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World Update: Daily Commute

Author: BBC World Service

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World Update Daily Commute is no longer available to download but you can hear the best of World Update and all our BBC World Service news coverage in our Global News Podcast.
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In Albania, attempts are now being made to discover the fate of about 6,000 people who went missing during 40 years of Communism. Andrew Hoskens in Tirana speaks to one man whose Catholic priest uncle fell foul of Enver Hoxha's regime. (Photo: Nikolin Kurti at the site of the mass grave he exhumed in 2009. Credit: Andrew Hoskens/BBC)
Some UK companies see possible gains from exiting the EU. But a survey of 700 British businesses concludes there is widespread uncertainty. Dan speaks to Paul Kenward of British Sugar, and Professor Nicholas Bloom of Stanford University(Photo: An aerial view of London's financial district on 12 July 2017. Credit: Dan Mullan/Getty Images)
Jean Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission, has been outlining his ambitious vision for the EU's future but is his plan possible? Dr. Ben Margulies, an American Political Scientist teaching at Warwick University in the UK gives analysis on Mr Juncker's plans. We also return to the border issues between the UK and Republic of Ireland because of Brexit. If Brexit negotiations go badly, the currently invisible border might have to be re-erected, with all of the dangers that poses for the peace deal that brought IRA and Ulster loyalist paramilitary violence to an end in 1998. The British government says it will find a way to keep the border invisible while still imposing customs and migration regulations. How they will do that has not been fully explained. Dan Damon speaks with Irish Times writer Fintan O'Toole. (IMAGE: FRANCE-EU-POLITICS-PARLIAMENT - European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker delivers his State of the Union speech at the European Parliament in Strasbourg on September 13, 2017. CREDIT: PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP/Getty Images)
Dan explores the thorny question of whether the EU's top court - the European Court of Justice - will still influence UK law. Also: Polls show pro-Leave voters have no remorse. We hear from polling analyst David Cowling, EU legal expert Professor Steve Peers, and the BBC political reporter Emma Vardy(Photo: The European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. Credit: JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)
The vote for Brexit was the result of a referendum, the third in the UK in recent years. Referendums seem to be getting more and more common; but are they being used wisely and conducted fairly? Dan speaks with the director of the new Independent Commission on Referendums, Alan Renwick from the Constitutional Unit of University College London. There are also updates on this week's Brexit developments, including the UK government publishing position papers on trade and on the border between Northern Ireland and the Irish republic.(IMAGE: A man casts his ballot to vote in a referendum - ANDER GILLENEA/AFP/Getty Images)
One of the big talking points over the past few days has been on freedom of movement - the four freedoms of goods, services, capital and labour that come with European Union membership. Prime Minister Theresa May has insisted that free movement will cease at the end of March 2019 when Britain leaves the EU. And one of the places seriously affected by that change will be Ireland, where the border between the North and the Irish Republic will become the only land border between a non-EU UK and the other 27 member.(Picture: Irish and UK Flag. Credit: Getty Images)
Brexit Watch: Trade Wars

Brexit Watch: Trade Wars

2017-07-2000:23:23

In this week's negotiations between the UK and EU, the issue of trade came up earlier than expected. That's because agricultural import quotas are so important, as Professor. Fiona Smith, a trade law expert from Warwick University told Dan this week. Also Rob Watson on the Northern Ireland question, all on Brexit Watch.
The British government have introduced a bill to Parliament that if approved will convert thousands of European Union laws into British law when Britain leaves, in theory on 29th March 2019. But there are plenty of reasons why that might not go as smoothly as Theresa May's government hopes. To help us understand what should happen, for this week's Brexit Watch we spoke to Dr. Jo Hunt from the School of Law and Politics at Cardiff University. ( Britain & EU Flags: Getty Images)
As negotiations begin Dan Damon speaks to two people with experience of cutting a deal with the European Union. Yanis Varoufakis was the Greek Finance Minister in 2015 and had to negotiate with the EU during the country's government-debt crisis. Jason Langrish is the Executive Director of the Canada Europe Roundtable for Business. He was involved in negotiations on the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA).(Picture: European Parliament. Credit: Getty Images)
In the last of our three-part road trip looking at how Brexit could effect different industries, we go to the docks and see how the haulage industry is prepared for Brexit.(IMAGE: The port of Dover at night CREDIT: merlinpf)
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Comments (1)

Julien Leclair

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Dec 31st
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