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What Was That Like

What Was That Like

Author: Scott Johnson

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First-hand true stories - a plane crash, a mass shooting, a bear attack, a train derailing, and more. The guest tells us exactly what happened, and answers the question, What Was That Like?
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Peekskill, New York. Angela Correa was 15 years old. She was a student at Peekskill High School, with an interest in photography as a hobby and perhaps eventually a career. On November 15, 1989, she went missing, and an area-wide search was conducted. Two days later, Angela’s body was found. She had been beaten, raped, and strangled to death. Police began an investigation, and questioned some of the other students at Angela’s school. Based on some tips, they began to question one of her fellow students, 16 year old Jeff Deskovic. After a long session with a polygraph examiner, Deskovic confessed to the murder. He was charged and convicted, and sentenced. He was in prison for 16 years. Just one problem with this story: he didn’t do it. Jeff Deskovic is my guest on the show today, and we talked about a lot of things, including why he would confess to a murder that he didn’t commit, and what it was like to be a sensitive, 17 year old boy living in prison next to violent criminals. And best of all, what he’s been able to do since he got out. Deskovic Foundation:https://www.deskovicfoundation.org/ Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/thejeffreydeskovicfoundation/ YouTube channel:https://www.youtube.com/user/deskovicfoundation/featured Twitter:https://twitter.com/DeskovicFDN Jeff’s TedX talk:https://www.deskovicfoundation.org/deskovic-tedx-talk Documentary “Convicted” on Amazon Prime: https://www.deskovicfoundation.org/deskovic-tedx-talkThis episode sponsored by Felix Gray blue-light glasses and HelloFresh, America’s #1 meal kit. Music credit:Drone in D by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200044 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Monica was divorced, and now a single mom with two little kids. She wasn’t looking for a relationship. Kevin was a nice guy, and he’d never been married. When they first met, there was a chemistry between them, but Monica was reluctant. Fortunately, Kevin was persistent. This is their story, and it’s a good reminder for all of us – when you have someone you love, be sure to appreciate the time you have with them now. Because sometimes the unexpected can change everything.
76: Gil fell off a cliff

