national prominence, Powell’s death has prompted reflections on the Iraq War and his role in using false intelligence to justify the U.S. invasion.   Guest: Fred Kaplan, Slate’s War Stories columnist.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
No One's Got Mail

No One's Got Mail

2021-10-1826:46

Democrats spent months fretting last year about the Postal Service and the fate of democracy. Now the Democrats are in charge. So why is the mail slowing down? And could planned changes fix what ails the Postal Service? Guest: Jacob Bogage, business reporter for the Washington Post.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Over the last month, the domain company Epik and the streaming service Twitch have fallen prey to massive-scale hacks. The hackers revealed not just email addresses, but detailed personal information too. For Twitch, it was the entire source code for their site.  But the attackers aren’t holding this data for ransom. In fact, they don’t seem to want much of anything. What’s motivating this new wave of activist hacks? And who suffers? Guest: Drew Harwell, tech reporter at the Washington Post Host: Lizzie O’Leary Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
For as glamorous as Hollywood often seems, the workers behind the scenes rarely experience the star treatment. They do everything from sound design and makeup to cinematography and lighting, and they’ve had enough with the industry’s dizzying production pace and long hours that stretch into the early morning. Motivated by shifts in the industry due to the pandemic, workers from the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees union are gearing up for a strike that could halt movie and show productions alike. Guest: Anousha Sakoui, entertainment industry writer for the Los Angeles Times.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Havana Syndrome sounds like something straight out of a spy novel: microwaves are being directed towards U.S. embassies, causing hearing loss, headaches, and in some cases, permanent brain damage. The Biden administration is taking these “anomalous health incidents” very seriously. Should we? Guest: Michael Wilner, a Senior National Security and White House Correspondent for McClatchy.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Galveston is a small island off the south east coast of Texas. It’s become a hot spot for short term rentals through start-ups like Airbnb but what the city has gained in tourism dollars, they’ve lost in actual residents.  Guest: Peter Holley is a senior editor at Texas Monthly.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The last month has seen a steady drip of leaked documents from inside Facebook, each seemingly more damning than the next. This week, the whistleblower behind the leaks revealed her identity. What motivates Frances Haugen? And can she do real damage to the social media giant? Guest: Jeff Horwitz, tech reporter at the Wall Street Journal.  Host: Lizzie O’Leary Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Congress Plays Chicken

Congress Plays Chicken

2021-10-0727:28

Congressional Republicans are forcing Democrats into a game of chicken over the debt ceiling where the stakes are the well-being of the global economy. It’s a showdown that has played out time and again since 2011, but it doesn’t have to be this way.  Guest: Jordan Weissmann, senior editor for Slate If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
You might think that the wreckage caused by COVID-19 would be enough to make the U.S. take pandemic planning seriously. But a close look at current pandemic preparedness efforts reveals that’s far from the truth. It’s not too late, though, to get ready for the next Big One - if we’re willing to make serious investments beyond fighting germs. Guest: Ed Yong, a staff writer at The Atlantic covering science. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
With the results of the 2020 census in hand, all 50 states have begun the process of redistricting. Extremely thin margins in the House of Representatives mean that this hyper-local process has big implications on the balance of power at a national scale. After aggressive Republican gerrymandering in the 2011 redistricting cycle, many Democrats came out in favor of creating non-partisan commissions to draw new voting maps. But how much of a moderating force are they really? And what happens if either side decides not to play by the commissions’ rules? Guest: Nick Riccardi, a western political writer for AP. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
As the U.S. Supreme Court begins a new session, several justices are trying to reassure the public of the court’s nonpartisanship. But, as Slate’s Dahlia Lithwick argues, when you dig into the recent decisions of the court, you’ll see it becoming steadily more political.  Guest: Dahlia Lithwick writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast Amicus. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Since 2018, internal research teams at Facebook have been studying the effect on Instagram on mental health. Their results couldn’t be more clear: Instagram is causing problems, especially for teen girls.  Why has it taken so long for their research to surface? And what can be done to improve the relationship between kids and the platform? Guest: Georgia Wells, tech reporter at the Wall Street Journal.  Host: Lizzie O’Leary Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The 2021-2022 NBA season will be underway in less than a month. The league has set strict testing and distancing rules for unvaccinated players. Largely, that strategy has worked but there are some vocal holdouts. Guest: Bomani Jones is an ESPN commentator and the host of the Right Time with Bomani Jones podcast.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Time’s Up was founded in 2018 in the wake of the #MeToo movement to fight sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the workplace. How, then, was the organization felled by accusations of a toxic work environment and close associations with abusers?  Guest: Lili Loofbourow, staff writer at Slate. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
It’s hard to imagine, but many states had a plan for how they would make tough calls about the distribution of scarce medical resources during a pandemic. As our present crisis has dragged on, and hospitals have become overwhelmed, those plans are beginning to go into effect -- with some interesting caveats.  Guest: Sheri Fink, correspondent at The New York Times.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Podcast production by Mary Wilson, Davis Land, Danielle Hewitt, Elena Schwartz, and Carmel Delshad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In the past year, twelve inmates on Rikers Island have died and it’s corrections staff has started refusing to come to work. The jail is slated for closure in 2027, but what can be done now to alleviate its problems?  Guest: Jan Ransom is a metro investigative reporter focused on criminal justice for the New York Times. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In the U.S., the PCR test is the gold standard for COVID testing. Common knowledge would have it that the test is more accurate—and therefore more effective at containing the spread of the dease—than the rapid antigen test.  What if that isn’t quite true?  Guest: Michael Mina, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health  Host: Lizzie O’Leary Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Congressional Democrats are struggling to bring together their moderate and progressive factions to pass an infrastructure bill and its gigantic sidecar, a budget plan filled with tax hikes, climate-related legislation, and social spending. With the party divided, is Biden’s agenda about to hit the skids? Guest: Jim Newell, Slate’s senior politics writer and author of the weekly newsletter, The Surge.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Comments (76)

