Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
When Sylvia Mathews Burwell was appointed Secretary of HHS in 2014, Health and Human Services — the agency responsible for administering Obamacare — was already under intense scrutiny. And the crises just kept coming: a government shutdown, unaccompanied minors at the border, Ebola and Zika. How she found compromise amidst crisis, and mastered preparing for the unexpected.
Effortless: Greg McKeown

Effortless: Greg McKeown

2022-09-2848:531

Leadership strategist and business speaker Greg McKeown is the author of two New York Times-bestselling books: Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less and Effortless: Make It Easier To Do What Matters Most. The core of McKeown's philosophy of "Essentialism" is to identify what is absolutely essential — and then work to prioritize that, and eliminate everything else. McKeown encourages readers to recognize the trade-offs inherent in trying to "do it all so you can have it all." His framework is helpful for every important decision — in both the professional arena, and the personal.
Running the world's wealthiest charitable foundation is all about tough choices. During her meteoric rise at Microsoft, Melinda Gates never guessed she'd spend decades trying to solve global problems. Learning to give by asking the right questions and accepting the limits of your own impact.
The Rise: Sarah Lewis

The Rise: Sarah Lewis

2022-09-1446:05

Dr. Sarah Elizabeth Lewis is Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture and of African and African American Studies at Harvard. Early in her career, she became fascinated with what she calls "back-turned paintings"--the paintings which artists keep turned around in their studios, thereby shielding them from view. She realized all of them were necessary steps in the artists' pursuit of mastery. Dr. Lewis talks about the "ever onward almost" on the path to mastering painting, writing, archery, filmmaking, and, yes, business leadership.
Intuit: Brad Smith

Intuit: Brad Smith

2022-09-0751:411

Why isn't Intuit dead? The key was transforming it into a "36 year old start up," says former CEO Brad Smith. Giving people the chance to make an impact, he says, is vital to energizing a workforce. How he lost $40 million and got promoted, and why vulnerability and failure are intrinsic to good leadership.
In this special live episode, how David Coleman leveraged criticism to revamp the SAT, revive the College Board, and introduce new ways to battle education inequality. The ACT was fast becoming the college entrance heavyweight when he came in to lead the College Board, and the SAT was on 'the brink of elimination.' For many years, detractors argued the test favored the white and wealthy, but Coleman found ways to make it more fair and more popular.
Shellye Archambeau knew as a teenager she wanted to grow up and become a CEO. But when Shellye started as an undergraduate at the Wharton School of Business in 1980, there were just two female CEOs of large corporations, and none of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies were Black. Despite the lack of representation, Shellye became the first Black woman to lead a division of IBM overseas. She broke barriers and took risks leading to a successful career with leadership positions at Blockbuster, Zaplet and MetricStream. Shellye's book, Unapologetically Ambitious: Take Risks, Break Barriers, and Create Success on Your Own Terms, details her singular approach to leadership, and her advice for taking ownership of one's career.
Walgreens: Greg Wasson

Walgreens: Greg Wasson

2022-08-1739:48

Greg Wasson was an aspiring pharmacist with dreams of building his own pharmacy, but before he'd even finished his degree, he found himself climbing the corporate ladder at Walgreens. Bigger opportunities at the company opened up, and he continued to climb, until he eventually reached the CEO chair during a difficult moment in the company's history.
Autodesk: Carl Bass

Autodesk: Carl Bass

2022-08-1001:10:03

Carl Bass, a renegade and reluctant executive, took the helm at Autodesk, and steered the company out of the global economic crisis. At one point, he was so sure it would fail that he was desperate to find a buyer. Instead, he put his own money at risk to try a whole new business model.
YUM! Brands: David Novak

YUM! Brands: David Novak

2022-08-0356:092

David Novak has been a driving force behind brands like Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, KFC, and he co-founded YUM! Brands Inc., one of the biggest players in the quick service restaurant industry. He's written bestsellers including Taking People With You, The Education of an Accidental CEO, and his latest, co-authored with Jason Goldsmith, titled Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career. In this episode: how Novak learned to lead by bringing everybody along with him.
IBM: Lou Gerstner