76: Gil fell off a cliff

2021-04-0947:361

When I was a kid and even as a young adult, I had no fear of heights. I was always climbing trees, climbing all over the roof of our house, never had a second thought or any fear about it. Then, when I was 30, something happened that changed that. I fell off a ladder. You can get the full story by listening to the podcast. The thing is, what happened to me wasn’t even that bad. But imagine you’re walking along a trail, and there’s no guardrail next to it, and the other side of that trail is a 100 foot drop, which is about 30 meters, and the bottom of that is rocks. And suddenly you get too close to the edge, and you start to lose your footing. That’s what happened to Gil. This episode is sponsored in part by BetterHELP – professional counseling done online. As a What Was That Like listener, you can visit https://betterhelp.com/whatwas for 10% off your first month.  Music for this episode:We Always Thought the Future Would Be Kind of Fun by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/darkglow/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/
Today we’re talking about the concept of being alone. Many people all around the world have been recently exposed to some form of loneliness or isolation because of the worldwide Coronavirus pandemic. This problem started a little over a year ago, but for a lot of people it seems like it’s been longer than that, because they’ve had to stay at home in order to avoid getting infected.  Prime Minister Boris Johnson issued the announcement to residents of the UK, back in March of 2020, that the primary key to mitigating the spread of the virus, and eventually defeating it, was to stay home.These were the most stringent restrictions in Britain since World War 2. Very few people thought we would still be dealing with this a year later.  Being isolated at home, either by yourself or perhaps with some family members, can lead to some mental health issues. And that includes the possibility of depression. At least we have some ways to connect, using Zoom, Facetime, or some other audio/video communication. But it’s just not the same as being with people. Our guest today, Woniya, is actually pretty good at being alone. And we’re not talking about just being stuck at home. She was brought to a remote spot in the Arctic, nowhere near civilization – just a middle-of-nowhere place, and she was left there to fend for herself. She had to build her own shelter, find her own food, and somehow stay warm in the unbelievably cold Arctic winter. Woniya was a contestant on the reality show called Alone. This was Alone season 6, and it was called Alone in the Arctic. Right now, which is March of 2021, that whole season is available on Netflix. I highly recommend that you watch it, before listening to this episode. What we talk about here will make a lot more sense when you’ve seen what Woniya had to go through, and how she handled herself out there – for 73 days. I think you’ll agree with me that she’s pretty amazing. And if you want to learn some of the skills that she used to survive, click the link below for the Spring Online Gathering, and use the promo code WWTL15 for a discount off the enrollment fee (promo code expires April 1, 2021). Spring online gathering: https://academy.buckskinrevolution.com/springbrog website: www.buckskinrevolution.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJqeQWXKz7vpLnu8Sde7Xrg Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/buckskin_revolution/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Buckskin-Revolution-276888169854940/ Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/woniyabuckskinrevolution
When you’re a police officer, one of the things you learn as part of your training is that there’s no such thing as a routine encounter, or a “regular” traffic stop. In most cases, you don’t know the person you’re about to interact with, or if they have a criminal history, or how desperate they might be. My guest today, Daril, found that out the hard way. He was a rookie officer, working the morning shift on a weekend, and he wasn’t necessarily expecting anything exciting to happen. But then he unknowingly crossed paths with a career criminal who had recently escaped from prison, and that man was determined to do anything to avoid being captured.Daril's book about his police career:https://www.amazon.com/Blue-Chameleon-Life-Story-Supercop/dp/1646063252/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0 Daril's website:https://www.thebluechameleon.net/ 
Personally, I’ve never had a fear of flying. In fact, I really like it. I’m not sure if it’s the flying itself, or maybe it’s the fact that the flying just means I’m probably going somewhere to see people or have fun. But I’ve never had that feeling like “Oh…what if the plane just falls from the sky and we all die.” I don’t think I’ve ever worried about that. Which might be kind of odd, since I do have a fear of heights, but that only started after I fell off a roof. But that’s another story. And if you’re on a flight and you’re sitting next to someone who is just terrified, it doesn’t really matter if you tell them how safe it is to fly in an airplane. I mean, there are around 100,000 flights that happen every single day all around the world. There’s really nothing to be afraid of. But what if you’re on a flight…and there is actually cause for concern? Like, the pilot sees a thunderstorm ahead that you’ll be flying through, or maybe something is not working right on the plane, and he makes the announcement that the plane might be in trouble. That would probably scare most people. That’s what happened on a commercial flight from Phoenix to Dallas a couple of years ago. The pilot didn’t say what the problem was specifically, but he came over intercom and gave the passengers the instructions to brace for impact. Fortunately, the pilot was able to land the plane safely and no one was injured. But I’m guessing a few prayers went up, and some phone calls were made to loved ones. Can you imagine how happy those passengers must have been when they finally felt the wheels touch down on that runway, and they knew they were safe. My conversation today is with Matt. Matt is a licensed airplane pilot. And there was one day when he was flying a small plane, and it was just him – no passengers. He took off and got up to cruising altitude, and for a while everything seemed fine. What Matt didn’t know was…that plane would never touch down on an airport runway again.
72: Bonus episode - Q&A