Parsival North

The advertising is irrelevant. I am not looking for a life that matters. Stop the hospice advertising from New York.

Oct 5th
Reply

Teddy

Hi, What's next for Haiti and France? Instead of looking for US dollars to fix Haiti problems. What other countries are helping Haiti and if so how? Thank you.

Sep 22nd
Reply (1)

Parsival North

I hope full approval will help end the confusion about getting vaccinated. We need to get schools opened and maybe full approval will help.

Aug 13th
Reply

Rob Claypool

Andrew cuomo much less fredo won't get into a lick of trouble bc they are democrats...bunch of bull he should of been taken down long ago

Aug 8th
Reply (1)

Jeff Filicetti

I wonder if these morons remember Kamala Harris saying she wouldnt trust the vaccine if trump said it was safe. you fuck head liberals are the problem

Jul 22nd
Reply (1)

Chandra Powers-Wersch

I do find another facet of this story interesting that you addressed in a couple of sentences; the academic criticisms her work drew- that her work & the NYT publications were fact checked by actual historians who specialize in African American and slave history and found problematic assertions without evidence or evidence to the contrary but were ignored. These historians were asked by NYT to fact check before publication. I understand that the politics of the situation of her not getting hired are definitely real and part of the issue, but it would have been negligent to hire a journalist professor who didn't fact check their own work or deliberately ignored evidence, context, and info that was contrary to what they wanted to say. That makes for a troubling model for students and future journalists. I think a story like this would also be worth pursuing. Here's just one article I read: https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/03/06/1619-project-new-york-times-mistake-122248

Jul 20th
Reply

Dean Johnson

yup xx I can see

May 3rd
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

YES! ✊🏻✊🏿

Apr 27th
Reply

Antonio Andrade

are you serious? quite irresponsable opinions here

Apr 26th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

Dang, I never even heard of Substack! Might have to check it out... altho I probably won't because I tend to enjoy podcasts more than blogs at this point. I don't even read Reddit or Medium, and those were in my awareness long before this one. I just realized I might be an old person pretending to be younger than I actually am.

Apr 19th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

I'm in the minority (if Mary's intro assessment is correct) of people not following the trial. And, contrary to her suggestion, I am not finding it difficult to avoid. I am following proceedings selectively as an act of self-care. As a Black person in her 60s, I've followed many trials of white homicidal police officers. after a year of pandemic and insurrection my nerves can't take much more stress. thank you for an informative, fairly low key report. I feel up to date and you didn't make me cry.

Apr 12th
Reply (1)

Alex Mercedes

I will listen to this but I hate the title and titles like it. when will media tire of using negativity to trigger clicks? if the info on MI is valuable, we will gladly consume it without you scaring or alarming or depressing me first. what about non-worriers like myself: should we just pass on this episode? what does the title even mean in real terms? is it possible to calibrate "worry"?