IBM: Lou Gerstner

2022-07-2749:133

When Lou Gerstner became the CEO of IBM in 1993, he had never worked for a technology company, and IBM was in big trouble: competitors like Microsoft, Dell, and Compaq were eating up market share. Gerstner took the challenge head-on by reimagining IBM's structure and culture, and eventually helped IBM reclaim its position as a dominant force in the tech industry.
Silence: Erling Kagge

Silence: Erling Kagge

2022-07-2045:09

Explorer, writer, and publisher Erling Kagge was the first person to complete the Three Poles Challenge ⁠— reaching the South Pole, the North Pole, and the top of Mt. Everest ⁠— on foot. He talks about what a life of extreme exploration has taught him about silence and the value of failure.
BET: Debra Lee

BET: Debra Lee

2022-07-1355:37

Black Entertainment Television helped make the first Black billionaire in the US and was the first Black-owned business traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Debra Lee, a young lawyer drawn to the company's mission, was pivotal in turning the small, revolutionary cable station into an industry staple. Growing BET and finding confidence as a CEO amid cultural controversy.
Yahoo: Marissa Mayer

Yahoo: Marissa Mayer

2022-07-0601:00:29

Yahoo had been churning through executives when Marissa Mayer became its 7th CEO in just over 5 years. She left a track record of success at Google to take on a floundering company faced with obsolescence. How she infused value into Yahoo on the eve of its acquisition and why failure should be embraced, not feared.
In 2016, Maria Ross realized that she was trying to teach her son that empathy was a way to success, when the world around them seemed to be sending the exact opposite message. So she took her years of experience as a management and brand consultant to make the case for empathy not as a moral imperative, but as a business strategy. She turned her research into a book called The Empathy Edge: Harnessing the Value of Compassion as an Engine for Success.
Sprint: Dan Hesse

Sprint: Dan Hesse

2022-06-2249:09

Customers crave simplicity, Dan Hesse figured out early in his career, as he streamlined phone bills at Sprint. He saved 2 billion dollars, just by taking better care of customers in a few key ways. Plus, just how hard Sprint had to work to get the iPhone on its network, and the movie he hoped would change the company culture.
Tiny Habits: BJ Fogg

Tiny Habits: BJ Fogg

2022-06-1549:381

What does it take for a person to change? BJ Fogg, founder of Stanford's Behavior Design Lab, says the key to behavior change isn't what we've always been taught. In Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything Fogg draws upon true experiments - from his lab and his life - to outline a system anyone can use to create good habits or unravel the bad. In this episode: on making change through design and celebration.
General David Petraeus

General David Petraeus

2022-06-0838:55

General David Petraeus took on a uniquely complex leadership challenge in Iraq in the aftermath of the U.S.-led war there. He oversaw the training of a new and entirely Iraqi army. He says that the key to leadership is first getting the big ideas right, then constantly refining them, and communicating them across the whole organization.
How a New Orleans native turned around a cruise company sinking from a public relations disaster... to one of the most valuable brands in its industry. When Arnold Donald took over Carnival Corporation and the nine cruise lines it operates, one of the biggest things he did was build a new leadership team. Seven of the cruise lines got new heads, including more women and minorities. He says that "diversity of thinking is a business imperative and a powerful advantage," and that you get better ideas and new growth opportunities when your leadership is diverse.
Sanjiv Yajnik is no stranger to taking risks and adapting to change. In fact, he was a marine engineer for more than a decade before deciding to move from India to Canada to pursue an MBA. Since leaving the open sea for the C-suite, he's become known for his purpose-driven leadership and nimble approach to risk management. In this episode: How a young man from Calcutta went from 13 years at sea to being the President of Financial Services at Capital One.
Comments (3)

Michelle Schaefer

I'd love to hear an update after they dealt with the Covid crisis on the cruise ships.

Jun 2nd
Reply

Achieng Adongo

Great information but the editing here wasn't great. There was a bit of repeating.

Nov 15th
Reply

Olumuyiwa Fatoba

It takes a man of character to admit when he is wrong. The General has led an amazing life and I am inspired by his achievements and character. Guy is also a phenomenal host... the questions tell a structured story that stimulates my thoughts in ways I have never experienced, Thank you Guy for all you do.

Jul 9th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store