72: Bonus episode - Q&A

2021-02-1945:571

If this is your first time discovering the What Was That Like podcast, you need to know that this is NOT a normal episode. On this show, each episode is usually a conversation with a regular person who has been through some type of extremely unusual situation (such as a plane crash or a mass shooting). The guest comes on the show and tells the story of what happened, first hand. Check out some of the past episodes – I think you’ll like it. But this is a bonus episode, and it’s different. A bunch of listeners called in their questions for me, and I answered them. A couple of things that came up, in case you’re interested: Photo album of homeless people getting bikes Dave Jackson’s podcast episode about his dog, Dudley Big thanks to all those who sent in their questions! We’ll do this again sometime.
Trains are a big  part of American culture, because they are really fascinating in so many ways. If you stand next to one, you realize – they are just so BIG. And they have so much power, to be able to pull all that weight. And wow, are they LOUD. Not just the sound of the engine, and the steel wheels on the track, but that horn – you can hear it even if you’re nowhere near the railroad tracks. Kids and adults of all ages are fascinated by trains. And they are fun to watch, as they rumble by. Maybe you get a wave from the engineer. It’s great entertainment, as long as everything works like it’s supposed to work. Deneen was with her two little girls one day, at a railroad crossing, watching the train go by just a few feet from the front of their car. Then she realized that something was very wrong, and that train was about to crash.
December 26, 2004. That was the day a huge earthquake happened. In fact, it’s the third-largest earthquake ever recorded, and it had the longest duration of faulting that has ever been observed – between eight and ten minutes. But there was something different about this earthquake. It happened underwater. It took place in the Indian Ocean. The epicenter was off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The result of this enormous earthquake happening under the ocean was that it created massive waves of water, up to 100 feet, or about 30 meters, high. These waves arrived without warning. More than 227,000 people woke up that morning and went through their normal routine, not realizing it was their last day to be alive. I remember when it happened. It was a Sunday, the day after Christmas. Of course it was the leading news story all over the world. I heard how the story unfolded, how the underwater earthquake happened, and the unbelievable numbers as the death toll kept rising. It was an incredible tragedy. But I was in the US, and that horrific scene was on the other side of the world. It didn’t seem real. But for my guest today, Aaron, that scene was very real. He was there.
What’s the most scared you have ever been? I’m not talking about being on a crazy roller coaster ride, or watching a scary movie. What we’re talking about on this episode is the kind of fear that just grips you, and controls you, and won’t let you think about anything else. I asked some of the listeners of this podcast that very question recently, in our private Facebook group. And at the end of this episode, you’ll be able to hear some of their answers – and there’s quite a variety. Turns out being scared can show up in our lives in a lot of different ways. And our guest today, Kira, has experienced that kind of gut-wrenching fear. She was on a downtown street, alone. It was dark, because it was 3:30 am. She was walking to work, and thought everything was okay. But she suddenly realized, she was not alone. Mentioned in this episode: the Noonlight app. It’s free for both iOS and Android, at Noonlight.com (there are paid versions with additional features). You can contact Kira at violentcrimesurvivors@gmail.com.
Alaska is home to a lot of wildlife, including bears. Dan loves the outdoors. You name just about any outdoor activity, and he has done it. Hiking, camping, boating, climbing, and his main obsession – fishing. In his time outdoors, Dan has had more than one encounter with a bear. Typically, they just run off when they see a human. But there was one day when Dan unexpectedly crossed paths with an angry grizzly bear. It was a day he’ll never forget. Music at the end of this episode is part of the song Comatose Rider, written and performed by Dan Bigley. Let’s take a walk, by the river sideFish in the basket, red dog by my sideFeels like so long ago, I was 25 years old I cannot see, through the visions in my headFeels like I’ve been for so long in my bedSeems like the more I learn, the more my life seems newAnd you’re coming into view ChorusI don’t know how I got to the top of the mountainI don’t know, but I believe that its trueI don’t know how I got to the top of the mountainBut its got something, something to do with youIts got Something to do with youIts got everything to do with youSomething to doWith you VerseWhen it feels like, the desert sun and the canyon wrenAre a million miles awayI can hear you voice inside my head, whisper its gonna be OK ChorusI don’t know, how I got to the top of the mountainI don’t know, but I believe that its trueI don’t know how I got to the top of the mountainBut its got something, something to doWith youIts got something to do with youIts got everything to do, with youSomething to doWith you… Guitar solo OutroOh, are you feeling aliveOh, are you feeling aliveOh, are you feeling aliveOh, are you feeling so alive so alive singingOh, so alive, singingOh, yes I’m feeling so alive so alive, singingOh, so aliveOh, so alive
It was an early morning in Indiana. Steven, 18 years old, was on his way home from an overnight shift at work. Around 6:30 am, he got into the first car accident of his life – a minor fender bender – and was exchanging information with the other driver. He had no idea that his second crash, a much bigger one, was about to happen. Music credit: Industrial Cinematic by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3909-industrial-cinematic License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
According to an article in Business Insider magazine, one of the most stressful jobs in the US is being a 911 dispatcher. Out of 600 listed occupations, a 911 emergency operator’s job ranked at #13 for stress levels. They’re trained to remain calm on every call, regardless of how panicked the caller might be, or what’s happening on the other end of that phone line. But what about when a call comes in, and the caller is someone you know? My conversation today is with Mariah. One day, she received a text message in which her brother, Nate, was threatening suicide. Mariah and her boyfriend immediately started driving to where Nate said he was, at the back of a local forestry. On the way, Mariah called 911 to get help – and the voice that answered “911, what is your emergency?” was a voice that she knew very well. If you are having suicidal thoughts, please call this number: 800-273-8255 anytime night or day to talk with someone. Your life is worth living.
Brandon spent 17 years working as an equestrian stuntman. But he didn’t grow up on a farm, and he didn’t spend his youth around horses. Back then, he was more interested in playing hockey. But he and his family did enjoy visiting Renaissance Fairs, and he met the right person at the right time. He got the opportunity to start learning how to be a stuntman – first working on the ground as a  “squire”, then later helping to train the horses, and eventually to work as a stunt rider. But his very first “stunt riding” experience was not what he expected. Do you have questions for Brandon? He’s in the What Was That Like private Facebook group – join us over there at WhatWasThatLike.com/facebook. You can also follow Brandon on Instagram (stickfigurehero) and Twitter (stickfigurehero).