Apr 8th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

the more I hear of the Gaetz story the less interested I am. this What Next coverage has pushed me over the edge. I am officially finished following this story.

Apr 5th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

one of the things I hate most about current era journalism is the trend toward inviting someone to speak at length on a topic without ever providing their credentials. to my mind, it's another version of fake news. I was offered no reason to put any faith in anything he said. to think of all the legitimate experts you might have chosen...but you chose this guy? because he wrote an essay?

Apr 1st
Reply

Alex Mercedes

listening to Oni Blair's passion intelligence and authenticity was inspiring. she is amazing.

Mar 31st
Reply

Maya Streamer

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Mar 18th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

I really related to this particular episode. While all the podcasters and journalists and tv news teams have spent the last year locked inside, bemoaning their boredom and loneliness and juggling home/life balance from the couch, even as they celebrate all this extra time for learning new skills or getting in touch with their inner selves... This has not been my lived experience. Not much has really changed in day-to-day Dayton, Ohio. My husband was a manager for a cell phone retail company at the start of the pandemic, and has since maneuvered into a management position with a cable company. Both places of employment considered their businesses essential, so my husband's schedule did not change one iota. The only difference he saw was when he had to respectfully kick customers out of his stores for not wearing masks -- even while offering to assist these dingdongs at the curb (he's a lot nicer than I am -- and much more foolhardy). As for me, I deliver for DoorDash, and that of course was also deemed essential, which makes a hell of a lot more sense than stupid chain retail stores remaining open. The changes I saw mostly related to restaurant lobbies closing down, which honestly has made my job so much easier! If there is any silver lining to the pandemic it's that I am able to pick up most orders via drive-thru, or at least via very streamlined procedures, and drop-offs have become so much easier because fear of infection means that 90% of the orders are marked "Leave at door" for no-contact deliveries. Our teenage daughter transferred from her local public high school to an online public high school, but she'd done a year of home school in elementary school to try it out, so the change for her was seemless. She hasn't physically seen her friends in a year but they chat via group texts and honestly they weren't a super social bunch of kids in the first place. Maybe that'll change when she gets her vaccination as well as her license next month, but I'm not anticipating her metamorphosing into a social butterfly. All of this to say, my family's work and home life didn't change much at all. We go to work, then we come home and stay put. We were never much for bars or theaters so our evenings usually consist of streaming shows / movies, playing board games, writing, doing crafts, or housework. Sometimes we burn a fire in the pit out back. Occasionally we walk around the block and do the dodge-dance when passing passing other masked neighbors out for a stroll. We have our groceries delivered, to limit the amount of time we're already exposing ourselves to possible risk. My husband KNOWS he's not an essential worker. So to be classified as one, and then to see the amount of disrespect piled onto the people forced to work outside the home... well, it's infuriating. I set my own schedule and only work during weeks we might be short on extra cash, so while the work I do delivering food is definitely essential, I wouldn't classify myself as an essential worker. And this is just US! My mom-law-is a grocery store department manager, which is essential, so she has worked this entire last year. My dad's a deacon, so he has served in a church capacity this entire last year. My dad-in-law works at a senior center, so ditto. My best friend works at a juvenile detention facility, so ditto for her. My husband's best friend works at a car dealership -- same. Everyone we know still works outside the home. There are no "bubbles" or "pods" or anything resembling this weird quarantine thing I keep hearing hearing about. I wish my family and friends were in that income bracket. Alas, we aren't even lucky enough to get the distinguished glory of calling ourselves essential. We're just bottom-tier workers. blah.

Mar 17th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

thanks for this glimpse into a unique demographic. even as I listened with gratitude and empathy, my heart sank: look at the way the officials elected to serve these people are resisting paying them better. all the more important to oust the anti-democracy elements of leadership.

Mar 15th
Reply

TJ Dogflower

When I was first starting to listen to this channel it was informative and a little more detail about what was in the news recently. but now it all seems to be about black rights and black lives. I'm tired about the whole black right and lives bologna. Time to move on

Mar 12th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

and again we see how racism complicates things that seem to have nothing to do with racism in the US. the reckoning required to fix what ails us is mind-blowing. no wonder the resistance and denial is so widespread. every little step is correctly viewed as both "progress" and "not enough".

Feb 24th
Reply
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