Do you worry about your privacy on the internet? Do you ever think about how much someone could find out about you, if they wanted to? Have you wondered if your life could be destroyed, over the internet, by a stranger? Maybe you should. Monika was happy. She was a successful real estate agent. She used social media to connect with friends, and family, and clients. Just like everyone else does. But one day, without realizing it, she made a mistake. And she had no idea what was about to happen.   Photo courtesy of Margo Gray, WAFF 48 in Huntsville, Alabama Mechanolith by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4031-mechanolith License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Very few things in life could be more traumatic or horrifying than discovering a suicide. Remember how shocked we all were back in August of 2014, when police announced that legendary actor and comedian Robin Williams was found by his personal assistant, having committed suicide. There are so many factors to consider in that case, but I remember that when this happened, I kept thinking about how that person, his assistant, felt as she entered that room and discovered him on that Monday morning. She had worked with him for over 20 years, and it was more than just an employer – employee relationship. They were also close personal friends. It’s hard to imagine going through something like that. Our guest today is Liz. She has experienced this as well. But the suicide she discovered was not her boss, or just a close friend. It was her husband. Going through that would be bad enough. But for this podcast episode, Liz has even another story that is almost completely unrelated to her husband’s suicide. She’s been through a lot, and now she works trying to help people who have gone through similar tragedies. Check the links below for information on her book, and the work she’s doing. A warning: this episode contains descriptions of graphic violence against a child. It’s definitely not suitable for everyone. If you’d like to support this podcast and get access to all of the exclusive bonus episodes, you can do that at WhatWasThatLike.com/support. Special thanks to J.T. Tschirhart for doing the voiceover for the message from Levi Aron. Episode links: Dr Liz website:  https://DrLizLifeLaunch.com YouTube: https://youtu.be/yGFm6oiUdFg Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lizette.bataille.3 Dr Liz’s book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07V3N3YL5/ Leiby Kletzky Memorial Fund info:  https://patch.com/new-york/ditmaspark/leiby-kletzky-memorial-fund-b8221f9f Suicide Hotline: 800-273-8255 – available 24 hours a day, every day
Do you remember when you were young, and going through your teenage years? Didn’t time seem to go by a lot more slowly back then? All those years, waiting, and looking forward to that one big day when you’re finally out on your own. Now that was something to be excited about, right? You’d have your own car, your own place, you could come and go whenever, you could stay up as late as want, it would be like heaven on earth! Of course, now that we’re past that stage in life, we know that being out on your own and responsible for yourself is not always the paradise and freedom that we might have anticipated. My guest today, Terri, was right at that breakthrough stage. Leaving home for the first time, being on her own, even moving hundreds of miles away – it was all very exciting. But then as soon as she moved in to her new place – the very first day she was there, actually – she found out that the real world can bring with it some unexpected and horrific things. It was a day she’ll never forget. If you like the show, please consider becoming a supporter. That not only tells me you enjoy the podcast, it also means you can get access to all the other bonus episodes that are only available to patrons. There are different levels of support and all the details are at WhatWasThatLike.com/support.
Today, we have a really fun episode that is going to make you smile. My guest today is Robin, and Robin likes to have fun. She’s different. And she’s on today’s show to tell us about an experience she had – she was hired by the Oscar Mayer hot dog company to drive the Wienermobile. And I realize some people might not be familiar with the Wienermobile, especially those outside the US. What we’re talking about here is a large vehicle that is designed to look like a giant hot dog. Yes, this is an actual street-legal vehicle, 27 feet long (about 9 meters). If you’re in the US, you might be surprised some day and see one traveling on a street, right there in your city. And while this kind of vehicle seems like it would be unique, there are actually SIX of them traveling the country at any given time. They show up at grocery store grand openings, theme parks, pickle festivals, all kinds of events. And the drivers give out merch such as Wienie Beanies, Wienermobile Hot Wheels cars, and the ever popular Wiener Whistles. Well, my friend Robin decided that she wanted to be a Wienermobile driver. So today she’s going to talk about how she made herself stand out from the other ONE THOUSAND applicants and got the job, and what the job is actually like. And a couple of other things – Robin lives in New York City. You’ve heard of The Moth, right? Really popular podcast. In New York, they regularly do storytelling competitions, and Robin has competed in these. They’re called Story Slams. And she has actually won! And at the end of this episode, I asked her to tell me about the time she was able to meet the comedy legend, Jerry Stiller. Great story. So I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. If you’d like to support the show, and get access to all the bonus exclusive content, you can do that at WhatWasThatLike.com/support. YouTube channel – https://www.youtube.com/user/YumsTheWordShow Robin’s blog – https://www.robingelfenbien.com/blog Robin’s website – https://www.robingelfenbien.com/ Recess with Auntie Robin - https://www.facebook.com/groups/2579481095698218 Is the Wienermobile in your area? https://khcmobiletour.com/wienermobile Podcast - http://www.yumsthewordshow.com/ Instagram – https://instagram.com/robin.gelfenbien
Today is September 11. Today is the day we remember and honor those who lost their lives here in America on September 11, 2001. 246 innocent people aboard the four planes that were hijacked. 2,606 people in the World Trade Center and the surrounding area. 343 of these were firefighters, and 71 were law enforcement officers. 125 people in the Pentagon. In today’s episode, we’re going to hear from two people who were there. Lori Brody and her brother, Scott, both worked at the World Trade Center. She survived; he did not. Lori will tell us what happened to her that day, and in the years since. Joe Falco was a New York City firefighter. He was working to save lives at the World Trade Center, and was injured when the buildings collapsed. May we never forget those who were lost on September 11, 2001.
Every sporting activity involves some degree of risk. Risk of injury or even risk of death. I bike about 10 miles each morning and I’m pretty careful. And I record video with a GoPro mounted on my helmet for every ride, which was inspired by my interview with William, episode 20 of this podcast if you want to check that out. But I know that no matter how careful I am, there is still the small possibility that something could happen. Same with almost anything else – running, playing tennis, swimming, you name it. But for most people, when you think of the question, “What is the most dangerous sport?”, the answer that comes to mind is skydiving. It just seems like common sense that jumping out of a plane is really dangerous, right? But in reality, just driving a car is a LOT more dangerous. In fact, statistics show that if you decide to go and do a skydive, you’re 24 times more likely to die in a car accident on the way to the drop zone than you are to die while you’re skydiving. But, the unexpected does happen. Today we’re going to hear from Eric. Eric lives here in Florida and he and I have known each other for years. We’re mostly connected through the ultrarunning community, even though I don’t think either of us actually runs ultramarathons currently. Eric is an avid skydiver. One day Eric was skydiving with about 10 other people. It was a fairly routine jump when they exited the plane, but one person had a serious problem with his main parachute. Then he had a serious problem with his reserve parachute. As you probably know, there isn’t a third parachute. Somehow, Eric was able to see what was happening from thousands of yards away. And he ended up saving someone’s life that day. He also got that whole thing on video.
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Comments (47)

C A.

This is impossible to listen to with the host constantly interrupting. Why would we talk more about the app later?? Can you stay on topic?

May 12th
Reply

Im Watching You

Cougar

Apr 22nd
Reply

Sarah Jane

She told this story on "This is actually happening " I wonder why she's telling it here as well...

Apr 20th
Reply (1)

Renee Blain Stafford

I love all your episodes, but I'm especially enjoying this one because I'm a horse lover :-)

Apr 6th
Reply

Im Watching You

But I thought Obama was going to fix Chicago? ha! joke of a president.

Mar 26th
Reply

Bea Kiddo

There are one or two things that you really don’t want to know, what it was like.

Mar 20th
Reply

Im Watching You

What an idiot.

Mar 19th
Reply

No thankyou

What kind of horrible ghoul wants to listen to four people die? I have really been enjoying the regular episodes where people tell their own stories, but this is really sick, and you need to get help. And the people around you do, too.

Feb 13th
Reply

Maurin Phillips

hard to follow along and listen to this guy.

Feb 12th
Reply

Chad Will

With the way people are on their phones now days it could've ended way worse.

Feb 12th
Reply

Maurin Phillips

that's so creepy... he said the snake looked at him right before the bite.

Feb 12th
Reply

April Hill

I love his honesty! ❤

Feb 10th
Reply

April Hill

Hearing her 911 call brought me to tears. How scary! That app is what probably saved her life! I'm so glad she had an amazing 911 operator.

Jan 17th
Reply

FREE PALESTINE

What in the cousin fuck?

Jan 11th
Reply (1)

FREE PALESTINE

Bravo Monika for standing up against and bringing attention to the misogynist, Nik Richie of She's a Homewrecker and other like-minded, cyber-bullies who run these grotesque websites with the intent of ruining people's lives for personal profit.

Jan 11th
Reply

FREE PALESTINE

"The more you engage in life, regardless what your circumstances are...the less disabled you are." Words to live by.

Jan 10th
Reply

FREE PALESTINE

"got the fish and most importantly I got the girl."

Jan 10th
Reply

FREE PALESTINE

Traumatic survival story, beautifully told. Phantom Vision: "I was the first blind person, I ever met." 📿🖤

Jan 10th
Reply

April Hill

Here's the video!! https://youtube.com/watch?v=FRwaR5lufLQ&feature=share

Jan 5th
Reply

April Hill

I can't wait to see his documentary!!

Dec 30th
Reply
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